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dc.contributorVan Heerden, Gene
dc.contributorNorth, Ernest J.
dc.contributorLynch, Anna-Mart
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-22T09:12:20Z
dc.date.available2019-10-22T09:12:20Z
dc.date.created2016-05-17 23:54
dc.date.issued2014-08-13
dc.identifieroai:UPSpaceProd:2263/41251
dc.identifierLynch, A 2014, South African females' willingness to pay for ethically framed personal care products, MCom dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/41251>
dc.identifierE14/4/373/gm
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/2263/41251
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/668001
dc.description.abstractDissertation (MCom)--University of Pretoria, 2014.
dc.description.abstractThe study of consumer behaviour is a dynamic and longstanding challenge to continuously understand the factors which influence consumers’ buying behaviour. Though internal (for example attitude, motivation and learning) and external factors (marketing stimuli) are equally important, the focus of this study is on external influences and market trends.
 Consumer markets around the world have recently seen the increase of ethical products. Those products that are differentiated by their moral or sustainable values and attributes, for example environmentally friendly products or body lotions not tested on animals. The provision of these products is a result of organisations’ realisation that in order to increase their customer base, their values must be centred on doing good for the community as well as the environment and should be visible to consumers. For a number of organisations this means marketing the ethical values and attributes of the products they provide so that consumers will ultimately choose their products. However, in order to understand consumers’ willingness to pay for these products, marketers need to understand the price perceptions consumers have towards these products.
 The purpose of this study relates to this and aims to determine the influence that the marketing of ethically framed personal care products, as an external influence, has on consumers’ willingness to pay for these products. More specifically, this study aims to determine whether South African females are willing to pay more for ethically framed personal care products than for ordinary personal care products. This will be done by specifically assessing their reference, fair and reservation price perceptions.
dc.description.abstractgm2014
dc.description.abstractMarketing Management
dc.description.abstractunrestricted
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights© 2014 University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria.
dc.subjectConsumers’ buying behaviour
dc.subjectConsumer behaviour
dc.subjectConsumer markets
dc.subjectMarket trends
dc.subjectUCTD
dc.titleSouth African females' willingness to pay for ethically framed personal care products
dc.typeDissertation
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10126356
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/10126356
ge.lastmodificationdate2016-05-17 23:54
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148650
ge.oai.repositoryid7551
ge.oai.setnameUniversity of Pretoria: Research Output
ge.oai.setnameMarketing Management
ge.oai.setnameEconomic and Management Sciences
ge.oai.setnameTheses and Dissertations (University of Pretoria)
ge.oai.setnameTheses and Dissertations (Marketing Management)
ge.oai.setspeccom_2263_76
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ge.oai.setspeccom_2263_1682
ge.oai.setspeccol_2263_31741
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ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/2263/41251


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