• D'Augustino

      Bronx African American History Project, D'Augustino. (DigitalResearch@Fordham, 2003-09-30)
      Interviewer: Mark Naison Interviews took place on September 30, 2003 Summarized by Alice Stryker This interview is broken into 3 sessions. The first two are with an anonymous woman called “woman 1” and the third session is with an anonymous woman called “woman 2”. Woman 1, who we later learn is Mrs. Jones, moved to the Bronx in 1947 to Oak Tree Place and Belmont where they were the only black family on the block. She was initially from Georgia, but moved to New York City when she was very young. Her husband was born in Harlem. They went to St. Martin of Tours for church. This church was mostly Italian and Irish, and they were the only African-American family to attend that church. Her and her husband had to walk their children to and from school, St. Martin of Tours, because the white children, who also attended that school, abused their children. Her husband owned a Laundromat on 180th between Arthur and Beaumont Avenue. After her husband died, she sold the Laundromat because people would frequently break into the Laundromat. After that, they moved to a live-in on Washington and 166th street. However they only stayed there a few years and then moved to an apartment 2 blocks north of Tremont. She had help from the community leaders, specifically Mrs. Ditz, in getting her children into college She was very active in the community and put pressure on community planning board 6 to fix things in her neighborhood. She was very effective at doing this. What inspired her to become active in the community was the racism she experienced when she was living in close proximity to the Italians and Jews in the Arthur Avenue area. One of her biggest achievements was that she was able to find contractors that would start to rebuild neighborhoods in the Bronx that were destroyed by the fires in the late 70’s. “Woman 2” came to the Bronx in the 1960’s and was in the beauty business. She worked for many beauty shops and opened her own. Her husband worked for the city, specifically with subways. She found it very easy to open a shop of her own because she had clients from her previous work. She moved into a bran new housing project but cannot recall the name of it. She opened a shop on 127th between Lenox and 5th Avenue. When she lived in Kentucky, she had a lot of white clients. However, when she moved to New York, he clients were all African-American. She was Baptist and her husband was Methodist, but 3 of their 4 children were Catholic. The reason for this was because she believed Catholic schools were better. She would take her children to mass then go, herself, to a Baptist church. She believes that she is so healthy at 90 because of her daily helping of sauerkraut juice. She learned this when she was a child from a woman who originated from the West Indies. When she was living in Harlem and the Bronx in the 60’s she heard Malcolm X speak shortly before his assassination. She also participated in a number of marches and protests.
    • D'Augustino

      Bronx African American History Project, D'Augustino. (DigitalResearch@Fordham, 2003-09-30)
      Interviewer: Mark Naison Interviews took place on September 30, 2003 Summarized by Alice Stryker This interview is broken into 3 sessions. The first two are with an anonymous woman called “woman 1” and the third session is with an anonymous woman called “woman 2”. Woman 1, who we later learn is Mrs. Jones, moved to the Bronx in 1947 to Oak Tree Place and Belmont where they were the only black family on the block. She was initially from Georgia, but moved to New York City when she was very young. Her husband was born in Harlem. They went to St. Martin of Tours for church. This church was mostly Italian and Irish, and they were the only African-American family to attend that church. Her and her husband had to walk their children to and from school, St. Martin of Tours, because the white children, who also attended that school, abused their children. Her husband owned a Laundromat on 180th between Arthur and Beaumont Avenue. After her husband died, she sold the Laundromat because people would frequently break into the Laundromat. After that, they moved to a live-in on Washington and 166th street. However they only stayed there a few years and then moved to an apartment 2 blocks north of Tremont. She had help from the community leaders, specifically Mrs. Ditz, in getting her children into college She was very active in the community and put pressure on community planning board 6 to fix things in her neighborhood. She was very effective at doing this. What inspired her to become active in the community was the racism she experienced when she was living in close proximity to the Italians and Jews in the Arthur Avenue area. One of her biggest achievements was that she was able to find contractors that would start to rebuild neighborhoods in the Bronx that were destroyed by the fires in the late 70’s. “Woman 2” came to the Bronx in the 1960’s and was in the beauty business. She worked for many beauty shops and opened her own. Her husband worked for the city, specifically with subways. She found it very easy to open a shop of her own because she had clients from her previous work. She moved into a bran new housing project but cannot recall the name of it. She opened a shop on 127th between Lenox and 5th Avenue. When she lived in Kentucky, she had a lot of white clients. However, when she moved to New York, he clients were all African-American. She was Baptist and her husband was Methodist, but 3 of their 4 children were Catholic. The reason for this was because she believed Catholic schools were better. She would take her children to mass then go, herself, to a Baptist church. She believes that she is so healthy at 90 because of her daily helping of sauerkraut juice. She learned this when she was a child from a woman who originated from the West Indies. When she was living in Harlem and the Bronx in the 60’s she heard Malcolm X speak shortly before his assassination. She also participated in a number of marches and protests.
    • Dabney's Pond Baptist Church (Richland County, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historical Records Survey (1937-11-15)
    • Dade of deugde? Implikasies vir Suid-Afrikaanse kerke van 'n modern-postmoderne debat oor die moraliteit

      Dept. of Religion and Theology; Faculty of Arts; Smit, D.J; Reinders, J.S; Koopman, Nico Norman (University of the Western Cape, 2013-08-14)
      Doctor Theologiae
    • Dance

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-04-25
      A group of students gather for a fall dance.
    • DANCE AND PENTECOSTAL WORSHIP

      Higginbotham, Jo Ann B. (Digital Showcase, 1997-01-01)
    • Daniel Francois Malan, 1874-1959 : an ecclesiological study of the influence of his theology

      Stellenbosch University. Faculty of . Dept. of .; Brink, George William (Stellenbosch : Stellenbosch University, 2012-08-27)
      One copy microfiche.
    • Daniel's book unsealed: Protestant missionaries and indigenous prophecies in nineteenth-century New Zealand and South Africa

      Wagstrom, Thor Andrew (DigitalCommons@University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 1999-01-01)
      When evangelical missionaries fanned around the globe during the nineteenth century, they brought with them messages of prophecy and of millenarian expectation. In their eagerness to evangelize the world, they spread these messages to indigenous societies but did not have the resources to control how these messages were interpreted or used by those to whom they preached. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the influence that the messages brought by evangelical missionaries had on innovative religious movements particularly among the Xhosa on the eastern frontier of the Cape Colony and among the Maori in New Zealand. ^ This thesis examines the sources of missionary messages, the transmission of those messages, and the effects that they had on indigenous people. It makes two main contributions to the study of innovative religions in the wake of European expansion. First, it looks closely at the process of communication of Christian beliefs by missionaries and at the breakdown in that process, which permitted independent interpretation. In this effort, the perspectives and behaviors of both the missionaries and the indigenous people are considered. Second, it makes comparisons throughout between two contexts: the eastern Cape frontier and New Zealand. In showing the similarities between these two cases, the argument is made that missionary influence was one of the primary reasons that the religious aspects of indigenous resistance to European colonization took such similar forms in South Africa and New Zealand. ^
    • Danlette L. Ennis

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      Portrait of Danlette L. Ennis.
    • Dans met Triniteit

      Hendriks, H. Jurgens; Venter, Leon (Stellenbosch : University of Stellenbosch, 2010-12)
      ENGLISH ABSTRACT: In 1990 H.S. Spies did research on the praxis and future of the DRC churches in Parow. He found that the membership of the DRC in Parow was declining at a very fast rate and that many congregations would not survive financially. He proposed that a new paradigm was needed for the ministry in Parow. This study makes a summary of his thesis and discusses the reaction of the leaders in Parow on his study. It asks the question why the Circuit of Parow could not in their context address the challenge of changing demographics over a period of twenty years. The Circuit of Parow took the findings of Spies very serious and planned to address the challenge of changing demographics in Parow. Their proposal founds its culmination in the idea that all the Parow congregations must become one big mega-church. It never became a reality and the situation worsened. In fact, only six of the twelve congregations that exist in 1990 are still independent and alive. The other six congregations dissolved and became part of stronger congregations between 1990 and 2002. The area of Parow has changed demographically. There are more people living in the area, but it is not traditional white, Afrikaner, DRC, people. The congregations in the circuit could not cross the borders of race, colour, language and culture to include others. This study also discusses the wider context in which the story of Parow is playing out, namely the three storms of change, globalisation, post modernism and post Christianity. The knowledge, habits and actions that the leaders employed in the past are not helpful in the changing world. The study describes two paradigm shifts that are taking place in the church that could help to develop a new ecclesiological practice in Parow. The first paradigm shift relates closely with the theological insights that developed in the past sixty years around the concept of missio Dei. The second paradigm shift that is brought forward in this study relates with the skills of spiritual leaders in managing change. The study maintain, that in light of the changes in the world and the field in which spiritual leaders operate, the only way to handle the new challenges is by the transformation of the spiritual leader‘s own pre-conceptions, knowledge, ideas and practices. The leadership ability, by which we learn to understand how God is already present in the world according to the insights of missio Dei, is faith discernment. Discernment is the process whereby Christians step into listening and doing spaces as a faith community. Spiritual leaders will have to learn discernment and how to make it an ecclesiological practice. It is in the listening and doing spaces and in growing consciousness of the presence of Trinity, where transformation of the faith community takes place. The phenomenological description by Otto Scharmer of what he calls the new leadership skill of 'presencing' helps to understand the process of faith discernment better. The study ends with three new hipotheses.
    • "Daring in Order to Know" : Studies in Bengt Sundkler's Contribution as Africanist and Missionary Scholar

      Hallencreutz, Carl Fredrik; Henningsson, Jan (Uppsala universitet, Svenska Institutet för MissionsforskningUppsala : Swedish Institute of Mission Research, 1984)
      Daring in Order to Know that was Bengt Sundkler's title of his lecture when he as Bishop of Bukoba - and Professor Upsaliensis on leave from his Alma Mater - summarized the history of the International Missionary Council on the eve of its integration with the World Council of Churches in New Delhi on 17th November 1961. As a title Daring in Order to Know is a fitting pointer also to characteristic features in Bengt Sundkler's own scholarly contribution. Courage, concerned commitment and understanding involvement in people inform his analysis. Artistic ambitions inspire the form of presentation of his results. That is why we have decided to call this Festschrift, "Daring, in Order to Know": Studies in Bengt Sundkler's Contribution as Africanist and Missionary Scholar.
    • Daughter of Matthew A.M.E. Church (Richland County, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historical Records Survey (1937-11-15)
    • Daughters of Zion Baptist Church (Richland County, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historical Records Survey (1937-11-15)
    • David Abernathy

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      Instructor David Abernathy with students. Written on verso: Protestant Radio and TV center. David Abernathy - Instructor. L to R: Mr. Bertz Hakeem, Mr. Andrew Cooper, Mr. Harry Patterson. Spring, 1963.
    • David Abernathy

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      Instructor David Abernathy with students. Written on verso: Protestant Radio and TV center. David Abernathy, Instructor; Bertz Hakeem, student.
    • David Abernathy

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      Instructor David Abernathy with students. Written on verso: Protestant Radio and TV center. Harry Patterson, Bertz Hakeem, Andrew Cooper, David Abernathy.
    • David Abernathy

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      Instructor David Abernathy with students. Written on verso: Communication methods class.