• A biblical evaluation of Healing begins with sanctification of the heart by M.K. Strydom (2013)

      Esmari Potgieter (AOSIS, 2020-03-01)
      Dr Michelle Strydom is a South African trained medical doctor whose conferences and writings have gained her and her ministry, known as ‘Eagles’ Wings’, a large following in South Africa and beyond. Her aim is to open up for her followers ‘the Bible from a medical perspective’ and ‘medicine from a Biblical perspective’. Her views are comprehensively laid out in a book of 751 pages, titled Healing begins with the sanctification of the heart. In this article, the theological premises of Healing begins with the sanctification of the heart are evaluated from a Reformed biblical perspective. Three theological ‘leaps’ in Strydom’s interpretation of the Bible are discussed and three examples are given which illustrate her a-contextual reading of the Bible. The conclusion is that, although Strydom’s book contains some valuable insights, her theological framework is largely unbiblical and contrary to the gospel. The purpose of this article is to caution Christian readers against false guarantees of healing such as these offered by Strydom and Eagles’ Wings Ministries.
    • A biblical evaluation of Healing begins with sanctification of the heart by M.K. Strydom (2013)

      Potgiceter,Esmari (Reformed Theological Society, 2020-01-01)
      Dr Michelle Strydom is a South African trained medical doctor whose conferences and writings have gained her and her ministry, known as 'Eagles' Wings', a large following in South Africa and beyond. Her aim is to open up for her followers 'the Bible from a medical perspective' and 'medicine from a Biblical perspective'. Her views are comprehensively laid out in a book of 751 pages, titled Healing begins with the sanctification of the heart. In this article, the theological premises of Healing begins with the sanctification of the heart are evaluated from a Reformed biblical perspective. Three theological 'leaps' in Strydom's interpretation of the Bible are discussed and three examples are given which illustrate her a-contextual reading of the Bible. The conclusion is that, although Strydom's book contains some valuable insights, her theological framework is largely unbiblical and contrary to the gospel. The purpose of this article is to caution Christian readers against false guarantees of healing such as these offered by Strydom and Eagles' Wings Ministries.
    • A biblically based education course to enhance self-esteem

      Cutler, Otis (Digital Showcase, 2015-01-01)
      This project seeks to observe if distinct Christian discipleship teachings can enhance the self-esteem of adult African-Americans. There is a plethora of information available on the subject of self-esteem. However, the majority of these recommendations do not recognize the role that faith and a belief in God can play in assisting with improving a people's self-esteem. Thus, this study answered two questions: 1. Will exposure to a Christian education course that emphasizes a person's relationship to God impact their self-esteem? 2. Will exposure to a Christian education course that emphasizes a personal relationship with God enhance their spiritual growth?
    • A brief history of Methodism : and of Methodist missions in South Africa, with an appendix on the Livingstonian mission

      Holden, W. Clifford (William Clifford), 1814?-1897 (London : Wesleyan conference office, 1877.Princeton Theological Seminary Library, 1877)
    • A brief history of Methodism, and of Methodist missions in South Africa / by W. Clifford Holden.

      Holden, William Clifford. (London : Wesleyan-Methodist Book-Room,, 1887)
      iv, 640 p., [12] leaves of plates (2 fold.) :
    • A Call to Excellence: Leadership Training and Mentoring Manual for Women in Ministry in the Twenty-First Century

      Mazak, Verna (DigitalCommons@Liberty University, 2016-08-01)
      The growth of women in leadership within the local church is at an all-time high. These women face tremendous obstacles as they seek to lead the twenty-first century church. This thesis investigates the role of African American women in the Black Baptist church to identify skills necessary for successful leadership within the denomination. Going beyond analysis and exploration, it answers the question of how to develop a training and mentorship program specifically designed to prepare African-American women for excellence in leadership. A survey of fifty church staff and members of various Black Baptist churches was conducted to determine the perspective and experiences of women in leadership. Interviews with three women serving as pastors within the Black Baptist church facilitated in the gathering of key data. This information was used to format a training and mentoring manual that effectively prepare African American women for leadership in the Black Baptist church.
    • A campus family

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-04-25
      A campus family and photography dark room. Written on recto: (top image) A campus family. Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Stovall, sons and daughter. (lower image): Photographic dark room. Installed in the dormitory as a training and recreational projects for students.
    • A case for organic indigenous Christianity: African Ethiopia as derivate from Jewish Christianity

      Rukuni,Rugare; Oliver,Erna (Reformed Theological College of the Netherdutch Reformed Church of Africa at the Faculty of Theology of the University of Pretoria and Society for Practical Theology in South Africa, 2019-01-01)
      From its inception to the 4th century CE, Christianity experienced a formative process composite of three catalytic phases characterised by distinctive events (i.e. Jewish-Christian Schism, Hellenism and imperial intervention). From the aforementioned era emerged an orthodoxy fostered by an imperial-ecclesiastical link. There appears to have been a parallel story with regard to certain elements of African Christianity, in particular, Ethiopian Christianity. What can be made of the gap regarding Jewish Christianity combined with the absence of African Christianity from Bauer's modular theory on heresy and orthodoxy in the development of early Christianity? Despite the dominant story of the development of an imperial religious establishment at the turn of the 4th century, could there be an alternative narrative to Christianity in the African region derivate from Ethiopia? Reviewing the emergence of a religious political Christianity in this era as modular against Ethiopian Christianity in tangent with its links with Christianity in Roman Africa, establishment of the nature and development of Ethiopian Christianity was performed. This was performed through documentary analysis. Bauer's (1971) theory of orthodoxy and heresy in early Christianity did not exhaustively account for Jewish Christianity and North African distinct intransigent tradition characteristic of Carthage. By extension to African Egyptian, Alexandria is Ethiopian Christianity that was characterised by Judaic tradition in contrast to anti-Judaism. This established a parallel history of Christianity in Africa inclusive of Ethiopia. A review of this perspective contains contemporary momentum in view of the focus on Ethiopian Jews, for example, as religious praxis was as important as ethnicity in determining the Jewishness of whole tribes.
    • A case for organic indigenous Christianity: African Ethiopia as derivate from Jewish Christianity

      Rugare Rukuni; Erna Oliver (AOSIS, 2019-05-01)
      From its inception to the 4th century CE, Christianity experienced a formative process composite of three catalytic phases characterised by distinctive events (i.e. Jewish-Christian Schism, Hellenism and imperial intervention). From the aforementioned era emerged an orthodoxy fostered by an imperial-ecclesiastical link. There appears to have been a parallel story with regard to certain elements of African Christianity, in particular, Ethiopian Christianity. What can be made of the gap regarding Jewish Christianity combined with the absence of African Christianity from Bauer’s modular theory on heresy and orthodoxy in the development of early Christianity? Despite the dominant story of the development of an imperial religious establishment at the turn of the 4th century, could there be an alternative narrative to Christianity in the African region derivate from Ethiopia? Reviewing the emergence of a religious political Christianity in this era as modular against Ethiopian Christianity in tangent with its links with Christianity in Roman Africa, establishment of the nature and development of Ethiopian Christianity was performed. This was performed through documentary analysis. Bauer’s (1971) theory of orthodoxy and heresy in early Christianity did not exhaustively account for Jewish Christianity and North African distinct intransigent tradition characteristic of Carthage. By extension to African Egyptian, Alexandria is Ethiopian Christianity that was characterised by Judaic tradition in contrast to anti-Judaism. This established a parallel history of Christianity in Africa inclusive of Ethiopia. A review of this perspective contains contemporary momentum in view of the focus on Ethiopian Jews, for example, as religious praxis was as important as ethnicity in determining the Jewishness of whole tribes.
    • A case study of former students of Ivy Leaf: An independent African-American school

      Bolger, Charles (ScholarlyCommons, 1992-01-01)
      This research examines and describes the school history of ten former Ivy Leaf students from the time they enter nursery or K-5, to their graduation from Ivy Leaf's middle school. In depth information is provided on the students' experiences at Ivy Leaf. More general information is included about those students who didn't start their school lives at Ivy Leaf as well as information about the high school that each student entered after graduation from Ivy Leaf. A central question in this study is, does Ivy Leaf address the academic and social needs of its Africoid student body? The method used was to conduct a case study as a participant observer. Data collected during the year-long study included site documents, interviews with school administrators, interviews of ten former students, their parents, and their siblings if the siblings attended Ivy Leaf. Results of this study indicate that Ivy Leaf addresses specific needs of African Americans that are evidenced by the academic and social success of many of its students. The study also indicates that Ivy Leaf serves as an integral part of secondary public and private schools by qualifying 35% of its graduates for top ranked schools in the Philadelphia area. Some of the key characteristics of the Ivy Leaf School are difficult to replicate in different environments. However, environments such as the one created by Ivy Leaf should be encouraged and recognized for the unique service which it provides to the African American community in Philadelphia. Without schools like Ivy Leaf, many of these children would be lost to the streets. Instead, many of the students are self motivated, have high career goals, and are involved in positive activities. Ivy Leaf is therefore a valuable partner in the effort to improve the educational outlook for Americans of African decent.
    • A catechism, of Scripture doctrine and practice, : for families and Sabbath schools : designed also for the oral instruction of colored persons. /

      Jones, Charles Colcock, 1804-1863.; Purse, Thomas, bookseller.; Jones, Charles Colcock, 1804-1863, copyright holder.; Cooper, John M., publisher.; Perkins & Purves, publisher.; Leavitt, Trow & Co., publisher. (Savannah : John M. Cooper. ; New-York:-- : Leavitt, Trow & Co. ; Philadelphia:-- : Perkins & Purves.,, [not befor)
      "For sale by Thomas Purse, Savannah, Ga., and Leavitt, Trow & Co., New-York: The religious instruction of the Negroes in the United States. By Charles C. Jones."--advertisement, lower cover.
    • “A Catholic-Pentecostal Perspective on the Eucharist: The Eucharist as Offering of Firstfruits and the Zebach Tôdâ”

      Ligocki, Lawrence (Digital Showcase, 2016-01-01)
      This paper will investigate the Epistle to the Hebrews and its relationship to both the Eucharist, and the offering of firstfruits. One of the main problems for some Pentecostals and even some Catholics is how to reconcile the repeated emphasis in the Epistle to the Hebrews that Jesus offered himself "once" (7:27: 9:12, 26, 28; 10:10) with the notion that the Eucharist is an offering. In contrast to scholars such as Ronald Williamson, who claim there is no connection between Hebrews and the Eucharist, I want to suggest that there is a relationship between the Eucharist and Hebrews. In Hebrews, there is evidence that the author explains Jesus as the firstfruits of the new humanity, who has ascended on high and who holds the priesthood permanently through whom the church offers the Zebach tôdâ (זֶבַח־תּוֹדָה ), the offering of praise and prayer of thanksgiving, which finds its enduring significance through charity. This paper is divided into three parts: 1) the offering of Christ; 2) the offering of the community; and 3) the offering of the Zebach Tôdâ. The first will establish the one-time sacrifice of Christ; the second and third will support the argument that the Eucharist is the offering of firstfruits. The paper begins with a short discussion on Hebrews and the Eucharist, then proceeds through the body of material, during which I will discuss Hebrews within the context of literature from Second Temple Judaism and early Christianity.
    • A Century of Catholic Mission: Roman Catholic Missiology 1910 to the Present

      Bevans, Stephen (Digital Showcase, 2013-01-01)
      A Century of Catholic Mission surveys the complex and rich history and theology of Roman Catholic Mission in the one hundred years since the 1910 Edinburgh World Mission Conference. Essays written by an international team of Catholic mission scholars focus on Catholic Mission in every region of the world, summarize church teaching on mission before and after the watershed event of the Second Vatican Council, and reflect on a wide variety of theological issues.
    • A Church as Kalafong: Ecclesiology According to Gabriel Molehe Setiloane

      Masoga, Mogomme Alpheus; School of Human and Social Sciences University of Venda (University of South Africa Press, 2017-07-13)
      The interest of this article focuses on Gabriel Molehe Setiloane’s views about the ecclesiological make-up in the context of African theology. This focus is relevant as it has been argued that Setiloane pushed for the importance of African theological discourse (Masoga 2012a). Some of the sensitive but also critical expressions by Setiloane include statements such as Motho ke Modimo, which is translated into English as “a human being is God/Divine”. It has been Setiloane’s theological interest to develop what he called the “African Divinity discourse”, encompassing areas of life such as: ethics and morality in secular contexts; family life; civil authority; “riches and poverties”; the land question; crime; leadership styles; the functioning of the corporate sector in terms of ubuntu; and bio-centric ethics. This article aims to introduce Setiloane’s voice on the idea of the church. For this purpose, it was decided that the two terms, “church” and “ecclesiology” would be used to drive the theoretical framework and practice perspectives, both of which will become clearer in the primary data used in this article. For Setiloane, his calling as a pastor, and the church in which he was called to, had much to do with kalafo (African healing) and bongaka (a Motswana initiated healer). In this case, congregants were balwetsi (patients) looking to the ngaka (traditional healer) of their malwetsi (diseases). I had the privilege to have been entrusted with unpublished articles by the late Setiloane before he passed away, as well as the honour of holding formal and informal interviews with him. This research article made use of the Thematic Content Analysis (TCA) approach to broach the recorded data in the form of formal interviews, informal discussions, stories, and statements.
    • A church as Kalafong: ecclesiology according to Gabriel Molehe Setiloane

      Masoga,Mogomme Alpheus (The Church History Society of Southern Africa, 2017-01-01)
      The interest of this article focuses on Gabriel Molehe Setiloane's views about the ecclesiological make-up in the context of African theology. This focus is relevant as it has been argued that Setiloane pushed for the importance of African theological discourse (Masoga 2012a). Some of the sensitive but also critical expressions by Setiloane include statements such as Motho ke Modimo, which is translated into English as "a human being is God/Divine". It has been Setiloane's theological interest to develop what he called the "African Divinity discourse", encompassing areas of life such as: ethics and morality in secular contexts; family life; civil authority; "riches and poverties"; the land question; crime; leadership styles; the functioning of the corporate sector in terms of ubuntu; and bio-centric ethics. This article aims to introduce Setiloane's voice on the idea of the church. For this purpose, it was decided that the two terms, "church" and "ecclesiology" would be used to drive the theoretical framework and practice perspectives, both of which will become clearer in the primary data used in this article. For Setiloane, his calling as a pastor, and the church in which he was called to, had much to do with kalafo (African healing) and bongaka (Setswana for traditional-indigenous healing system). In this case, congregants were balwetsi (patients) looking to the ngaka (traditional healer) of their malwetsi (diseases). I had the privilege to have been entrusted with unpublished articles by the late Setiloane before he passed away, as well as the honour of holding formal and informal interviews with him. This research article made use of the Thematic Content Analysis (TCA) approach to broach the recorded data in the form of formal interviews, informal discussions, stories, and statements.
    • A Church History of the First Three Centuries: From the Thirtieth to the Three Hundred and ...

      New York Public Library; Milo Mahan (D. Dana, 1860-01-01)
      Book digitized by Google from the library of the New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.
    • A Class on the Steps of Gammon

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-09-01
      A group of students and faculty gather for a potrait on the steps of a building on the Gammon campus.