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  • A Contrapuntal Discipline: Through the Landscape of “Inter-” and “Religious”

    Yuskaev, Timur (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    This essay is offered as an encouragement to continue paying attention to how we do interreligious studies. That is why I pay attention to how my colleagues explain it. I note a proliferation of landscape metaphors that seem oblivious to how landscapes are representations of the power relations that govern societies. What do these metaphors say, I wonder, about some of our conceptual grammar, some of the instincts that subtend and suffuse this discipline? Here, I use “discipline” as practice. My suggestion is for us to stay attuned to relations, the “inter-” in interreligious studies, while appreciating possible dynamics signaled by “-religious.” An emphasis on hearing multiple, often contrapuntally “flowing currents”—concurrent with a refusal to reflexively prioritize one of those clusters of notes—might be of help to those working across the spectrum of interreligious studies. My use of “contrapuntal” relies on Edward Said’s simile of counterpoint, music’s “capacity for plurality of voices.” I stress, through the epigraph, the final note in Said’s last masterpiece, his Out of Place. Freed from the task of speaking from within an academic enclosure, or belonging to a particular vision of humanism, he invigorates his sonic expression by motioning toward clusters and currents that are independent yet somehow related contrapuntally.
  • Afterword

    Mosher, Lucinda (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
  • bell hooks’ Spiritual Vision: Buddhist, Christian, and Feminist: By Nadra Nittle

    Maruggi, Matthew (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    Review: bell hooks’ Spiritual Vision: Buddhist, Christian, and Feminist. By Nadra Nittle. Fortress Press, 2023. 147 pages. $24.00 (paperback). ISBN 9781506488363
  • Nazrul’s Gift: Illustrating the Promise of the Third Space in the Aesthetic Dialogue of Nazrul Islam

    Elizabeth, Rachelle (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    In this paper, I illustrate the power and potential of the third space through the poetry of Nazrul Islam in order to articulate what I argue to be Nazrul’s true legacy: the genuine potential of liminality in the discovery and embracing of difference. In doing so, I seek to clarify Nazrul’s gift as one that offers us the opportunity to examine the ways in which we attach power and privilege to difference and, finally, reflect on the ways in which aesthetics, liminality, and dialogue are necessary for the flourishing of our world. This paper then constitutes a contribution to the interdisciplinary project of aesthetic interreligious dialogue in that it illustrates the kinds of transformation that may be experienced in the liminal spaces those dialogues create. Through Nazrul, we have an opportunity to imagine what impact these dialogues can have on the dialoging individuals and their respective contexts, especially in relation to shared problems such as war and climate change.
  • Religion, Populism, and Modernity: Confronting White Christian Nationalism and Racism: Edited by Atalia Omer and Joshua Lupo

    Jacobs Plaisimond, Shaunesse' (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    Review: Religion, Populism, and Modernity: Confronting White Christian Nationalism and Racism. Edited by Atalia Omer and Joshua Lupo. Contending Modernities. Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2023. ii+302. $125.00 (hardcover); $35.00 (paper); $27.99 (eBook). Paper ISBN 9780268205829
  • What Would Jesus See? Ways of Looking at a Disorienting World: By Aaron Rosen

    Mosher, Lucinda (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    Revew: What Would Jesus See? Ways of Looking at a Disorienting World. By Aaron Rosen. Minneapolis: Broadleaf Books, 2023. x+199 pages. $29.99 (hardcover). ISBN 9781506478654.  
  • With the Best of Intentions: Interreligious Missteps and Mistakes: Edited by Lucinda Mosher, Elinor J. Pierce, and Or N. Rose

    Goodhue, Yhomas (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    Reivew: With the Best of Intentions: Interreligious Missteps and Mistakes. Edited by Lucinda Mosher, Elinor J. Pierce, and Or N. Rose. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 2023. xi+220pp. ISBN 978-1-62698-545-2. $35.00 (paperback) $28.50 (Kindle).
  • “Don’t Let Us Lose This Memory”: American Muslims, American Service

    Hussain, Amir (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    My reflective writing or public speaking often has an accompanying playlist. For this essay, the list features Canadian musician Nancy Reinhold’s poignant song, “This Memory”, and two songs about Muhammad Ali. Their lyrics underscore points I make as I reflect on the reality of American Muslim life and how Muslims have helped to make America the country that it is, including through service and the arts.
  • The Paradox of Trauma and Growth in Pastoral Care: Night Blooming: By Mary Beth Werdel

    Yong, Aizaiah (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    Review: The Paradox of Trauma and Growth in Pastoral Care: Night Blooming. By Mary Beth Werdel. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2024. pp. 113. ISBN 978-1-4985-1993-9. Hardcover, $90.00. e-book, $45.00.
  • Bearing

    Peace, Jennifer (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    Bearing • the manner in which one conducts or carries oneself, posture and gestures • the act, capability, or period of producing or bringing forth • something that is produced • the act of enduring or capacity to endure • reference or relation • a supporting part of a structure • Often bearings, direction or relative position.
  • “How Easily Things Get Broken”: Leonard Bernstein and Oswaldo Golijov on the Body and Blood of Christ

    Valkenberg, Wilhelmus (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    This essay offers a theological interpretation of two musical works on Christian themes by Jewish composers: Leonard Bernstein’s MASS (1971) and Osvaldo Golijov’s La Pasión según San Marcos (2000). My claim in this article is that a comparative theological understanding of living Jewish traditions can enable Christians to understand and appreciate theological implications of the interaction between two Jewish composers and traditional Christian forms of liturgical art, specifically music.
  • Special Issue Introduction: The Art of Interfaith: A Festschrift in Honor of Lucinda Mosher on Interreligious Engagement and the Arts

    Rashid, Hussein (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
  • Three Poems from House Crossing

    Patton, Laurie (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    Indologist and poet Laurie L. Patton, Ph.D., is the seventeenth president of Middlebury College (Vermont). Her many publications on religion, mythology, and literature include Bringing the Gods to Mind: Mantra and Ritual in Early Indian Sacrifice (University of California Press, 2006), Who Owns Religion? Scholars and their Publics in the Late 20th Century (University of Chicago Press, 2019), her translation of The Bhagavad Gita (Penguin Press, 2008), Fire’s Goal: Poems from the Hindu Year (White Clouds Press, 2003), and Angel’s Task: Poems in Biblical Time (Station Hill Press, 2011). Dr. Patton has selected three entries from her House Crossing (AmazonUs/INDPB, 2018) for inclusion in this issue focusing on interreligious studies and the arts. Dr. Patton and Dr. Mosher were participants in a roundtable session on Interreligious Aesthetics: From Dialogue to the Senses at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion. During her term as president of the AAR, Dr. Patton appointed Dr. Mosher to the Religion and the Arts Book Award jury, which she now chairs.
  • Being Experienced By and Experiencing the Divine: An Interplay of Womanist and Shakta Traditions

    Banerjee, Preeta (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    This paper offers an introduction to the intersection of Womanist and Shakta traditions by exploring the relationship between “us experiencing the Divine” and “the Divine experiencing us.” Having noted that Alice Walker defined the term Womanism in her book In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens: Womanist Prose (1983), this paper compares Walker’s poem “There is a Flower at the Tip of My Nose Smelling Me” to the Bangla Shama Sangeet (or Ma Kali devotional song) “Mayer Payer Jaba Hoye” by Ramprasad Sen (a Shakta poet of Bengal). It suggests that grappling these pieces can lead to a mystical experience that opens us up to the ability of our sense organs beyond seeing, hearing, tasting, smelling, and touching the Divine. This experience moves us beyond dualistic perspectives and false dichotomies to multiple ways of being. From this interplay, we come to grasp the Divine as the Dark Mother in all her forms.
  • Queer Religiosities: An Introduction to Queer and Transgender Studies in Religion: By Melissa M. Wilcox

    Heath, Rachel (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    Review: Queer Religiosities: An Introduction to Queer and Transgender Studies in Religion. By Melissa M. Wilcox. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2020. xv+239pp. $100.00 (hardcover); $36.00 (paperback); $34.00 (eBook). ISBN: 978-1-4422-7566-9.
  • “One Sees Oneself in the Eye of Another”: The Creative Processes Behind a Musical Composition on Interreligious Themes

    Barbato, Melanie; Gerung, Hans-Jürgen (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    Increasingly, art is recognized as a way to promote interreligious understanding. Gegenüber (German for “vis-à-vis”) is a work for two cellos and reciter that draws on themes of three different religious traditions. The project Gegenüber aimed to contribute to the growing genre of interreligious art. In this article, the composer and the lyricist (who is also an academic working on interreligious relations) reflect together on the creative process behind this work and more generally on the challenge of working creatively with religious elements belonging to more than one religion. The authors give insight into the collaborative process and their approach to the religious narratives as an example for how interreligious art and interreligious studies or comparative theology can intersect.
  • A Śākta Method for Comparative Theology: Upside Down, Inside Out: By Pravina Rodrigues

    Banerjee, Preeta (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    Review: A Śākta Method for Comparative Theology: Upside Down, Inside Out. By Pravina Rodrigues. Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books, 2024. vii+145pp. $95.00 (hardcover). ISBN: 1666905054. 
  • Sounds of the End: Music and Eschatology in Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time and the Tibetan Practice of gCod

    Cattoi, Thomas (Boston University School of Theology | Hebrew College | Hartford International University for Religion and Peace, 2024-03-23)
    The purpose of this paper is to bring into conversation the musical vision of the French composer Olivier Messiaen (1908–92) and the role played by music in the Tibetan practice of gCod (spelled phonetically as chöd), a traditional tantric ritual aimed at the suppression of negative influences and the recovery of primal awareness. The comparison illumines the distinctive claims that the two traditions make on eschatology and individual redemption, while also exploring the role that music can play in the broader context of comparative theology. Messiaen and gcod practitioners draw inspiration from other forms of sacred music and ritual performance, but ultimately create an idiosyncratic musical genre that disrupts conventional boundaries between eternity/ultimate reality, on one hand, and temporality/ ordinary reality, on the other. A conversation between these two musical visions discloses a variety of surprising points of contact between their claims as to individual transformation and the role of transcendence, but also a number of irreducible differences concerning their distinctive soteriological and cosmological visions.
  • Manifestation Tolerance at Hok Tik Bio Pati Temple in Interfaith Social Relations

    Erin Yestia Nilam; Moh. Solehatul Mustofa; Agustinus Sugeng Priyanto (Universitas Negeri Semarang, 2023-06-01)
    Social relations between religious communities are generally not easy because of differences in backgrounds. Inter-religious ties are prone to conflict. Communities in the Pati district can interact despite differences in ethnicity and religion. Inter-community interaction can be seen through activities at the Hok Tik Bio temple, Pati Regency. The Hok Tik Bio temple is active in social-based religious activities for inter-religious people. This study used qualitative research methods. This research focuses on the manifestation of tolerance at the Hok Tik Bio temple in Pati Regency in interfaith social relations. The study shows that religious toleration images are realized through religious celebrations at the temple or non-religious celebrations for the temple's people, such as natural disaster assistance, distribution of takjil in the month of Ramadan, free vaccines, and others. The Pati district community accepted the activities held at the Hok Tik Bio temple by attending in an orderly manner and helping each other. The community was very enthusiastic because the action was suitable for teaching tolerance. The government also contributes by permitting activities and attendance.
  • s.v. «Luís Vaz de Camões»

    Nicola Melis, et al.; David Thomas, John A. Chesworth; Melis, Nicola; Melis, Nicola (E.J. Brillcountry:NLDplace:Leiden, 2014)
    Luís Vaz de Camões is considered the greatest poet of the Lusophone countries because of the influence he had on the Portuguese language. His biography is richer in anecdotes than facts, and even the details of his birth are uncertain.Description
 Os Lusíadas is an epic work, generally ranked among the masterpieces of world literature. Its title comes from Lusíadas, ‘Portuguese’, deriving from the Roman name for Portugal, Lusitania. It describes the explorations of the Portuguese and the voyage of Vasco da Gama on his discovery of the route to India, and it is also an account of the intense battle of Catholic Christendom against the advance of Islam, especially in its Sunnī form.

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