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dc.contributor.authorLipworth, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorKerridge, Ian
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-22T09:12:24Z
dc.date.available2019-10-22T09:12:24Z
dc.date.created2016-05-17 23:57
dc.date.issued2013-11-30
dc.identifieroai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:3858608
dc.identifier/pmc/articles/PMC3858608/
dc.identifier/pubmed/24348871
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.4066/AMJ.2013.1869
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/668032
dc.description.abstractDrug shortages are a growing problem in developed countries. To some extent they are the result of technical and organisational failures, but to view drug shortages simply as technical and economic phenomena is to miss the fact that they are also ethical and political issues. This observation is important because it highlights both the moral and political imperative to respond to drug shortages as vigorously as possible, and the need for those addressing shortages to do so in ethically and politically sophisticated ways. This brief article outlines the ethical issues that need to be considered by anyone attempting to understand or address drug shortages.
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAustralasian Medical Journal
dc.rights© Australasian Medical Journal
dc.subjectReview
dc.titleWhy drug shortages are an ethical issue
dc.typeText
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10126395
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/10126395
ge.lastmodificationdate2016-05-17 23:57
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148650
ge.oai.repositoryid1570
ge.oai.setnameThe Australasian Medical Journal
ge.oai.setspecaustmj
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttps://dx.doi.org/10.4066/AMJ.2013.1869


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