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dc.contributor.authorGoddard, E
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T23:52:19Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T23:52:19Z
dc.date.created2016-12-29 00:04
dc.date.issuedIn Press
dc.identifieroai:ecite.utas.edu.au:113293
dc.identifierhttp://ecite.utas.edu.au/113293
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12152-016-9297-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/605698
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the impacts of neurological intervention on selfhood withreference to recipients claims about changes to their self-understandingfollowing Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for treatment of Parkinsons Disease.In the neuroethics literature, patients claims such as: I dont feel like myselfanymore and I feel like a machine, are often understood as expressingthreats to identity. In this paper I argue that framing debates in terms of apossible threat to identity whether for or against the proposition, is mistakenand occludes what is ethically salient in changes from DBS. Rather, byadopting a relational narrative approach to identity and autonomy, I show thatthe ethically salient issue from DBS is impacts on autonomous agency whether ones actions and beliefs are ones own, and how DBS may hinder, orfoster, embodied, relational autonomy competences. This approach recognizesthat if sufficiently significant, impacts on autonomy competences may pose athreat to ones ability to contribute to the process of authoring ones own lifeand so pose a threat to identity formation. I argue this approach resolves theconfusion in the literature about whether and how DBS threatens identity andprovides a complex picture of how DBS may affect selfhood by disruptingnarrative identity formation and revision, distorting agency and/orundermining autonomy.
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands
dc.relation.ispartofhttp://ecite.utas.edu.au/113293/1/DBS_neuroethics_proofs.pdf
dc.relation.ispartofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12152-016-9297-0
dc.relation.ispartofGoddard, E, Deep Brain Stimulation Through the 'Lens of Agency': Clarifying Threats to Personal Identity from Neurological Intervention, Neuroethics pp. 1-21. ISSN 1874-5490 (In Press) [Refereed Article]
dc.subjectPhilosophy and Religious Studies, Applied Ethics, Bioethics (human and animal)
dc.titleDeep Brain Stimulation Through the 'Lens of Agency': Clarifying Threats to Personal Identity from Neurological Intervention
dc.typeRefereed Article
ge.collectioncodeGA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10340024
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/10340024
ge.lastmodificationdate2016-12-29 00:04
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148650
ge.oai.repositoryid6703
ge.oai.setnameRefereed Article
ge.oai.setnamePhilosophy and Religious Studies, Applied Ethics, Bioethics (human and animal)
ge.oai.setspec63617465676F72793D4131
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ge.linkhttp://ecite.utas.edu.au/113293
ge.linkhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12152-016-9297-0


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