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dc.contributor.authorBesong, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-26T00:27:31Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T00:27:31Z
dc.date.created2018-07-28 23:06
dc.date.issuedforthcoming
dc.identifieroai:philpapers.org/rec/BESVAA
dc.identifierhttps://philpapers.org/rec/BESVAA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/628015
dc.description.abstractAlthough one can find a robust philosophical tradition supporting asceticism in the West, from ancient Greece to at least early modernity, very little attention has been paid to what motivated this broad support. Instead, following criticism from figures such as Hume, Voltaire, Bentham, and Nietzsche, asceticism has been largely disregarded as either eccentric or uniquely religious. In this paper, I provide what I take to be the core moral argument that motivated many philosophical ascetics. In brief, acts of deliberate self-denial are practice in an important part of acting ethically and are thus practically rational as a means to acquiring virtue. And if this argument has been a core motivation for asceticism in the West then arguably philosophical ascetics have been on to something, especially given contemporary empirical research on self-control.
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectPhilosophy
dc.titleVirtue and Asceticism
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
ge.collectioncodeGA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:14816681
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/14816681
ge.lastmodificationdate2018-07-28 23:06
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid149453
ge.oai.repositoryid4212
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.setspecglobetheolib
ge.linkhttps://philpapers.org/rec/BESVAA


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