• Facebook's Emotional Contagion Experiment as a Challenge to Research Ethics

      Jouhki, Jukka; Lauk, Epp; Penttinen, Maija; Sormanen, Niina; Uskali, Turo (MISC, 2017-09-29)
      This article analyzes the ethical discussion focusing on the Facebook emotional contagion experiment published by the 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences' in 2014. The massive-scale experiment manipulated the News Feeds of a large amount of Facebook users and was successful in proving that emotional contagion happens also in online environments. However, the experiment caused ethical concerns within and outside academia mainly for two intertwined reasons, the first revolving around the idea of research as manipulation, and the second focusing on the problematic definition of informed consent. The article concurs with recent research that the era of social media and big data research are posing a significant challenge to research ethics, the practice and views of which are grounded in the pre social media era, and reflect the classical ethical stances of utilitarianism and deontology.
    • Facebook’s Emotional Contagion Experiment as a Challenge to Research Ethics

      Jukka Jouhki; Epp Lauk; Maija Penttinen; Niina Sormanen; Turo Uskali (Cogitatio, 2016-10-01)
      This article analyzes the ethical discussion focusing on the Facebook emotional contagion experiment published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2014. The massive-scale experiment manipulated the News Feeds of a large amount of Facebook users and was successful in proving that emotional contagion happens also in online environments. However, the experiment caused ethical concerns within and outside academia mainly for two intertwined reasons, the first revolving around the idea of research as manipulation, and the second focusing on the problematic definition of informed consent. The article concurs with recent research that the era of social media and big data research are posing a significant challenge to research ethics, the practice and views of which are grounded in the pre social media era, and reflect the classical ethical stances of utilitarianism and deontology.
    • Facebook’s Emotional Contagion Experiment as a Challenge to Research Ethics

      Jouhki, Jukka; Lauk, Epp; Penttinen, Maija; Sormanen, Niina; Uskali, Turo (Cogitatio Press, 2016-10-13)
      This article analyzes the ethical discussion focusing on the Facebook emotional contagion experiment published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2014. The massive-scale experiment manipulated the News Feeds of a large amount of Facebook users and was successful in proving that emotional contagion happens also in online environments. However, the experiment caused ethical concerns within and outside academia mainly for two intertwined reasons, the first revolving around the idea of research as manipulation, and the second focusing on the problematic definition of informed consent. The article concurs with recent research that the era of social media and big data research are posing a significant challenge to research ethics, the practice and views of which are grounded in the pre social media era, and reflect the classical ethical stances of utilitarianism and deontology.
    • Facilitating Ethical Research: Promoting Informed Choice

      National Council on Bioethics in Human Research (Canada), 2015-05-05
    • Facilitating Ethical Research: Promoting Informed Choice

      National Council on Bioethics in Human Research (Canada), 2016-01-08
    • Facilitating Healthcare Ethics Research: Assessment of Moral Reasoning and Moral Orientation From a Single Interview

      Self, Donnie J.; Skeel, Joy D. (2015-05-05)
      Conclusion: An instrument has been developed that will adequately provide data and will greatly facilitate studies of the relationship of moral reasoning to moral orientation and studies of each factor alone for correlation with other characteristics. With the MROI [Moral Reasoning/Orientation Interview], studies that could correlate the moral orientation obtained by the Aesop fables (a technique previously used only with children) with the moral orientation obtained by the real-life dilemmas can more easily be conducted. Because the Aesop fable technique is much simpler and quicker and is less threatening, it may become an interesting refinement in the process of assessment of moral orientation.
    • Facing Up to Paternalism in Research Ethics

      Wertheimer, Alan.; Miller, Franklin G. (The Hastings Center, 2007-06-12)
      Hastings Center Report - Volume 37, Number 3, May-June 2007
    • Facing Up to Paternalism in Research Ethics

      Miller, Franklin G.; Wertheimer, Alan (2016-01-08)
    • Fact sheet: Embryonic stem cell research

      United States. White House. Office of the Press Secretary (2011-07-12)
      9 August 2001
    • Fact sheet: Embryonic stem cell research

      United States. White House. Office of the Press Secretary (2011-07-12)
      9 August 2001
    • Factors Contributing to Faculty Research Misconduct

      Gordon, Anita; Harton, Helen (UNI ScholarWorks, 2015-09-18)
      This poster shares selected results from a national survey, funded by the U.S. Office of Research Integrity, to investigate the perceptions of research misconduct by faculty researchers from four disciplinary areas (biology, social work, sociology, and psychology). About 4,500 faculty from 107 randomly selected research-intensive and master’s comprehensive universities were invited to participate, leading to a response rate of approximately 40%. Respondents assessed scenarios depicting researcher misbehavior and reported how likely they would be to take those actions under the same circumstances. They also rated their perceptions of how wrong the actions were, how likely the actions were to become known to others, and what sanctions might be applied if the actions were to become known. In addition, respondents reported their perceptions of organizational justice in their own research environments as well as external funding expectations and publication productivity.
    • Factors influencing parental consent for participation in clinical research involving their children in Egypt

      Nasef, N.; Shabaan, A.; Mohammed, S.; Kandel, S.; Settin, A.; Zedan, M.; Fouda, A. (World Health Organization, Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, 2015-12-07)
      162-168
    • Failure to Report and Provide Commentary on Research Ethics Board Approval and Informed Consent in Medical Journals

      Finlay, K.A.; Fernandez, C.V. (2016-01-08)
      BACKGROUND: The Declaration of Helsinki prohibits the publication of articles that do not meet defined ethical standards for reporting of research ethics board (REB) approval and informed consent. Despite this prohibition and a call to highlight the deficiency for the reader, articles with potential ethical shortcomings continue to be published. OBJECTIVE: To determine what proportion of articles in major medical journals lack statements confirming REB approval and informed consent, and whether accompanying commentary alerts readers to this deficiency. DESIGN: Retrospective, observational study. SETTING: Online review of five major medical journals. POPULATION: All clinical research articles published online between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006 in the BMJ, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, JAMA and the New England Journal of Medicine. MEASUREMENTS: Statement of REB approval and informed consent. RESULTS: Of 1780 articles reviewed, 1133 (63.7%) met inclusion criteria (manuscripts reporting human subjects, human tissue or identifiable personal data research), 36 (3.2%) articles lacked a statement of REB approval, 62 (5.5%) lacked disclosure of informed consent and 15 (1.3%) articles lacked both. Articles that did not state REB approval were associated with not stating informed consent (p