Recent Submissions

  • Safeguarding academic integrity in the face of emergency remote teaching and learning in developing countries

    Bonginkosi Hardy Mutongoza; Babawande Emmanuel Olawale (University of the Free State, 2022-03-01)
    With the operationalisation of lockdowns and restrictions on public gatherings, education systems across the entire globe were confronted with an urgent need to reconsider alternative forms of teaching, learning and assessment. Some institutions in developing countries were especially hard-hit by the shift owing to inadequacies in training and infrastructure because unlike their more developed counterparts who had already made inroads into adopting online technologies, some institutions in the developing world had no such technologies in place. As such, the shift to online learning was rushed and somewhat a “learning on the job” experience for students and educators. While remote online teaching, learning and assessment are novel experiences for many higher education institutions, developing countries are incessantly presented with many challenges, particularly when safeguarding academic integrity. Invigilated assessments, which are often considered more secure, are not an option given the current situation, thus detecting any cheating would be significantly challenging. As a result, this study examined assessment security in the digital domain and critically evaluated the practices to safeguard academic integrity in developing countries across three Southern African universities, including associated challenges. Underpinned by the pragmatist paradigm, the study employed a mixed-methods research approach that utilised in-depth qualitative and quantitative data from university managers, lecturers and students to investigate how academic integrity is safeguarded in the advent of online learning. Our findings revealed that although the transition to online learning and assessment was abrupt, higher education institutions have generated creative strategies to secure and ensure the continuity of learning and assessment. Such strategies include administering several versions of the same examination, as well as the use of “text-matching” software to detect the originality of work done by students. Based on the findings of the study, it was recommended that to guarantee the authenticity of online assessment, institutions must ensure that assessment practices relate to real-world needs and the context in which students can apply acquired knowledge.
  • ArchEthno - a new tool for sharing research materials and a new method for archiving your own research

    Florence Weber; Carlo Zwölf; Arnaud Trouche; Agnès Tricoche; José Sastre (Nicolas Turenne, 2024-01-01)
    The archiving of ethnographic material is generally considered a blind spot in ethnographic working methods which place more importance on actual investigations and analysis than on how archives are constructed. A team of computer scientists and ethnographers has built an initial tool for sharing ethnographic materials, based on an SQL relational data model that suited the first survey processed but proved difficult to transpose to other surveys. The team developed a new tool based on dynamic vocabularies of concepts which breaks down archiving into three stages. Firstly ethnographers can select and contextualise their survey materials; secondly they structure them in a database according to the research question discovered during their survey; finally, they share this data with other researchers subject to the opinion of an ethics committee whose members are competent in ethnography.
  • Ethical Issues of the Organization and Management of Research Information

    Schöpfel, Joachim; Azeroual, Otmane (Communication, technologies et développementChaire Unesco Pratiques émergentes en technologies et communication pour le développement, 2024-03-12)
    The paper offers a comprehensive examination of the ethical considerations surrounding the management of research information within an organization. It includes a summary of survey findings and an overview of ongoing research efforts. Special attention is given to ethical standards pertaining to data quality, data models, and data formats, which are essential factors in organizing research knowledge. As open science continues to gain prominence, research ethics - such as integrity, openness, and transparency - become increasingly crucial. Adhering to these open science principles will play a pivotal role in determining future research funding. Hence, it is crucial to understand how current research information systems (CRIS), a particular type of knowledge organization systems, deal with matters concerning scientific misconduct and integrate ethical guidelines for both individuals and institutions into their data structures.
  • From research misconduct to disciplinary sanction: an empirical examination of French higher education case law

    Centre de Théorie et Analyse du Droit (CTAD) ; Université Paris Nanterre (UPN)-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)-Département de Sciences sociales ENS-PSL ; École normale supérieure - Paris (ENS-PSL) ; Université Paris sciences et lettres (PSL)-Université Paris sciences et lettres (PSL)-École normale supérieure - Paris (ENS-PSL) ; Université Paris sciences et lettres (PSL)-Université Paris sciences et lettres (PSL); Centre de recherches sociologiques sur le droit et les institutions pénales (CESDIP) ; Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (UVSQ)-Ministère de la Justice [Paris, France]-Université Paris-Saclay-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)-CY Cergy Paris Université (CY); ANR-20-CE27-0016,CRISP,Les enjeux d'intégrité scientifique dans les pratiques de recherche(2020); Leclerc, Olivier; Klausser, Nicolas (HAL CCSDSage, 2024)
    International audience
  • Academic Dishonesty – A preliminary researchers’ view

    Shawren Singh (13355904); John Mendy (17163391) (2019-06-20)
    Increasingly academe is facing the challenge of dealing with allegations of plagiarism and academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty plagues both the degree acquisition process as well and the publishing process. Academic dishonesty within the university space has been clouded in mystery, as many universities are not willing to break the code of silence. However, within the academic publishing space, several respectable journals had to withdraw published papers citing academic dishonesty as a concern. At the core of academic dishonesty is the researcher and their perceptions of issues affecting academic dishonesty. The purpose of this research is to develop a better understanding of researchers’ attitudes to issues of academic dishonesty. This study is quantitative in nature and primary data in the form of Likert scale questions were collected from developing researchers. The questionnaire data were statistically analysed, and a framework was developed to outline emerging researchers’ perceptions of academic dishonesty. Key findings included academic dishonesty is influenced by several issues such as academic pressure, electronic deterrents, writing challenges, outsourcing, data challenges, plagiarism, database challenges, and electronic sources. This is important because by better understanding researchers’ perceptions to academic dishonesty, (1) appropriate training interventions can be implemented (2) higher quality research will be produced and (3) research funding will not be wasted.
  • ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science: Citizen Scientists

    Mežinska, Signe; Neiders, Ivars (Zenodo, 2024-03-10)
    <p>The aim of the ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science is to learn how to practice open science (OS) responsibly and how to prevent research misconduct in the context of OS by providing necessary knowledge and developing specific skills and attitudes.</p> <p>The training material consists of a trainers' file including 8 units and respective activities, as well as materials for trainees – <a href="https://rosie-project.eu/knowledge-hub/#!training/social-sciences">handouts and printouts</a>. The activities can be implemented separately (e.g., for organising a single workshop to discuss cases) or for organising a complete two-day training course. </p> <p>Additionally, trainers can use the <a href="https://classroom.eneri.eu/node/82">ROSiE online training course</a> as a complementary resource to this training material. Students and researchers can use ROSiE online learning modules to implement <strong>self-directed learning.</strong> In this case, the trainee as a user of online ROSiE training materials takes the initiative, with or without the help of the trainer, determines his/her learning needs, formulates learning goals and evaluates learning outcomes. In this process, trainees are in charge of their learning, and they are autonomous in choosing what, how and where they are learning. Online training materials can also be used for the implementation of <strong>blended learning</strong>, which combines traditional on-site training led by a trainer with using online content to allow trainees to build their own learning experience. By blending face-to-face and online training methods, trainees can benefit from guidance and interaction with a trainer while having access to interactive and flexible training opportunities outside the classroom. Blended learning allows development of <strong>multimodal learning</strong> through visual, auditory, reading, discussion and writing methods. Multimodal learning expands inclusive learning opportunities.</p>
  • ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science: Health and Life Sciences

    Mežinska, Signe; Neiders, Ivars (Zenodo, 2024-03-10)
    <p>The aim of the ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science is to learn how to practice open science (OS) responsibly and how to prevent research misconduct in the context of OS by providing necessary knowledge and developing specific skills and attitudes.</p> <p>The training material consists of a trainers' file including 8 units and respective activities, as well as materials for trainees – <a href="https://rosie-project.eu/knowledge-hub/#!training/social-sciences">handouts and printouts</a>. The activities can be implemented separately (e.g., for organising a single workshop to discuss cases) or for organising a complete two-day training course. </p> <p>Additionally, trainers can use the <a href="https://classroom.eneri.eu/node/82">ROSiE online training course</a> as a complementary resource to this training material. Students and researchers can use ROSiE online learning modules to implement <strong>self-directed learning.</strong> In this case, the trainee as a user of online ROSiE training materials takes the initiative, with or without the help of the trainer, determines his/her learning needs, formulates learning goals and evaluates learning outcomes. In this process, trainees are in charge of their learning, and they are autonomous in choosing what, how and where they are learning. Online training materials can also be used for the implementation of <strong>blended learning</strong>, which combines traditional on-site training led by a trainer with using online content to allow trainees to build their own learning experience. By blending face-to-face and online training methods, trainees can benefit from guidance and interaction with a trainer while having access to interactive and flexible training opportunities outside the classroom. Blended learning allows development of <strong>multimodal learning</strong> through visual, auditory, reading, discussion and writing methods. Multimodal learning expands inclusive learning opportunities.</p>
  • ROSiE Case Collection: Responsible Open Science

    Simm, Kadri; Eigi-Watkin, Jaana; Mežinska, Signe; Neiders, Ivars (Zenodo, 2024-03-07)
    <p><span>This is a case collection for the ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science. Many cases included in this material are used in the ROSiE traditional and <a href="https://classroom.eneri.eu/node/82">online training materials</a>; however, if trainers want to use additional cases or address a topic that is not directly addressed in the training materials, they might consult this collection of cases. This material can also be used independently from the training materials for any course addressing ethical issues in open science and citizen science. Additionally, for six of the cases there are animations available on the </span><a href="https://rosie-project.eu/"><span>ROSiE Knowledge Hub</span></a><span>. </span></p> <p><span>After each case, there are questions for discussion, as well as supplementary readings that may be used by a trainer or assigned as required or optional readings for trainees.</span><span> The case collection includes an index (p. 5) where cases are grouped according to field of science, stage of research and topic</span></p> <div> </div>
  • Disclosure of Support Statement: Increasing Student Transparency About Support from Software Like ChatGPT

    Lipuma, James; Leon, Cristo (Digital Commons @ NJIT, 2024-03-01)
    Our latest publication in the Journal of Engineering Research introduces the Disclosure of Support Statement (DSS) tool to enhance transparency and student engagement in academic writing. This innovative tool encourages students to openly discuss and reflect on the various human and software supports utilized in their writing processes, such as professors, peers, and artificial intelligence software tools. The DSS tool seeks to initiate meaningful conversations around academic integrity and the educational journey by promoting ethical considerations and fostering critical thinking. Through a detailed pilot study, our research offers insights into student attitudes towards support mechanisms, setting the stage for further development and refinement of the DSS tool to better support academic writing and ethical understanding in the educational landscape.
  • Beyond the “Death of Research”: Reimagining the Human–AI Collaboration in Scientific Research

    Salah, M.; Abdelfattah, F.; Al Halbusi, H.; Mohammed, M. (Уральский федеральный университетUral Federal University, 2024-03-04)
    Received 8 August 2023. Accepted 15 December 2023. Published online 27 December 2023.
  • ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science: Natural Sciences

    Mežinska, Signe; Neiders, Ivars (Zenodo, 2024-03-09)
    <p>The aim of the ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science is to learn how to practice open science (OS) responsibly and how to prevent research misconduct in the context of OS by providing necessary knowledge and developing specific skills and attitudes.</p> <p>The training material consists of a trainers' file including 8 units and respective activities, as well as materials for trainees – <a href="https://rosie-project.eu/knowledge-hub/#!training/social-sciences">handouts and printouts</a>. The activities can be implemented separately (e.g., for organising a single workshop to discuss cases) or for organising a complete two-day training course. </p> <p>Additionally, trainers can use the <a href="https://classroom.eneri.eu/node/82">ROSiE online training course</a> as a complementary resource to this training material. Students and researchers can use ROSiE online learning modules to implement <strong>self-directed learning.</strong> In this case, the trainee as a user of online ROSiE training materials takes the initiative, with or without the help of the trainer, determines his/her learning needs, formulates learning goals and evaluates learning outcomes. In this process, trainees are in charge of their learning, and they are autonomous in choosing what, how and where they are learning. Online training materials can also be used for the implementation of <strong>blended learning</strong>, which combines traditional on-site training led by a trainer with using online content to allow trainees to build their own learning experience. By blending face-to-face and online training methods, trainees can benefit from guidance and interaction with a trainer while having access to interactive and flexible training opportunities outside the classroom. Blended learning allows development of <strong>multimodal learning</strong> through visual, auditory, reading, discussion and writing methods. Multimodal learning expands inclusive learning opportunities.</p>
  • ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science: Social Sciences

    Mežinska, Signe; Neiders, Ivars (Zenodo, 2024-03-09)
    <p><span>The aim of the ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science is to learn how to practice open science (OS) responsibly and how to prevent research misconduct in the context of OS by providing necessary knowledge and developing specific skills and attitudes.</span></p> <p><span><span>The training material consists of a trainers' file including 8 units and respective activities, as well as materials for trainees – <a href="https://rosie-project.eu/knowledge-hub/#!training/social-sciences">handouts and printouts</a>. The activities can be implemented separately (e.g., for organising a single workshop to discuss cases) or for organising a complete two-day training course. </span></span></p> <p><span>Additionally, trainers can use the </span><span><a href="https://classroom.eneri.eu/node/82"><span>ROSiE online training course</span></a></span><span> as a complementary resource to this training material. Students and researchers can use ROSiE online learning modules to implement <strong>self-directed learning.</strong> In this case, the trainee as a user of online ROSiE training materials takes the initiative, with or without the help of the trainer, determines his/her learning needs, formulates learning goals and evaluates learning outcomes. In this process, trainees are in charge of their learning, and they are autonomous in choosing what, how and where they are learning. Online training materials can also be used for the implementation of <strong>blended learning</strong>, which combines traditional on-site training led by a trainer with using online content to allow trainees to build their own learning experience. By blending face-to-face and online training methods, trainees can benefit from guidance and interaction with a trainer while having access to interactive and flexible training opportunities outside the classroom. Blended learning allows development of <strong>multimodal learning</strong> through visual, auditory, reading, discussion and writing methods. Multimodal learning expands inclusive learning opportunities.</span><span><br></span></p>
  • ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science: Humanities

    Mežinska, Signe; Neiders, Ivars (Zenodo, 2024-03-09)
    <p>The aim of the ROSiE Training Materials for Responsible Open Science is to learn how to practice open science (OS) responsibly and how to prevent research misconduct in the context of OS by providing necessary knowledge and developing specific skills and attitudes.</p> <p>The training material consists of a trainers' file including 8 units and respective activities, as well as materials for trainees – <a href="https://rosie-project.eu/knowledge-hub/#!training/social-sciences">handouts and printouts</a>. The activities can be implemented separately (e.g., for organising a single workshop to discuss cases) or for organising a complete two-day training course. </p> <p>Additionally, trainers can use the <a href="https://classroom.eneri.eu/node/82">ROSiE online training course</a> as a complementary resource to this training material. Students and researchers can use ROSiE online learning modules to implement <strong>self-directed learning.</strong> In this case, the trainee as a user of online ROSiE training materials takes the initiative, with or without the help of the trainer, determines his/her learning needs, formulates learning goals and evaluates learning outcomes. In this process, trainees are in charge of their learning, and they are autonomous in choosing what, how and where they are learning. Online training materials can also be used for the implementation of <strong>blended learning</strong>, which combines traditional on-site training led by a trainer with using online content to allow trainees to build their own learning experience. By blending face-to-face and online training methods, trainees can benefit from guidance and interaction with a trainer while having access to interactive and flexible training opportunities outside the classroom. Blended learning allows development of <strong>multimodal learning</strong> through visual, auditory, reading, discussion and writing methods. Multimodal learning expands inclusive learning opportunities.</p>
  • On Advantage or Disadvantage of Academic Scholarship for Life

    Марія Култаєва; Надія Григорова (National Academy of Educational Sciences of Ukraine. Institute of Higher Education, 2024-02-01)
    The article with allusions on Nietzsche’s provocation about history lessons proposes an interdisciplinary approach to academic scholarship considered as a special cultural and organizational form of advanced studies aimed at professional development or skill exchange, which have influence on human being in contemporary societies involved in the process of globalization. The theoretical conceptualization of institutionalized forms of scholarships and internships is analyze in connection with its practical representation and economical allocation. Pathological representations of academic scholarship as an end in itself are unveiled as a kind of conspicuous consumptions symbolizing the status position or exclusivity on the borders between academic community and mass-media. The purpose of this article is to explicate some representations of academic scholarship in the contexts of the academic capitalism searching the way of overcoming its utilitarian limitations with universal ethical imperatives. To realize such a purpose, phenomenological reduction is applied in combination with the biographical method. Assumptions made in the article are verified on biographical fragments of curriculum vitae of influential sociologists such as Ralf Dahrendorf and Niklas Luhmann, because the social and professional self-realization and revision of the life-priorities of them was due in many aspects to academic scholarship gained by different ways but with success, especially in the field of educational policy and in the case of establishing democracy in the process of post-totalitarian transformation in Germany. This experience can be useful for Ukraine as well. The phenomenon of the cultural shock and its influence on visiting scholars is explicated. The role of communication between epistemic cultures is emphasized on by overcoming epistemic injustice and establishing academic integrity.
  • Research integrity challenges in higher education

    Kugai, Kseniia (Baltija Publishing, 2024-02-26)
    The abstract studies the complex array of challenges associated with maintaining research integrity within the framework of higher education establishments. The primary objectives of this work are to comprehensively explore these challenges, examine their outcomes, and propose potential avenues for mitigation.
  • Human subjects research guidelines for undergraduate researchers : an analysis of Institutional Review Board (IRB) websites at top Liberal Arts Colleges in the United States

    Marcos Miguel, Nausica; Noy, Shiri (2023)
    Teaching students about the ethics of Human Subject Research (HSR) should be a fundamental component of students' education about research. In this article, we analyze the Institutional Review Board (IRB) websites of top-ranked Liberal Arts Colleges (LACs) to examine their framing of HSR carried out by undergraduate students. Our descriptive quantitative analysis from 50 top-ranked LACs in the United States indicates that a majority of IRB websites provide information about undergraduate research, and most include information about students' classroom-based research. Our qualitative content analysis of a subsample of ten colleges' IRB websites provides information on how they inform and educate about issues including informed consent and highlight different resources for students including their research advisor, and disciplinary standards. We conclude by discussing recommendations for IRBs in their accessibility to undergraduates.
  • TORCH D11.3 - Annual Open Forum 3 Report

    Marfany, Gemma; Burillo, Blanca; TORCH Consortium (CHARM-EU, 2023-12)
    <p>The third TORCH Annual Forum 'Science with and for Society in European Universities Alliances: Cross-Alliances Forum 2023' is a collaborative and insightful hybrid event hosted by Université libre de Bruxelles (CIVIS). This hybrid forum is address to representatives from European Universities Alliances, researchers, innovators, policymakers, European Commission representatives and other stakeholders from the European Research Area. The focus is the results, achievements and challenges from the European Universities Alliances’ SwafS projects and the exploration of best practices and insights related to the transformational modules. The topics include the development of a common R&I agenda, resource sharing, joint structures, human capital enhancement, and collaboration with the non-academic sector. The forum also emphasises Open Science practices and the engagement of citizens and society in Alliance activities.</p> <p>The forum was led by an Organising Committee including 11 Alliances that were led by TORCH. The dissemination efforts of this forum were coordinated by a dedicated communication group with 5 representatives from 5 Alliances who ensured effective outreach and impact. The European Research Executive Agency also played a crucial role in maximising the outreach of this event by extending invitations, creating an event page, and featuring the forum in its newsletter.</p> <p>This report, TORCH's deliverable D11.3, provides the meeting agenda, session debriefs, and key conclusions.</p> <p>The meeting programme includes plenary sessions, roundtables, workshops, and poster presentations. The first morning is focused on policy and strategic aspects of the European Universities Alliances’ research area, featuring presentations on the European Commission’s strategy, joint R&I activities, and assessments of Alliances’ impact. During the afternoon, the sessions showcase the Alliances’ outcomes through different workshops and an interactive poster session. The second day, the sessions are centred on inspiring the future of R&I in Europe with roundtables exploring topics such as research ethics and integrity, inter- and transdisciplinarity and responsible R&I. The concluding session synthesises the discussions from workshops and roundtables, providing the insights into transformative impacts, funding landscapes, and future trajectories for research within European University Alliances.</p> <p>The forum fostered dialogue, knowledge exchange, and collaboration among Alliances with external stakeholders, policymakers and other external stakeholders. The 'Science with and for Society in European Universities Alliances: Cross-Alliances Forum 2023 is a testament of the commitment of European Universities Alliances to drive excellence, foster collaboration and shape the future of the European Research Area.</p>
  • Barriers to knowledge mobilisation: implications for responsible and inclusive research in higher education

    Ruiz-Bernardo, Paola; Sales, Dora; Sanahuja Ribés, Aida; Moliner Garcia, Odet (Taylor and Francis GroupRoutledge, 2023-10-13)
    From an understanding of knowledge mobilisation as a set of strategies that favour responsible and inclusive research, the aim of this paper is to identify the obstacles or barriers to carrying out such research in higher education institutions, as perceived by researchers. In this descriptive study, content analysis is used to examine semi-structured interviews carried out with eighty research groups from five European countries (Austria, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia and Spain) that participated in the research. Results reveal the main barriers researchers perceived are associated with social commitment, relational aspects, encouragement to participate (attitudinal, organisational and institutional barriers) and knowledge mobilisation practices (derived from the research process and research evaluation policies). Ethical and policy implications for more responsible and inclusive research are drawn in the conclusions.
  • Human subjects research guidelines for undergraduate researchers : an analysis of Institutional Review Board (IRB) websites at top Liberal Arts Colleges in the United States

    Marcos Miguel, NausicaLW220002216409568020042586390000-0003-0351-81743d24dc98-8a28-11ed-af7a-91df7bd0848f; Noy, Shiri (2023)
    Teaching students about the ethics of Human Subject Research (HSR) should be a fundamental component of students' education about research. In this article, we analyze the Institutional Review Board (IRB) websites of top-ranked Liberal Arts Colleges (LACs) to examine their framing of HSR carried out by undergraduate students. Our descriptive quantitative analysis from 50 top-ranked LACs in the United States indicates that a majority of IRB websites provide information about undergraduate research, and most include information about students' classroom-based research. Our qualitative content analysis of a subsample of ten colleges' IRB websites provides information on how they inform and educate about issues including informed consent and highlight different resources for students including their research advisor, and disciplinary standards. We conclude by discussing recommendations for IRBs in their accessibility to undergraduates.
  • A flimsy case for the use of non-human primates in research: a reply to Arnason

    Faria, Catia (BMJ Publishing Group, 2018)
    This work has been supported by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (Grant number: SFRH/BPD/116818/2016).

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