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dc.contributor.authorGerald White
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-23T08:11:21Z
dc.date.available2019-10-23T08:11:21Z
dc.date.created2017-01-05 00:14
dc.date.issued2011-09-16
dc.identifieroai:apo.org.au:26390
dc.identifierhttp://apo.org.au/node/26390
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/765303
dc.description.abstractTechnology enhanced learning has failed but there is still a role for technology to create personal learning spaces writes Gerry White in this research review on DERN. Learning using technology has been fraught with controversy and debate since personal computers became widely available in the early 1980s. Apart from unfounded criticisms that the use of information and communications technologies (ICT) did not increase learning achievement, other issues such as access and equity needed to be resolved. However, common educational practice for using ICT in learning programs has become focussed on converting traditional texts to digital formats and calling these learning objects. The learning objects are centrally managed in repositories and made to conform to standards so that they can be accessed from so called learning management systems. These learning management systems are more about managing content, courses and assignments than learning, and continue to be used for educational control. However, learning is fundamentally social in nature and resides in networks argue Chatti, Agustiawan, Jarke and Specht in an award winning research article titled Toward a Personal Learning Environment Framework Chatti et al. assert that ‘traditional technology-enhanced learning (TEL) initiatives have failed’ (p. 67). They proffer that a reason for failure is that ‘management by the learner is often key to learning (p. 68) and so a core issue in learning is ‘personalization of the learning experience’ (p. 67) rather than a one-size fits-all model. Following a very well researched commentary on lifelong learning, informal learning, personalized learning, network learning, virtual learning environments and personal learning environments, Toward a Personal Learning Environment Framework examines the potential for personal learning environments where learners can design a ‘flexible entry point that enables learner-controlled integration of different learning tools and services into a personalized place' (p. 71). Chatti et al. analyse what is currently available using mashups. A mashup is a ‘Web site that combines content from more than one source (from multiple Web sites) into an integrated experience' (p. 71). Read the full text at DERN - please note access to this article requires a login but registration is free. Editors note: This is the first trial of DERN content on APO. Let us know if you would like APO to carry more of these articles from DERN that always involve login/registration via the comments box (which also requires login) or the contact form below.  Photo: teachernz / flickr
dc.publisherDigital Education Research Network
dc.titleResearch review: Self-directed learning
dc.typeArticle
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10356634
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/10356634
ge.lastmodificationdate2017-01-05 00:14
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148934
ge.oai.repositoryid6094
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttp://apo.org.au/node/26390


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