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dc.contributorRosolowski, Tacey Ann
dc.contributor.authorRaber, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T22:43:20Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T22:43:20Z
dc.date.created2018-11-05 13:00
dc.date.issuedOctober 17, 2013
dc.identifieroai:cdm16333.contentdm.oclc.org:p16333coll1/1104
dc.identifierRaber_Martin_20131017_S22
dc.identifierhttp://cdm16333.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16333coll1/id/1104
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/561084
dc.description.abstractIn this segment, Dr. Raber first explains that the faculty understood that the institution had to undergo changes in the nineties to operate efficiently. Thus the new budget process instituted under Dr. John Mendelsohn was “painful but not controversial.” Dr. Raber explains a dimension of institutional politics: the power of the Vice Presidents and the Division Heads fluctuates, with one group holding more power as the other group’s wanes. This is largely due to personalities, he observes. Dr. Raber next explains the communication process that had to take place as the “money people” and faculty discussed proposals. He observes that the faculty at MD Anderson might have an easier time with this because so many of them have connections with pharmaceutical companies. Dr. Raber explains that the financial people at MD Anderson learned to frame ideas in terms that the faculty would respond to, primarily addressing whether an idea would be “good for our patients.” He explains that the MD Anderson faculty are good at thinking this way because they deal with one patient population. Staying focused on patient related issues comes easily. Dr. Raber describes the MD Anderson faculty as highly intelligent people who are motivated and passionate and know how to ‘play the game.’ He observes that “normal rewards” in business don’t work if one wants to motivate the faculty. He explains the reasoning behind the saying that “MD Anderson is as close to socialism as you can get.” Physicians’ salaries are not influenced if a patient decides to take chemo rather than have surgery. The egalitarian quality of MD Anderson is “central to our lives,” Dr. Raber says. He ends this segment by observing that Dr. Mendelsohn has a fundamental impact on the institution.
dc.format.mediumXML
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherHistorical Resources Center, Research Medical Library, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
dc.rightsMartin Raber, MD, Oral History Interview, October 17, 2013, Historical Resources Center, Research Medical Library, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
dc.sourceMaking Cancer History® Voices Oral History Collection
dc.subjectB: Growth and/or Change; B: MD Anderson History; B: MD Anderson Snapshot; C: Understanding the Institution; B: Institutional Processes; B: Institutional Politics; C: Professional Practice ; C: The Professional at Work; B: MD Anderson Culture; B: Institutional Mission and Values; C: The Life and Dedication of Clinicians and Researchers
dc.subjectB: MD Anderson Culture
dc.titleSegment 22: Financial People and Faculty Find Common Ground in the Nineties: It’s about Research and the Patients
dc.typeInterview Segment
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ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:15683842
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/15683842
ge.lastmodificationdate2018-11-05 13:00
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ge.oai.setnameMaking Cancer History® Voices Oral History Collection
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