• C. C. Branson

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      Portrait of Mr. C. C. Branson.
    • C. C. Branson

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      C. C. Branson seated at his desk.
    • C. C. Branson

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      C. C. Branson seated at his desk.
    • C.A. McGill

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      Portrait of C.A. McGill. Written on verso: With love from C.A. McGill Monrovia, Liberia, March 23rd, 1918
    • Cafeteria

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-04-25
      Unidentified staff serve food to those waiting in ITC cafeteria line.
    • Cafeteria

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-04-25
      Unidentified man takes food tray served by unidentified dining hall staff as other unidentified men stand behind him in line. Written on verso: ITC Dining Hall, Spring 1964.
    • Cafeteria

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-04-25
      Students eat inside ITC Dining hall. Written on verso: ITC Dining Hall, Spring 1963.
    • Cafeteria

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-04-25
      Unidentified man carries food tray in ITC cafeteria line with unidentified others behind.
    • “Callings, Giftings, and Empowerment: Preaching Women and American Pentecostalism in Historical and Theological Perspective”

      Tackett, Zachary (Digital Showcase, 2016-01-01)
      Pentecostal women serve in various ecclesial roles, including roles of authority. Historically Pentecostals have contended that all may be called, gifted, and empowered to proclaim the gospel. This advocacy follows the tradition of Evangelicals and Holiness advocates of the nineteenth century. The foundation for this gospel is the eschatological Pentecost Proclamation. The implication of the eschatological proclamation for praxis is a radical, egalitarian gospel. Yet, Pentecostals have struggled with the limits of such an expression. This quandary is addressed in this chapter in two parts. The first part provides an historical analysis of the development of American Pentecostals’ praxis relating to the personhood and roles of women, with particular emphasis upon women as proclaimers of gospel. The second part engages interpretive grids for understanding the theological dynamics that are reflected in the historical developments. The first grid is that of institutionalization. The second is radicalization followed by embourgeoisement. The third consideration is the nature of the Pentecostals’ eschatology as it relates to egalitarianism.
    • Calvary A.M.E. (Orangeburg, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historial Records Survey (1938-02-28)
    • Calvary Baptist (N. Paxville, S.C.)

      Boykin, Lulie H.; South Carolina Historical Records Survey (1937-10-30)
    • Calvin C. Lawton

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      Calvin C. Lawton seated with class discussing homiletics.
    • Calvin, France, South Africa : papers read at the Third South African Congress on Calvin Research, Stellenbosch, 26-29, July 1988

      Pont, Adriaan D.; South African Congress on Calvin Research (3 : 1988 : Stellenbosch) (Kital, 1990)
    • Campus families

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-04-25
      Campus family scenes. Written on recto: (top image) The Wilson family. Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Wilson, II and daughter Deborah. She was born September 15, 1956, at Gammon, a real Gammon baby. (lower image): A growing family. Mr. and Mrs. William B. Meekins, son, and daughters. Little Charline (in arms) is four weeks old.
    • Campus visitors

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-04-25
      A group of multiracial students visit the ITC campus.
    • Campus visitors

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-04-25
      A group of multiracial students visit the ITC campus. Written on Verso: (L to R) Mr. Berty Hakum (?), Mrs. Sue Hakum, Mr. Warren Moore, Mr. Simon Bowie.
    • Campus Women's Club

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      A group of women gather in around a couch in a living room. Written on verso: Members of the Campus Women's club of Gammon Theological Seminary with Mrs. Selma Richardson.
    • Can Christian ethics be used to engage business? A (South) African consideration

      willem.fourie@up.ac.za; Fourie, Willem (Faculty of Theology of the University of the Orange Free State, 2012-07-10)
      Business enterprises are in a position to exert a significant influence on society
 – particularly in the context of developing countries. Businesses no longer
 simply influence shareholders, employees and customers, but also play a role in
 strengthening (or weakening) political institutions and contributing to the wellbeing
 of other stakeholders. The result is that business enterprises are increasingly
 accountable to a growing number of stakeholders. In this article the possibility
 of utilising Christian ethics to engage business is investigated. The question is
 whether it is at all possible for the church to address the business world by applying
 its particular ethical resources, and – should this be possible – what form such
 engagements could take.
    • Can Christian ethics be used to engage business? A (South) African consideration

      willem.fourie@up.ac.za; Fourie, Willem (Faculty of Theology of the University of the Orange Free State, 2012)
      Business enterprises are in a position to exert a significant influence on society – particularly in the context of developing countries. Businesses no longer simply influence shareholders, employees and customers, but also play a role in strengthening (or weakening) political institutions and contributing to the wellbeing of other stakeholders. The result is that business enterprises are increasingly accountable to a growing number of stakeholders. In this article the possibility of utilising Christian ethics to engage business is investigated. The question is whether it is at all possible for the church to address the business world by applying its particular ethical resources, and – should this be possible – what form such engagements could take.