• 50 short case studies in business management

      Kumar M., Dileep (UUM Press, 2012)
      The Higher Education Institutions that run business management programs in Malaysia is under severe criticism from industry that the passing out management graduates do not have adequate practical exposure to the industry and lack of practical skills to deal industrial issues proactively as the catalyst of change.This indicates that the traditional management education curriculum, as presently constituted, may not be adequately preparing individuals for the challenges they experience as professional managers.To deal with this issue, many management institutes are adopting case study as a pedagogy, a hypothetical or actual business situation to formulate a recommended policy or decision based on the facts and figures provided, to induce practical exposure to the students by simulating case situations, which improve students analytical skills and decision-making skills.A case study in business management course is a rigorous analysis of an incident, situation, person, crisis or any such phenomenon or concept, in relation to industry, business or people in the organisations.It is well related to the management, process or methodology adopted by the organisation stressing analysis of chain of events for better change management in relation to business operation context. The case studies included in this book provides better perspective of various issues and situations in the business field.The cases are written from the field of Organisational Behaviour, Human Resource Management, Marketing, Business Ethics, International Business, Strategic Management, Business Laws and General Management. These case studies are to be thoroughly analyzed by the faculty members before applying that into the classroom. It is expected that the faculty members should refer to the similar case scenarios at local and international levels to stimulate students to have better discussion on the multifaceted issues or situation. Instead of a direct entry into theoretical concepts, the author suggests that the faculty members distribute these cases well in advance and invite students to come for creative discussions and practical solutions.By preparing solutions to case studies, the students will be exposed to a variety of business operations, business process, management roles, and business situations.Thus the case studies can adequately integrate theoretical concepts effortlessly in realistic situations with better referential skills.The 50 cases included in this book can extremely be valuable in preparing students a career in industry by giving better chance to develop analytical and decision-making skills in the classroom that meet up the challenges of industry.
    • 50 short case study

      Kumar, Dileep (UUM Press, 2012)
      The Higher Education Institutions that run business management programs in Malaysia is under severe criticism from industry that the passing out management graduates do not have adequate practical exposure to the industry and lack of practical skills to deal industrial issues proactively as the catalyst of change.This indicates that the traditional management education curriculum, as presently constituted, may not be adequately preparing individuals for the challenges they experience as professional managers.To deal with this issue, many management institutes are adopting case study as a pedagogy, a hypothetical or actual business situation to formulate a recommended policy or decision based on the facts and figures provided, to induce practical exposure to the students by simulating case situations, which improve students analytical skills and decision-making skills.A case study in business management course is a rigorous analysis of an incident, situation, person, crisis or any such phenomenon or concept, in relation to industry, business or people in the organisations.It is well related to the management, process or methodology adopted by the organisation stressing analysis of chain of events for better change management in relation to business operation context.The case studies included in this book provides better perspective of various issues and situations in the business field.The cases are written from the field of Organisational Behaviour, Human Resource Management, Marketing, Business Ethics, International Business, Strategic Management, Business Laws and General Management. These case studies are to be thoroughly analyzed by the faculty members before applying that into the classroom.It is expected that the faculty members should refer to the similar case scenarios at local and international levels to stimulate students to have better discussion on the multifaceted issues or situation.Instead of a direct entry into theoretical concepts, the author suggests that the faculty members distribute these cases well in advance and invite students to come for creative discussions and practical solutions.By preparing solutions to case studies, the students will be exposed to a variety of business operations, business process, management roles, and business situations.Thus the case studies can adequately integrate theoretical concepts effortlessly in realistic situations with better referential skills. The 50 cases included in this book can extremely be valuable in preparing students a career in industry by giving better chance to develop analytical and decision-making skills in the classroom that meet up the challenges of industry.
    • A beacon of stability in a sea of unrest: the case of Pharmakina in the DRC

      Birkenhäger, Bastian (Global Compact, 2006)
      "PHARMAKINA s.c.a.r.l. is a pharmaceutical company with headquarters in Bukavu in war torn eastern DR Congo. On a profitable basis the company produces quinine salts for the global market and Malaria and Aids medicines for the domestic market. The company is known for its extensive community engagement. The company is aspiring to join the United Nations Global Compact. In this context the company has declared its willingness to act as “case subject” for this business case study and to make available the necessary resources. There are two main challenges to be explored in this case study: 1) how to run a business successfully in a conflict area, including security issues, and 2) how to uphold (as much as is practicable) good corporate citizenship ideals – such as the UNGC principles – in a conflict area where also extreme poverty is found. This case study will address the hypothesis that these two challenges involve trade-offs and can seemingly not be met simultaneously. For example, because community engagement mostly involves extra costs, activities in this field are detrimental to profit levels, the maximization of which is the primary goal for any company. This case study will deal mainly with issues of community engagement, given the fact that a cross-cutting theme that ties in the issues related to 1) surviving as a business in a place like the DRC and 2) simultaneously abiding by UNGC principles is that of community engagement. Some pertinent questions to be addressed in this case study are: ® How did PHARMAKINA meet the seemingly conflicting challenges? ® What are PHARMAKINAs activities in the field of community engagement? ® Why does PHARMAKINA engage in community engagement? ® Is community engagement essential for the survival of a company like PHARMAKINA in a conflict zone? ® What is the impact of PHARMAKINA on the immediate community? ® Is there a discernable impact of PHARMAKINA on the on-going conflict? ® What could be regarded as PHARMAKINAs innovative solutions regarding the challenges? ® What are some of the key lessons that can be learnt? It will be seen that some of the most important key lessons were: · Without PHARMAKINAs both intensive and extensive community engagement PHARMAKINA probably wouldn’t have survived in this conflict zone. · As a company doing business in a conflict zone one must be prepared to try and maintain good relationships with all parties, even when some of them could be considered to be war criminals under normal circumstances. The Global Compact principle that is most relevant in this context of conflict and extreme poverty is Principle 1: Business should support and respect the protection of internationally proclaimed human rights. The case study is to be prepared under the broad theme: “Business and Community Engagement”, one of four themes focussed on during the Regional Learning Forum Meeting of the United Nations Global Compact Regional Learning Forum, to be held in Accra, Ghana from November 22-24, 2006."
    • A case for Truth

      Hanson, Kirk O. (Markkula Center, 2003-09)
      A public relations professional is asked to counsel the local Roman Catholic Archdiocese on how to respond to the sex abuse crisis.
    • A case study examination of managerial activities in four UK trade unions formed by merger

      Cranfield University; Brewster, Chris; Dempsey, Michael (2004)
      In 1985, the researcher took up employment in what he regarded as a senior management position as Assistant General Secretary (Administration) of NALGO, the public service union. The objective was to gain management experience alongside continuing management education. Whilst there were others seeking to manage to the best of their ability, the idea was not universally accepted. However, the union, by the end of the decade, had embarked on management development courses for senior managers and by the time it merged and became part of UNISON, managerial activities were visible in many areas. It was not, however, clear the extent to which – if at all – such phenomena were observable in other trade unions. The literature did not help in this respect. Research to establish whether trade union managers existed and, if so, what their roles were appeared to offer the prospect of examining a new area of trade union life. This research is based on interviews with 56 senior trade union staff in four trade unions formed by merger – CWU, PCS, UNiFI and UNISON. Only one of those individuals professed not to accept a managerial role and that person accepted that he had a responsibility to ensure that the union was managed. Original findings include the following:- • There is a category of employee in trade unions known as a ‘trade union manager’, a role not previously identified by empirical research and discussed in the literature. • Trade union management develops depending on the level of institutional support. In the case study unions, there were links between this and the stage of merger that the unions had reached. Prior to institutional acceptance, there are managers who do their best to manage, operating in something of a cocoon. • Trade union managers espouse trade union principles which include the notion of fairness, imputing a concern for the way people are treated, including the staff for whom they are responsible. • Management remains in many ways a problematic concept in trade unions, leading often to its undervaluation. Trade union managers may perceive that it involves the exercise of power of the powerless, judgment on the weak. Trade union managers may as a result be ambivalent at being judgmental and, consequently, at managing conduct or performance. • Trade union managers manage stakeholders in polyarchal organisations but boundaries with lay activists are unclear; they engage in contests to define those boundaries and to manage what they regard as their own responsibilities. • Boundaries may include those relating to conflictual relations, constitutional boundaries, moveable boundaries, staff boundaries and policy/political boundaries.
    • A Case study examination of managerial activities in four UK trade unions formed by merger

      Brewster, Chris (supervisor); Dempsey, Michael (School of Management, 2005-11-23)
      In 1985, the researcher took up employment in what he regarded as a senior management position as Assistant General Secretary (Administration) of NALGO, the public service union. The objective was to gain management experience alongside continuing management education. Whilst there were others seeking to manage to the best of their ability, the idea was not universally accepted. However, the union, by the end of the decade, had embarked on management development courses for senior managers and by the time it merged and became part of UNISON, managerial activities were visible in many areas. It was not, however, clear the extent to which – if at all – such phenomena were observable in other trade unions. The literature did not help in this respect. Research to establish whether trade union managers existed and, if so, what their roles were appeared to offer the prospect of examining a new area of trade union life. This research is based on interviews with 56 senior trade union staff in four trade unions formed by merger – CWU, PCS, UNiFI and UNISON. Only one of those individuals professed not to accept a managerial role and that person accepted that he had a responsibility to ensure that the union was managed. Original findings include the following:- • There is a category of employee in trade unions known as a ‘trade union manager’, a role not previously identified by empirical research and discussed in the literature. • Trade union management develops depending on the level of institutional support. In the case study unions, there were links between this and the stage of merger that the unions had reached. Prior to institutional acceptance, there are managers who do their best to manage, operating in something of a cocoon. • Trade union managers espouse trade union principles which include the notion of fairness, imputing a concern for the way people are treated, including the staff for whom they are responsible. • Management remains in many ways a problematic concept in trade unions, leading often to its undervaluation. Trade union managers may perceive that it involves the exercise of power of the powerless, judgment on the weak. Trade union managers may as a result be ambivalent at being judgmental and, consequently, at managing conduct or performance. • Trade union managers manage stakeholders in polyarchal organisations but boundaries with lay activists are unclear; they engage in contests to define those boundaries and to manage what they regard as their own responsibilities. • Boundaries may include those relating to conflictual relations, constitutional boundaries, moveable boundaries, staff boundaries and policy/political boundaries.
    • A Case study examination of managerial activities in four UK trade unions formed by merger

      Brewster, Chris; Dempsey, Michael (Cranfield UniversitySchool of Management, 2005-11-23)
      In 1985, the researcher took up employment in what he regarded as a senior management position as Assistant General Secretary (Administration) of NALGO, the public service union. The objective was to gain management experience alongside continuing management education. Whilst there were others seeking to manage to the best of their ability, the idea was not universally accepted. However, the union, by the end of the decade, had embarked on management development courses for senior managers and by the time it merged and became part of UNISON, managerial activities were visible in many areas. It was not, however, clear the extent to which – if at all – such phenomena were observable in other trade unions. The literature did not help in this respect. Research to establish whether trade union managers existed and, if so, what their roles were appeared to offer the prospect of examining a new area of trade union life. This research is based on interviews with 56 senior trade union staff in four trade unions formed by merger – CWU, PCS, UNiFI and UNISON. Only one of those individuals professed not to accept a managerial role and that person accepted that he had a responsibility to ensure that the union was managed. Original findings include the following:- • There is a category of employee in trade unions known as a ‘trade union manager’, a role not previously identified by empirical research and discussed in the literature. • Trade union management develops depending on the level of institutional support. In the case study unions, there were links between this and the stage of merger that the unions had reached. Prior to institutional acceptance, there are managers who do their best to manage, operating in something of a cocoon. • Trade union managers espouse trade union principles which include the notion of fairness, imputing a concern for the way people are treated, including the staff for whom they are responsible. • Management remains in many ways a problematic concept in trade unions, leading often to its undervaluation. Trade union managers may perceive that it involves the exercise of power of the powerless, judgment on the weak. Trade union managers may as a result be ambivalent at being judgmental and, consequently, at managing conduct or performance. • Trade union managers manage stakeholders in polyarchal organisations but boundaries with lay activists are unclear; they engage in contests to define those boundaries and to manage what they regard as their own responsibilities. • Boundaries may include those relating to conflictual relations, constitutional boundaries, moveable boundaries, staff boundaries and policy/political boundaries.
    • A Case Study in Corporate Responsibility: Removal of Tobacco Products by CVS Health

      Delaney, Suzanne; Droopad, Debra Ann; Droopad, Debra Ann (The University of Arizona., 2015-10-05)
      Many companies are investing in improving business ethics and corporate social responsibility, because it enhances their reputations and creates a better environment for their stakeholders. One example is CVS Health that recently made a decision to remove tobacco products from all of the stores. In order to understand the reasoning behind this strategy and the ramifications of this decision, one must explore the overview of the company along with its history, industry analysis, and business model. This study analyzes the ethics and corporate social responsibility by applying the methods of utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, maximization of profits, moral minimum, stakeholder interests, and corporate citizenship. Also, the competitive advantage of CVS Health is described in comparison to the competitors such as Walgreens and Rite Aid with their reactions.
    • A Case Study in Corporate Responsibility: Removal of Tobacco Products by CVS Health

      Delaney, Suzanne; Droopad, Debra Ann (The University of Arizona., 2015)
      Many companies are investing in improving business ethics and corporate social responsibility, because it enhances their reputations and creates a better environment for their stakeholders. One example is CVS Health that recently made a decision to remove tobacco products from all of the stores. In order to understand the reasoning behind this strategy and the ramifications of this decision, one must explore the overview of the company along with its history, industry analysis, and business model. This study analyzes the ethics and corporate social responsibility by applying the methods of utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, maximization of profits, moral minimum, stakeholder interests, and corporate citizenship. Also, the competitive advantage of CVS Health is described in comparison to the competitors such as Walgreens and Rite Aid with their reactions.
    • A Case Study in Corporate Social Responsibility

      Sharon K. Kendrick; Mark Kendrick; Anastasiya Saakova (IEECA, 2014-03-01)
      <p class="JIASSKeywords">This case study promotes analysis through a brief investigation into the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the operation of a multinational corporation as evidenced by Google, Inc. The study focuses on a transnational company in order to observe the impact of CSR practice on a global level. The study will present implications of CSR for corporate management, corporate employees, state regulators, shareholders, and customers in general. In addition, the study will discuss consequences of poor CSR compliance for a multinational corporation. Questions for analysis include implications of CSR, employee retention, development of corporate culture, and evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of different CSR approaches. Upon conclusion of the study, suggestions are made for future collaborative efforts in corporate social responsibility as applied to psychological, sociological, and economical motives. Recruiting and training possibilities also present partnership opportunities for best practice sharing in regards to community, civic, and service engagement.</p>
    • A Case Study in Sri Lanka : Problems and Possibilities for Sri Lankas Textile Industry

      Jansson, Sofie; Persson, Lovisa (Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomiHögskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi, 2015)
      The competitive advantages of Sri Lanka's garment industry, and how these can lead to increased trade with Swedish companies, were examined through a study divided in two main parts. The research was carried out with a focus on the labour force and the social aspects of CSR. It was initiated in Sweden, where the goal was to investigate how Swedish companies select suppliers and what their requirements are in terms of code of conduct and social responsibility. In the following part of the study we examined the corresponding parts of Sri Lanka's garment industry. To identify the competitive advantages and potential problems, we conducted a study on three different factories in the country, where the owners, managers and workers were interviewed. To further expand the survey results we also interviewed additional stakeholders to the industry. In this case a trade union and an organization working in the garment industry. The collected data were analysed using selected parts of Porter's diamond and Carroll's CSR pyramid, as well as the Swedish companies' demands on the social aspects of CSR. In order to identify these requirements, interviews were conducted with four different people at the Swedish companies. We were also given access to documents with their code of conduct. Through our analysis we are able to identify the competitive advantages that exist within the industry. In addition to that we are able to identify the areas of the industry where problems exist today, but where Sri Lanka has the opportunity to strengthen its competitive advantages in order to become a more attractive partner for Swedish companies.
    • A Case Study Of Corporate Social Responsibility (Csr) Practices Of Optic Company In Singapore

      Ounnajmi, Noronsalha (2011-05)
      Tanggung jawab sosial korporat (CSR) bertujuan untuk lebih mengintegrasikan masalah
 sosial dan persekitaran ke dalam perniagaan dan menghuraikan secara sukarela.
 
 Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) aims to better integrate social and
 environmental concerns into business outlines on a voluntary basis.
    • A case study of corporate social responsibility by Malaysian government link company

      Abdul Hamid, Fathilatul Zakimi; Atan, Ruhaya; Md Saleh, Md Suhaimi (Elsevier Ltd., 2014)
      The objective of the study is to investigate the CSR practice by the one of the Malaysian Government Link Company via case study approach.As a GLC's the business has to balance its profit with social responsibility to the state and society.According to the literature in modern era of CSR, the business social responsibility starts when the business determines their act in economic and social obligation.The result of the study shows that the business CSR initiative has changed from altruistic to its core competency.Furthermore, its revise CSR agenda has contributed to the state socio-economic development as suggested by the Father of Social Responsibility on the business social obligation postulate.
    • A case study of corporate social responsibility in nashik MIDC

      Tamil, Selvi J; Reena, Patel (Faculty of Management and Commerce South Eastern University of Sri Lanka Oluvil # 32360 Sri Lanka, 2015-07-24)
      771/5" paper analyses Che awareness of corporate social responsibility in Nashik MIDC. It also helps
 to identify the awareness and effectiveness of existing environmental protection programs like
 Carbon emissions and treading among these companies.The study analyses the corporate
 responsibility with respect to Customers, Employees, Government, Environment and Society. The
 study involves opinions of corporate about, problems to implement corporate social responsibility.
 The study also involves case lets of major corporate in India like J K Tyre's, Infosys, Siemens, Tata
 group, Godrej Group, Mahindra And Mahindra and many more that are already implementing
 such programs. The result of the study indicates that in Nashik MIDC, there are few companies
 that are doing programs periodically. However, there are few companies, which feel that they
 cannot do these activities individually but there can be collective efforts. The study concludes that
 in addition to government agencies some management institutes should also take initiatives
 collectively to motivate and run such programs with these companies. It is found that Nashik
 Industrial Manufacturing Association (NIMA) are taking lead and arranging social programs for
 society.Though big Indian companies have started practicing corporate citizenship, the degree to
 which it is belong done is inadequate. Growing awareness among the academic institutions
 towards CSR as a subject, to sensitize the future managers of this nation to the societal needs
 besides generating profits for their organizations with increased efficiency will need a greater
 deal from the managers to do the balancing act.
 Keywords:
    • A Case Study of Ethics and Mutual Funds Mismanagement at Putnam

      Kelly, Eileen P.; Bramhandkar, Alka; Movassaghi, Hormoz (2016-01-08)
    • A Case Study of Micro Businesses in Jelutong Wet Market in Penang, Malaysia: Implications for CSR Scholarship

      Teik Aun Wong; Mohammad Reevany Bustami
      Abstract Scholarship on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has progressed to encompass a variety of theoretical frameworks. The adoption of Stakeholder Theory is prominent with regard to CSR among big businesses but its applicability towards micro and small businesses is contested. Micro and small businesses possess distinct differences most notably their less formal structure and more pronounced indigenous cultural diversity. To expand scholarship on CSR, this research explores the relatively less studied realm of micro businesses or informal businesses. Due to their rudimentary structure, micro businesses normally operate with other organizations, institutions, and each other, and are thus intricately linked with the local community. Hence, this research explores a locality and institution where micro businesses thrive—Jelutong wet market in Penang, Malaysia. This research offers a rare and arguably novel perspective. Firstly, the micro businesses are operating alongside and constantly interacting with each other within the institutional setting of a wet market (“Wet markets” in Malaysia are akin to farmers’ markets in America. They are usually established and operated by the local city or municipal council. Wet markets typically consist of a main market building and the surrounding roads and open areas. Meats, poultry, seafood, and vegetables are usually sold in the main market building that is sheltered. Slaughtering and de-feathering of poultry, and butchering of pork, beef, and lamb are usually conducted at the building premise and the floor is frequently wet hence the term “wet market.” The surrounding roads and open areas usually sell vegetables, fruits, hardware, clothing, toys, street hawker food, economy rice, savories, and a plethora of other goods and services.). Secondly, the said wet market is located in Penang, Malaysia that is highly diverse in terms of ethnicity, culture, religion, language, age, and socio-economics. The fieldwork employs multiple local languages for a high degree of authenticity and richness in data. Thirdly, this research adopts the methodology of phenomenology with a multi-layered approach. The fieldwork consists of thirty (30) primary interviews followed by five (5) verification interviews all conducted in local languages the respondents are most comfortable in expressing themselves, fifteen (15) non-participant observations, and ten (10) participant observations. An abductive research strategy is adopted and first-order constructs in the form of everyday typifications are adduced. The first-order constructs are analyzed along the layers of Carroll’s Pyramid of CSR. Subsequently, the second-order constructs are iteratively analyzed and three (3) typologies on CSR among micro businesses emerged. Finally, the findings from the second-order constructs are superimposed back onto the Pyramid of CSR. A different Pyramid of CSR emerges with fresh insights on the phenomenon of CSR among micro businesses. Retroductive reflection, reasoning, and analysis reveal Social Capital Theory as the most suitable theoretical framework and the implications for CSR scholarship are discussed.