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dc.contributor.authorGándara, Patricia
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-22T11:40:04Z
dc.date.available2019-10-22T11:40:04Z
dc.date.created2016-09-05 23:29
dc.date.issued2007-02-13
dc.identifieroai:qt8z96d9rw
dc.identifieroai:qt8z96d9rw
dc.identifierhttp://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/8z96d9rw
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/720694
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the potential of Multiple Pathways as a strategy for improving the educational outcomes of immigrant and English Learner students and better preparing them for career and college opportunities. For most immigrants and English Learners, education, as it is currently structured, is not a vehicle of upward social mobility and the schools leave many behind. Many observers of these trends argue that another model of schooling needs to be considered. Immigrant and EL students generally have weak academic preparation in part because of their personal circumstances and in part because of the schools’ inability to meet their needs. They have language development needs that are unmet, are segregated and isolated in the least stimulating classes in the poorest schools, and are exposed to few postsecondary options. They have limited aspirations and little knowledge of how to plan for postsecondary schooling or entering the workforce. Some suffer from lack of legal documentation and many feel uncomfortable in school as though they “don’t belong.” Others feel ignored or discriminated against by other students, and most see few models of upward educational or job mobility. In low-income circumstances where families immigrate to find work, the pressure to be a contributing member of the family can be intense. Moreover, even if schools were able to provide the needed courses and supports for educational success, many of these students would still require more time to accomplish the cultural, linguistic, and academic tasks necessary to allow them to graduate from high school fully prepared for the workforce or for postsecondary education. Broad and fundamental reform is required to create schools that could meet these students’ needs. A Multiple Pathways strategy may be able to open doors to higher educational attainment and higher paying jobs. A curriculum that incorporates both academic and career technical education may be especially relevant to English Learners and immigrant students. The opportunity to learn and demonstrate learning by doing—hands-on, project and portfolio type activities—has been shown to improve the exam pass rates for English Learners. Moreover, cooperative learning strategies and project-based curricula scaffold instruction for students who have not yet fully mastered English. The opportunity to extend courses into the community with persons who also have knowledge of students’ language and culture can constitute additional human capital resources for these students. The potential of these models (that provide an integrated curriculum and off-site learning experiences) are many, including the provision of meaningful coursework, increased participation of some parents who can more easily support skill-based learning, and opportunities to “earn while they learn.” Additionally, Multiple Pathways could make available strong models of English and opportunities to use emerging English language skills in ecologically meaningful ways, provide greater exposure to career opportunities, and provide more flexible schedules through off-site learning experiences. Of course, Multiple Pathways also presents many challenges for immigrant and EL students, principally the concern that they will, once again, be channeled into the least prestigious and remunerative settings. However, while there are clearly hazards in attempting to construct Multiple Pathways to educate English Learner and immigrant students, it appears that there would be more benefits than liabilities with such an approach. If students can be engaged in meaningful activity, learn about workforce opportunities, and prepare for a postsecondary education and a college degree, school could become more compelling for students who have traditionally felt and been marginalized. Perhaps the greatest advantage of Multiple Pathways would be to demonstrate that immigrant students and English Learners can succeed in school given the opportunity. Successful implementation would demonstrate that immigrant students and English Learners can produce significant returns on the investment we must make in them.
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf
dc.languageenglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publishereScholarship, University of California
dc.rightspublic
dc.sourceGándara, Patricia. (2007). Multiple Pathways for Immigrant and English Learner Students. UCLA's Institute for Democracy, Education, & Access. UCLA: UCLA's Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access. Retrieved from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/8z96d9rw
dc.subjectpathways
dc.subjectimmigrant students
dc.subjectenglish learner
dc.subjectenglish learner students
dc.subjectel students
dc.subjectell students
dc.titleMultiple Pathways for Immigrant and English Learner Students
dc.typeArticle
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10260019
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/10260019
ge.lastmodificationdate2016-09-05 23:29
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148900
ge.oai.repositoryid2701
ge.oai.streamid5
ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
ge.setspecglobetheolib
ge.linkhttp://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/8z96d9rw


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