• Waiver of Consent for Emergency Research

      McRae, Andrew D.; Weijer, Charles (Scholarship@Western, 2004-09-01)
    • Waiver of Consent for Emergency Research

      McRae, Andrew D.; Weijer, Charles (SelectedWorks, 2004-09-01)
    • Waiver of individual patient consent in research: when do potential benefits to the community outweigh private rights?

      Zeps, Nikolajs; Iacopetta, Barry J.; Schofield, Lyn; George, Jillian M.; Goldblatt, Jack (2011-07-12)
    • Waiver of individual patient consent in research: when do potential benefits to the community outweigh private rights?

      Zeps, Nikolajs; Iacopetta, Barry J.; Schofield, Lyn; George, Jillian M.; Goldblatt, Jack (2011-07-12)
    • Waiver of Informed Consent for Emergency Research

      Berg, Jessica Wilen (Case Western Reserve University School of Law Scholarly Commons, 1997-01-01)
      Informed consent is both a legal and ethical doctrine. As an ethical doctrine, informed consent is based upon western notions of privacy and autonomy. Individuals are thought to have an interest both in freedom from governmental interference in their lives and in freedom from bodily intrusion.
    • Waiver of Informed Consent in Prehospital Emergency Health Research in Australia

      Morgans, Amee (2016-01-09)
      Informed consent is a vital part of ethical research. In emergency health care research environments such as ambulance services and emergency departments, it is sometimes necessary to conduct trial interventions or observations without patient consent. At times where treatment is time critical, it may be impossible or inappropriate to seek consent from next of kin. Emergency medicine is one of the few areas where the process of informed consent can be waived to allow research to proceed without patient consent. This article will explore the ethics of informed consent in the prehospital emergency research context. This will include an overview of current Australian guidelines for ethical research, and recent changes in law internationally which have affected the conduct of international emergency health research. An overview of the ethical reasoning behind the waiver of informed consent in emergency research is presented, also addressing issues relating to emergency health research such as proxy consent, unconscious patients, and patient decision making capacity. The unusual circumstances encountered in the prehospital ambulance environment will also be discussed, including the dependent and coercive relationship between patients and ambulance professionals, and a lack of alternatives for care and transport for patients who refuse consent. The conflict arising from differences in medical culture and values between patients and health care professionals will also briefly be discussed. It will be argued that, while emergency care research should not require informed consent due to the restrictions of time and dependent nature of the relationship between patient and health professional, emergency health researchers still have a responsibility to consider the patients' perspective when considering the ethical issues of an emergency research project, particularly in the prehospital environment.
    • Waiver of informed consent in prehospital emergency health research in Australia

      Morgans, Amee (Monash University, 2010)
      "Informed consent is a vital part of ethical research. In emergency health care research environments such as ambulance services and emergency departments, it is sometimes necessary to conduct trial interventions or observations without patient consent. At times where treatment is time critical, it may be impossible or inappropriate to seek consent from next of kin. Emergency medicine is one of the few areas where the process of informed consent can be waived to allow research to proceed without patient consent. This article will explore the ethics of informed consent in the prehospital emergency research context. This will include an overview of current Australian guidelines for ethical research, and recent changes in law internationally which have affected the conduct of international emergency health research. An overview of the ethical reasoning behind the waiver of informed consent in emergency research is presented, also addressing issues relating to emergency health research such as proxy consent, unconscious patients, and patient decision making capacity. The unusual circumstances encountered in the prehospital ambulance environment will also be discussed, including the dependent and coercive relationship between patients and ambulance professionals, and a lack of alternatives for care and transport for patients who refuse consent. The conflict arising from differences in medical culture and values between patients and health care professionals will also briefly be discussed. It will be argued that, while emergency care research should not require informed consent due to the restrictions of time and dependent nature of the relationship between patient and health professional, emergency health researchers still have a responsibility to consider the patients’ perspective when considering the ethical issues of an emergency research project, particularly in the prehospital environment"
    • Wallace Stevens and the Lacanian Ethics of Desire

      Passages XX-XXI (XXI); Université Lumière - Lyon 2 (UL2); Nesme, Axel (HAL CCSD, 2010-09)
      International audience
    • Wanted—Egg Donors for Research: A Research Ethics Approach to Donor Recruitment and Compensation

      Sheryl de Lacey; Angela Ballantyne (Indiana University Press, 2009-04-13)
      International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics - Volume 1, Number 2, Fall 2008
    • (Wanting to do) Ethical research in a shifting context

      Bergen University College; Eikset , Andrea; Fosse , Trude; Lange , Troels; Lie , Johan; Lossius , Magni ,; Meaney , Tamsin; Severina , Elena (HAL CCSD, 2017-02-01)
      International audience
    • WARF's stem cell patents and tensions between public and private sector approaches to research.

      Golden, John M (2011-07-12)
      While society debates whether and how to use public funds to support work on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), many scientific groups and businesses debate a different question - the extent to which patents that cover such stem cells should be permitted to limit or to tax their research. The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), a non-profit foundation that manages intellectual property generated by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, owns three patents that have been at the heart of the latter controversy The story of WARF's patents and the controversy they have fostered highlights not only continuing tensions between proprietary and nonproprietary approaches to developing science and technology, but also an at least partly reassuring capacity of public and private sectors to deal with those tensions in a way that can render them substantially manageable, and frequently more manageable as a technology matures. More particularly, the cumulative story of WARF's patents features three leitmotifs that suggest how an attentive and engaged public sector might commonly succeed in working with public and private sector actors to achieve workable balances between proprietary rights and more general social interests: (1) right holders' decisions to pursue less than full rights assertion or enforcement; (2) the ability of government and other public sector actors to help bring about such decisions through co-option or pressure; and (3) the frequent availability or development of technological alternatives that limit research bottlenecks.
    • WARF's stem cell patents and tensions between public and private sector approaches to research.

      Golden, John M (2011-07-12)
      While society debates whether and how to use public funds to support work on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), many scientific groups and businesses debate a different question - the extent to which patents that cover such stem cells should be permitted to limit or to tax their research. The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), a non-profit foundation that manages intellectual property generated by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, owns three patents that have been at the heart of the latter controversy The story of WARF's patents and the controversy they have fostered highlights not only continuing tensions between proprietary and nonproprietary approaches to developing science and technology, but also an at least partly reassuring capacity of public and private sectors to deal with those tensions in a way that can render them substantially manageable, and frequently more manageable as a technology matures. More particularly, the cumulative story of WARF's patents features three leitmotifs that suggest how an attentive and engaged public sector might commonly succeed in working with public and private sector actors to achieve workable balances between proprietary rights and more general social interests: (1) right holders' decisions to pursue less than full rights assertion or enforcement; (2) the ability of government and other public sector actors to help bring about such decisions through co-option or pressure; and (3) the frequent availability or development of technological alternatives that limit research bottlenecks.
    • WASP (write a scientific paper): The ethical stages of publishing a research paper

      Pierre Mallia (Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications, 2019-01-01)
      Background: Authors have to be aware of the ethical stages in writing a scientific paper in order to be cognizant of what is required of them as researchers. The research ethics committee concerns itself with patient protection and therefore looks closely not only at the protocol, but also at the informed consent process and data protection issues. Conversely the publishers has ethical issues of their own relating to their reputation in publishing ethically sound and justified studies. Materials/Methods: The article describes the ethics required of the research by looking at documents and directives which describe the ethical duties of the research, the functions of Research Ethics Committee and Publishing Ethics. Results: The Researcher should be familiar with the informed consent process and data protection for research and the requirements of the research ethics committee. The informed consent process involves discussion of the research, the risks, the requirements from the patient/ participant and issues related with data protection. The second stage is that of the research ethics committee. This committee reviews the proposal and protocol of the research and any updates after the research approval. RECs are much concerned with the informed consent process and what is to be said to patients/participants. Any precautions or arrangement for vulnerable groups should be identified. RECs move according to research ethics guidelines and are objective in their response. The final stage is the ethics of publication. The editor of a journal must ensure that ethics review has been made and ascertain as much as possible any conflicting or competing interests on the part of the researcher/s. The issue of identity of reviewers of the paper is also discussed. Conclusion: The ethics of publication involves various ethical stages, each having their own responsibility towards patients and the scientific community.