• Wanted—Egg Donors for Research: A Research Ethics Approach to Donor Recruitment and Compensation

      Sheryl de Lacey; Angela Ballantyne (Indiana University Press, 2009-04-13)
      International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics - Volume 1, Number 2, Fall 2008
    • (Wanting to do) Ethical research in a shifting context

      Bergen University College; Eikset , Andrea; Fosse , Trude; Lange , Troels; Lie , Johan; Lossius , Magni ,; Meaney , Tamsin; Severina , Elena (HAL CCSD, 2017-02-01)
      International audience
    • WARF's stem cell patents and tensions between public and private sector approaches to research.

      Golden, John M (2011-07-12)
      While society debates whether and how to use public funds to support work on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), many scientific groups and businesses debate a different question - the extent to which patents that cover such stem cells should be permitted to limit or to tax their research. The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), a non-profit foundation that manages intellectual property generated by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, owns three patents that have been at the heart of the latter controversy The story of WARF's patents and the controversy they have fostered highlights not only continuing tensions between proprietary and nonproprietary approaches to developing science and technology, but also an at least partly reassuring capacity of public and private sectors to deal with those tensions in a way that can render them substantially manageable, and frequently more manageable as a technology matures. More particularly, the cumulative story of WARF's patents features three leitmotifs that suggest how an attentive and engaged public sector might commonly succeed in working with public and private sector actors to achieve workable balances between proprietary rights and more general social interests: (1) right holders' decisions to pursue less than full rights assertion or enforcement; (2) the ability of government and other public sector actors to help bring about such decisions through co-option or pressure; and (3) the frequent availability or development of technological alternatives that limit research bottlenecks.
    • WARF's stem cell patents and tensions between public and private sector approaches to research.

      Golden, John M (2011-07-12)
      While society debates whether and how to use public funds to support work on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), many scientific groups and businesses debate a different question - the extent to which patents that cover such stem cells should be permitted to limit or to tax their research. The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), a non-profit foundation that manages intellectual property generated by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, owns three patents that have been at the heart of the latter controversy The story of WARF's patents and the controversy they have fostered highlights not only continuing tensions between proprietary and nonproprietary approaches to developing science and technology, but also an at least partly reassuring capacity of public and private sectors to deal with those tensions in a way that can render them substantially manageable, and frequently more manageable as a technology matures. More particularly, the cumulative story of WARF's patents features three leitmotifs that suggest how an attentive and engaged public sector might commonly succeed in working with public and private sector actors to achieve workable balances between proprietary rights and more general social interests: (1) right holders' decisions to pursue less than full rights assertion or enforcement; (2) the ability of government and other public sector actors to help bring about such decisions through co-option or pressure; and (3) the frequent availability or development of technological alternatives that limit research bottlenecks.
    • WASP (write a scientific paper): The ethical stages of publishing a research paper

      Pierre Mallia (Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications, 2019-01-01)
      Background: Authors have to be aware of the ethical stages in writing a scientific paper in order to be cognizant of what is required of them as researchers. The research ethics committee concerns itself with patient protection and therefore looks closely not only at the protocol, but also at the informed consent process and data protection issues. Conversely the publishers has ethical issues of their own relating to their reputation in publishing ethically sound and justified studies. Materials/Methods: The article describes the ethics required of the research by looking at documents and directives which describe the ethical duties of the research, the functions of Research Ethics Committee and Publishing Ethics. Results: The Researcher should be familiar with the informed consent process and data protection for research and the requirements of the research ethics committee. The informed consent process involves discussion of the research, the risks, the requirements from the patient/ participant and issues related with data protection. The second stage is that of the research ethics committee. This committee reviews the proposal and protocol of the research and any updates after the research approval. RECs are much concerned with the informed consent process and what is to be said to patients/participants. Any precautions or arrangement for vulnerable groups should be identified. RECs move according to research ethics guidelines and are objective in their response. The final stage is the ethics of publication. The editor of a journal must ensure that ethics review has been made and ascertain as much as possible any conflicting or competing interests on the part of the researcher/s. The issue of identity of reviewers of the paper is also discussed. Conclusion: The ethics of publication involves various ethical stages, each having their own responsibility towards patients and the scientific community.
    • Ways Forward for Research Ethics Review

      Nicholson, Richard (2015-05-05)
    • We Should Reject Passive Resignation in Favor of Requiring the Assent of Younger Children for Participation in Nonbeneficial Research

      Nelson, Robert M.; Reynolds, William W. (The MIT Press, 2003-12-11)
      The American Journal of Bioethics - Volume 3, Number 4, Fall 2003
    • Web bounty hunters chase research patients

      McGowan, Kathleen (2011-07-12)
      patents news
    • Web bounty hunters chase research patients

      McGowan, Kathleen (2011-07-12)
      patents news
    • Weber’s tragic legacy

      Lebow, Richard Ned (2017-02-01)
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    • Welfare Biology as an Extension of Biology. Interview with Yew-Kwang Ng

      Max Carpendale (LED Edizioni Universitarie, 2015-11-01)
      Yew-Kwang Ng is Winsemius professor in economics at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and emeritus professor at Monash University. He has been a member of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia since 1980, and in 2007 received the highest award (Distinguished Fellow) of the Economic Society of Australia. He has published over two hundred papers in leading journals in economics, as well as in biology, cosmology, mathematics, philosophy, psychology, and sociology. His books include: Welfare Economics; Mesoeconomics: a Micro-Macro Analysis; Social Welfare and Economic Policy; Specialization and Economic Organization; Efficiency, Equality, and Public Policy: with a Case for Higher Public Spending; and Common Mistakes in Economics: by the Public, Students, Economists, and Nobel Laureates. He has been a world leading scholar in welfare economics and mesoeconomics. In 1995 he published a very influential paper Towards Welfare Biology: Evolutionary Economics of Animal Consciousness and Suffering, which launched concern for the situation of animals in the wild and proposed the creation of a new discipline “welfare biology”.
    • Welfur mobile, a mobile application for measurements in farms

      Unité Mixte de Recherches sur les Herbivores - UMR 1213 (UMRH); VetAgro Sup - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur et de recherche en alimentation, santé animale, sciences agronomiques et de l'environnement (VAS)-AgroSup Dijon - Institut National Supérieur des Sciences Agronomiques, de l'Alimentation et de l'Environnement-Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA); Reichstadt, Matthieu; Botreau, Raphaëlle; Gaudron, Yoan (HAL CCSDAcademic Publishers, 2014-09-03)
    • Western aid workers in Cambodian hospitals Ethical, professional and social divergences

      Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS); Centre Asie du Sud-Est (CASE) ; École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS)-Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (Inalco)-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS); Centre Asie du Sud-Est; Guillou, Anne Yvonne (HAL CCSDIP Publishing, 2013)
      International audience
    • What Are Local Issues? The Problem of the Local Review of Research

      Wainwright, P.; Saunders, J. (2016-01-09)
      Local review of research by ethics committees in the UK has long been held to be an important right of the local research ethics committee and, even with the introduction of the European Clinical Trials Directive, the governance arrangements for research ethics committees continue to allow for local review of multicentre studies. There is no requirement for local review in either the European Union directive or in the guidelines on good clinical practice, and there is little evidence of it anywhere else in Europe. The idea that there can be "local", as opposed to "central" ethical issues in research is an interesting one, which raises important issues about the nature of research ethics and ethical review. The aim of this paper is to argue that there are no such things as local issues in research ethics, and suggest that those questions currently addressed as local issues properly belong within the research governance framework.