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dc.contributor.authorvon Kriegstein, Hasko
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-26T00:39:28Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T00:39:28Z
dc.date.created2019-08-14 23:33
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifieroai:philpapers.org/rec/VONOTB
dc.identifierhttps://philpapers.org/rec/VONOTB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/635456
dc.description.abstractBusiness ethics denial refers to one of two claims about moral motivation in a business context: that there is no need for it, or that it is impossible. Neither of these radical claims is endorsed by serious theorists in the academic fields that study business ethics. Nevertheless, public commentators, as well as university students, often make claims that seem to imply that they subscribe to some form of business ethics denial. This paper fills a gap by making explicit both the various forms that business ethics denial can take, and the reasons why such views are ultimately implausible. The paper argues that this type of serious engagement with business ethics denial should be an important part of the job description for teachers of business ethics.
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectPhilosophy
dc.titleOxymoron: taking business ethics denial seriously
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
ge.collectioncodeGA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:16288043
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/16288043
ge.lastmodificationdate2019-08-14 23:33
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid149950
ge.oai.repositoryid4212
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttps://philpapers.org/rec/VONOTB


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