• Maatskaplike werk intervensie met gesinne van diverse kultuur en agtergrond

      Green, Sulina; Stellenbosch University. Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dept. of Social Work.; Koch, Maria Martina (Stellenbosch : Stellenbosch University, 2012-08-27)
      Thesis (M Social Work)--Stellenbosch University, 2002.
    • Machiavellianism and Counterproductive Behaviors at Workplace

      Tehzeeb Sakina Amir & Anila Amber Malik (Geist Science, 2016-03-01)
      The purpose of this research is to study the preference towards getting involved in counterproductive behaviors at workplace in relation to the Machiavellianism personality attribute. One hundred and seventy six executive men/women working at supervisory/managerial level having a minimum of three years working experience were selected randomly. The tests administered were: Mach IV Scale and Counterproductive Work Behavior Checklist along with demographic sheet. Individuals who have reported high scores on Machiavellianism were found to be positively correlated with a preference for counterproductive work behaviors. Correlation values are found significant at 0.01 level. The data analysis of sub-scales of Counterproductive work behavior checklist namely: abuse, production deviance, sabotage, theft and withdrawal revealed there is an overall preference for getting involved in counterproductive work behaviors by high machs.
    • machtverhältnis und Machtmoral.

      Vierkandt, Alfred, 1867-1953. (Berlin : von Reuther & Reichard,, 1916)
      "Vortrag, gehalten in der Berliner Abteilung der Kantgesellschaft am 19. Mai 1916."
    • Maintaining Informed Consent Validity During Lengthy Research Protocols

      Prentice, Kristen J.; Appelbaum, Paul S.; Conley, Robert R.; Carpenter, William T. (2016-01-08)
    • Make, Buy, Organize: The Interplay between Research, External Knowledge, and Firm Structure

      Arora, Ashish; Belenzon, Sharon; Rios, Luis A (ScholarlyCommons, 2014-03-01)
      We bridge current streams of innovation research to explore the interplay between R&D, external knowledge, and organizational structure–three elements of a firm's innovation strategy which we argue should logically be studied together. Using within-firm patent assignment patterns, we develop a novel measure of structure for a large sample of American firms. We find that centralized firms invest more in research and patent more per R&D dollar than decentralized firms. Both types access technology via mergers and acquisitions, but their acquisitions differ in terms of frequency, size, and integration. Consistent with our framework, their sources of value creation differ: while centralized firms derive more value from internal R&D, decentralized firms rely more on external knowledge. We discuss how these findings should stimulate more integrative work on theories of innovation.
    • Making ethical deliberations public: Some provisional resources for youth research ethics

      Te Riele, K; Brooks, R (Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 2012)
      The focus of this special edition of Youth Studies Australia is on questions, issues, challenges and (tentative) solutions in relation to ensuring that research with young people is conducted ethically. This introductory paper by the guest editors of this edition draws on ethical principles as outlined in the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans and in the Fairbridge Code of Ethics for youth work. The authors explain how these principles can inform ethical youth research. In the process, they weave through comments to and from the remaining !ve papers, providing an authentic touchstone for the principles, as well as recommending the papers to you.
    • Making ethical deliberations public: Some provisional resources for youth research ethics

      Te Riele, K; Brooks, R (Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 2012)
      The focus of this special edition of Youth Studies Australia is on questions, issues, challenges and (tentative) solutions in relation to ensuring that research with young people is conducted ethically. This introductory paper by the guest editors of this edition draws on ethical principles as outlined in the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans and in the Fairbridge Code of Ethics for youth work. The authors explain how these principles can inform ethical youth research. In the process, they weave through comments to and from the remaining five papers, providing an authentic touchstone for the principles, as well as recommending the papers to you.
    • Making it clear and relevant:Patients and carers add value to studies through research document reviews

      Staley, Kristina; Ashcroft, Joanne; Doughty, Lisa; Szmukler, George (2016-03-14)
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    • Making researchers moral : Why trustworthiness requires more than ethics guidelines and review

      Johnsson, Linus; Eriksson, Stefan; Helgesson, Gert; Hansson, Mats G. (Uppsala universitet, Centrum för forsknings- och bioetikUppsala universitet, Centrum för forsknings- och bioetikUppsala universitet, Centrum för forsknings- och bioetikStockholm Centre for Healthcare Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 2014)
      Research ethics, once a platform for declaring intent, discussing moral issues and providing advice and guidance to researchers, has developed over time into an extra-legal regulatory system, complete with steering documents (ethics guidelines), overseeing bodies (research ethics committees) and formal procedures (informed consent). The process of institutionalizing distrust is usually motivated by reference to past atrocities committed in the name of research and the need to secure the trustworthiness of the research system. This article examines some limitations of this approach. First, past atrocities cannot provide the necessary justification unless institutionalized distrust is a necessary or efficient means to prevent future ones – and there are several reasons to doubt this. Second, the efficacy of ethics review in safeguarding morally acceptable research depends on the moral competence and integrity of individual researchers – the very qualities that institutionalized distrust calls into question. Third, ethics guidelines cannot, as is sometimes assumed, educate or guide researchers in moral behaviour unless they already possess considerable capacity for moral judgment. Fourth, institutionalized distrust is a potential threat to the moral competence and integrity of researchers by encouraging a blinkered view of ethical issues, inducing moral heteronomy through incentives, and alienating them to research ethics. We conclude that the moral problem posed by inappropriate short-term behaviour on behalf of researchers is dwarfed by the potential long-term consequences if their moral competence is allowed to deteriorate. Measures must therefore be taken to ensure that researchers are equipped to take their individual responsibility and are not obstructed from so doing.
    • Maladie d’Alzheimer, éthique, droit et citoyenneté

      Sciences Po Aix - Institut d'études politiques d'Aix-en-Provence (IEP Aix-en-Provence); Meyer-Heine, Anne (HAL CCSDAcademia-L'Harmattan, 2014)
      En collaboration avec l’Espace Ethique Méditerranéen de l’hôpital de la Timone (Marseille), l’Espace de Recherche sur l’Ethique et la Maladie d’Alzheimer (EREMA Paris), la Fondation Médéric Alzheimer, l’Agence Régionale de Santé PACA, l’Union Régionale des Associations Familiales (URAF PACA), le Conseil Général des Bouches-du-Rhône
    • Maladies d’Alzheimer, génétique et concepts d’autonomie

      Institut de recherches philosophiques de Lyon (IRPhiL) ; Université Jean Moulin - Lyon 3 (UJML) ; Université de Lyon-Université de Lyon; Centre de recherche sens, ethique, société (CERSES - UMR 8137) ; Université Paris Descartes - Paris 5 (UPD5)-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS); Université Jean Moulin - Lyon 3 (UJML) ; Université de Lyon; N. Kopp; C. Thomas-Antérion; M.-P. Réthy; J.-P. Pierron; Dekeuwer, Catherine (HAL CCSDLes Belles Lettres, 2010)
      International audience
    • Malawians Permit Research Bronchoscopy Due to Perceived Need for Healthcare

      Mtunthama, N.; Malamba, R.; French, N.; Molyneux, M.E.; Zijlstra, E.E.; Gordon, S.B. (2016-01-08)
      Objectives: Bronchoalveolar lavage obtained at bronchoscopy is useful for research on pulmonary defence mechanisms. Bronchoscopy involves some discomfort and risk to subjects. We audited the process of consent, experienced adverse effects and reasons for participation among research bronchoscopy volunteers. Design: 100 consecutive volunteer research subjects attending for bronchoscopy, repeat bronchoscopy or routine recruitment clinic were interviewed. Information was gathered about volunteer motivation, perception of the consent process and adverse effects of bronchoscopy. Suggestions for improvement were requested. Responses were themed by a second investigator prior to data analysis. Results: 81 bronchoscopy-experienced subjects (total of 263 procedures) and 19 new volunteers were interviewed. 19 subjects (21%) reported adverse symptoms during or after bronchoscopy, but no symptoms were of sufficient severity that they would not repeat the procedure. The frequency of symptoms was not related to gender, the quality of the lavage or the HIV status of the subject. 76 subjects (94%) reported that the information given pre-procedure was useful and adequate but 43 (56%) had further questions mostly relating to their own results. The reasons given for research participation were access to health assessment (75 subjects), access to treatment when ill (61 subjects), desire to participate in research (15 subjects) and remuneration (6 subjects). 7 subjects complained that the remuneration was inadequate. Conclusions: The main incentive to participation in research bronchoscopy was access to healthcare. Informed consent and procedure technique were adequate but subjects would value more feedback about individual and project results.
    • Maltreatment history, trauma symptoms and research reactivity among adolescents in child protection services

      Randall Waechter; Dilesha Kumanayaka; Colleen Angus-Yamada; Christine Wekerle; Savanah Smith; The MAP Research Team (BMC, 2019-03-01)
      Abstract Objective There is a well-documented link between child maltreatment and poor health across the lifespan. This provides a strong case for ongoing research with youth involved in the child welfare system to reduce negative outcomes and support resilience while being inclusive of youth voices. However, detailed inquiries about maltreatment history and health consequences may cause re-experiencing of events and psychological distress for study participants. Data that accounts for different contexts, such as severity of maltreatment history and current trauma symptomatology, have been limited in considering the question of potential harms to youth who participate in research—especially longitudinal studies. Methods This study compared self-reported impact of research participation against maltreatment history and current post-traumatic stress symptomatology among a randomly selected group of adolescents (&lt; 18 years old) in the child protection service (CPS) system. Results Adolescents who report more serious child maltreatment and current trauma symptom severity reported higher scores on distress questions from pre- to post-assessment participation. Critically, participants who were more negatively impacted by study involvement also reported greater benefit from study involvement. Conclusion The increase in both negative and positive impact does not shift the risk/reward ratio for participation, as risks alone do not increase for this vulnerable group of CPS involved youth. These results are consistent with previous findings from studies involving non-CPS populations and underlies the importance of empirical data to address the question of change in the risk/reward ratio and what factors might play a role in any change. This information can inform inclusion/exclusion criteria for future research with these vulnerable populations, thereby reducing the risk of distress among study participants.
    • Maltreatment history, trauma symptoms and research reactivity among adolescents in child protection services

      Waechter, R., Kumanayaka, D., Angus-Yamada, C., Wekerle, C., & Smith, S. (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, 2019-03-25)
      There is a well-documented link between child maltreatment and poor health across the lifespan. This provides a strong case for ongoing research with youth involved in the child welfare system to reduce negative outcomes and support resilience while being inclusive of youth voices. However, detailed inquiries about maltreatment history and health consequences may cause re-experiencing of events and psychological distress for study participants. Data that accounts for different contexts, such as severity of maltreatment history and current trauma symptomatology, have been limited in considering the question of potential harms to youth who participate in research—especially longitudinal studies.&#xd; &#xd; Methods&#xd; This study compared self-reported impact of research participation against maltreatment history and current post-traumatic stress symptomatology among a randomly selected group of adolescents (&lt; 18 years old) in the child protection service (CPS) system.&#xd; &#xd; Results&#xd; Adolescents who report more serious child maltreatment and current trauma symptom severity reported higher scores on distress questions from pre- to post-assessment participation. Critically, participants who were more negatively impacted by study involvement also reported greater benefit from study involvement.&#xd; &#xd; Conclusion&#xd; The increase in both negative and positive impact does not shift the risk/reward ratio for participation, as risks alone do not increase for this vulnerable group of CPS involved youth. These results are consistent with previous findings from studies involving non-CPS populations and underlies the importance of empirical data to address the question of change in the risk/reward ratio and what factors might play a role in any change. This information can inform inclusion/exclusion criteria for future research with these vulnerable populations, thereby reducing the risk of distress among study participants.