Show simple item record

dc.contributorMiller, Richard F.
dc.contributorRipple, William
dc.contributorJohnson, Douglas
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-22T11:33:57Z
dc.date.available2019-10-22T11:33:57Z
dc.date.created2016-09-05 23:27
dc.date.issued2012-05-30
dc.identifieroai:ir.library.oregonstate.edu:1957/29440
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/1957/29440
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/717126
dc.description.abstractGraduation date: 2005
dc.description.abstractSince European American settlement of the Intermountain Region,
 dramatic changes in vegetation composition and structure have occurred in the
 sagebrush steppe ecosystem. Western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis spp.
 occidentalis Vasek), although indigenous to the Intermountain Region, has
 increased since the late 1800s. Considerable work has been done documenting
 juniper woodland expansion in the Intermountain West, however, little is known
 about the environmental variables that influence rates of tree establishment and
 structural attributes of woodlands across landscapes. Most studies of western
 juniper have addressed site-specific questions at limited spatial scales.
 Consequently, there is a lack of research on broader scale patterns of woodland
 development occurring across heterogeneous landscapes. In addition, changes in
 the amount, composition, and structure of fuels during the transition from open
 sagebrush steppe communities to closed juniper woodlands have profound
 influences on the size, intensity, frequency, and behavior of fire. However, limited
 data exist quantifying changes in fuels during this transition, thus, consequences to
 fire behavior have been difficult to predict. The major impetus for the study was
 to determine the influence of environmental variables on rates and structural
 attributes of woodland development and associated changes in fuel loading
 characteristics during the transition from sagebrush steppe communities to closed
 juniper woodlands in the High Desert and Humboldt ecological provinces. The
 proportion of trees greater than 150 years old relative to trees less than 150 years
 suggest western juniper has greatly expanded in the Owyhee Mountains and on
 Steens Mountain since settlement of the areas. Ninety-five percent of the trees
 established after the 1850s. As evidenced by the presence of western juniper in
 96% of plots sampled in this study, juniper is able to encroach upon a variety of
 plant alliances and under a broad range of environmental conditions over diverse
 landscapes. Although it appears the occurrence of western juniper within the
 woodland belt is not spatially limited by environmental or vegetative conditions,
 stand structural and fuel loading characteristics do vary considerably across
 heterogeneous landscapes. Total juniper density, density of dominant trees
 comprising the primary canopy, and certain live and dead fuels biomass very
 substantially with site potential. Spatial variation in stand structure and fuels may
 have significant implications to management of juniper at the landscape scale.
dc.languageen_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.titleThe influence of environmental attributes on temporal and structural dynamics of western juniper woodland development and associated fuel loading characteristics
dc.typeThesis/Dissertation
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10255594
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/10255594
ge.lastmodificationdate2016-09-05 23:27
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148900
ge.oai.repositoryid6935
ge.oai.streamid5
ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
ge.setspecglobetheolib
ge.linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/1957/29440


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record