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dc.contributor.authorOelschlager, Steve
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-23T12:50:28Z
dc.date.available2019-09-23T12:50:28Z
dc.date.created2018-03-28 23:06
dc.date.issued2018-03-16
dc.identifieroai:currents.localhost:8888:article/108
dc.identifierhttp://www.currentsjournal.org/index.php/currents/article/view/108
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/6973
dc.description.abstractJesus did not ask us to follow him to make our lives worse. Even though there is a cost to discipleship (letting go of our false self and old ways of being), there is a corresponding benefit that is meant to lure us into something better: abundant life and the life that truly is life. Ultimately, our hope as church is that stewardship should be about both personal and social transformation, as opposed to something more limited, like making the world a better place.
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherLutheran School of Theology at Chicago
dc.relation.ispartofhttp://www.currentsjournal.org/index.php/currents/article/view/108/128
dc.rightsCopyright (c) 2018 Currents in Theology and Mission
dc.sourceCurrents in Theology and Mission; Vol 45, No 2 (2018): Fresh Stewardship; 5
dc.titleTransformational Stewardship: Should We Expect a Net Benefit from Following Jesus?
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
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ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:14322710
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/14322710
ge.lastmodificationdate2018-03-28 23:06
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ge.linkhttp://www.currentsjournal.org/index.php/currents/article/view/108


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