• O. A. C. Review Volume 45 Issue 1, October 1932

      Wass, N. H.; Ruhnke, Prof. G. N.; McArthur, D. C.; Garnett, W. J.; Anderson, F. K.; Twamley, B. E.; McTaggart, D. T.; Hosie, G. T.; Godfrey, W. G.; Kellough, E.; et al. (Ontario Agricultural College, 2018-07-13)
      This issue begins the new school year with an appeal to the students for them to engage with the college clubs and societies. Agricultural articles pertain to agricultural practices in South Africa and Japan, and the organization of the Agricultural Engineers Group of the C. S. T. A. The Departmental Notes column provides introductory information for each of the college departments. While the College (campus) news outlines the executive committees for the prominent campus clubs. There is an article devoted to the new Wildman Trophy for athletics. Athletic news addresses the sports activities of the month. The Alumni and Macdonald Institute columns do not appears this month, instead there is a listing of the names and addresses of the O. A. C. first year students.
    • O. A. C. Review Volume 50 Issue 2, November 1937

      Trant, Ion; Young, D. M.; Ruhnke, G. N.; Alexander, O. R.; Chase, F. E.; McGill, M. A.; Carlyle, Helen; Manahan, Peggy; Harrison, H. M.; Tolton, W.; et al. (Ontario Agricultural College, 2013-10-21)
      This issue comments on the lack of attendance at the annual book fair. Agricultural articles pertain to agriculture in South Africa and Angola, a German agriculturalist's perspective on agriculture in Ontario, and interest in the International Plowing Match held in Fergus, Ontario. A specific article highlights Jack Miner's nature conservation with his bird sanctuary in Guelph. Campus news reports on a few new campus representatives, the student initiation, various dances, and campus humour. The literary section addresses the campus debates and theatrical production of "You Never Can Tell". The English Department's bulletin explains the college motto, proper etiquette, and penny dreadful. The athletic column reports on the track meet, soccer, and rugby. The Macdonald Institute column provides an announcement on the new food laboratory, Halloween Dance, and Homecoming. Alumni news reports on faculty changes and alumni updates. This issue does not contain an Alumnae column.
    • O. A. C. Review Volume 50 Issue 6, March 1938

      Young, Murray; Galonski, A. M.; Fricke, G. R.; Ruhnke, G. N.; Trant, Ion; Phillips, R. W.; Beer, B. S.; Knight, A. T.; Carlyle, Helen; Manahan, Peggy; et al. (Ontario Agricultural College, 2013-04-17)
      This issue's editorial comments on public opinion toward the inevitability of war. The agricultural articles pertain to coffee production in Tanganyika, propagating chrysanthemums, selecting a camera for agricultural research, and Canada's wheat. The Minister of Agriculture provided an article that commends the practicality of the two-year farm course at the Ontario Agricultural College. Two articles pertain to innovations: one on "magic bullets", or cures, for viruses, and the other on engineering. This month's English column addresses punctuation. The athletic column reports on the annual athletic banquet and the teams results. Campus news highlights College Royal, the theatrical productions, and the Student's Co-operative Concert. The Macdonald institute column comments on the art of studying, the senior homemaker banquet and dance, and the debates. The centrefold provides highlights and photographs of the College Royal winners. The Ontario Veterinary College column contributes updates regarding the fraternity Omega Tau Sigma, the vet student's college yell, and the second year dance. The Alumni column reports on the alumni events, the sons of O. A. C. fathers, and alumni updates. The Alumnae columns provides marriage announcements, an alumna's letter, and alumnae updates. Completing this issue are various club reports and a C. O. T. C. update.
    • O. A. C. Review Volume 51 Issue 3, December 1938

      Young, Murray; Galonski, A. M.; Fricke, G. R.; Ruhnke, G. N.; Phillips, R. W.; Parrot, D. A.; Knight, A. T.; Christie, Florence; Rutherford, Nora; Sowden, Fred; et al. (Ontario Agricultural College, 2013-01-31)
      The agricultural articles in this issue pertain to the chemistry of soil testing in Ontario, South African agriculture, and the gas storage of pears. Students provides articles on the idea of establishing national state scholarships for students in Canada, the adventure of being employed on a cattle boat to England, and the success of the horticultural exhibit - the Winter Garden, at the Royal Winter Fair. Other articles address the meeting of the Entomological Society of Ontario, and training future judges in the Junior Farmers Clubs. The English Department column provides book reviews, an explanation of the naming of the city of Guelph, and the use of slang language. The athletics column contains the results of the competitions in boxing, wrestling, fencing, hockey, and swimming. The Literary column contains news of the drama contest across campus; inter year debates, and the reorganization of the International Relations Club. Campus news comments on the end of semester rush to complete exams, the new Sadie Hawkins Day dance, and an introduction to the new campus presidents for the various campus clubs. The Ontario Veterinary College and Trent Institute provide updates of their current activities. The Macdonald Institute column introduces the new house presidents and provides some perspectives on the Sadie Hawkins Day. The Macdonald Alumnae column contains alumnae updates and wedding announcements. The Alumni column reports on the creation of the Graduate Club, erecting a memorial plaque for William Squirrell, and provides alumni updates.
    • Oak Grove (Berkeley County, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historical Records Survey (Univeristy of South Carolina. South Caroliniana Library, 1938-04-30)
    • Oak Grove Baptist (Parler, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historial Records Survey (1937-09-10)
    • Of Empty Pockets and Empty Souls

      Africa Journal of Evangelical Theology (Scott Christian University School of Theology, 1994)
      "In Africa, where poverty and its complications are so acute, Yevtushenko's observation still rings true. There are empty pockets everywhere and this is cause for concern and action. Far more dangerous, however, are the empty souls that fill African cities, crowd African schoolrooms and drift through African churches and mosques. Africans need something to believe in. Kwame Nkrumah knew this back in the 1950s and he put himself forward as the black messiah"
    • Old Nathan's (NE Manning, S.C.)

      Boykin, Lulie H.; South Carolina Historical Records Survey (01-09-1937)
    • Olive Chapel Baptist Church (Apex, N.C.) records

      Z. Smith Reynolds Library Special Collections and Archives (2012-04-11)
    • Om saam te weet en dan te luister : Edward Schillebeeckx se begrip Deus Humanissimus as die kerk se gewete

      tanya.vanwyk@up.ac.za; Van Wyk, Tanya (OpenJournals Publishing, 2013-10-08)
      In this article the notion of the conscience of
 the church is investigated. By deconstructing the apostle Paul’s notion of conscience and then
 exploring the connection he makes between knowledge and conscience, the role of critical
 voices of theologians within the church is examined, with special reference to the life and
 theology of Edward Schillebeeckx. His notion of Deus Humanissimus – the human face of God
 that becomes visible in Jesus Christ – is explored as the conscience of the church, with special
 reference to the inclusivity of the church. The Netherdutch Reformed Church of Africa (NRCA)
 is then described as an example of a church where knowledge and conscience presently do not
 correlate, resulting in the persistence of the NRCA’s self-description as an ethnic ‘people’s’
 church, as it struggles on its journey to inclusivity. It is suggested that Schillebeeckx’s notion
 of Deus Humanissimus as the conscience of the NRCA can help this church to write a new
 narrative.
    • Om saam te weet en dan te luister : Edward Schillebeeckx se begrip Deus Humanissimus as die kerk se gewete

      tanya.vanwyk@up.ac.za; Van Wyk, Tanya (OpenJournals Publishing, 2013-10-08)
      http://www.hts.org.za
    • On a bumpy road : historical survey of (unity) talks between the Dutch Reformed Church in Africa and the Dutch Reformed Church before 1994

      Kgatla, S.T. (Selaelo Thias) (Church History Society of Southern Africa, 2012-05-29)
      The events prior to and after church unity between the former Dutch Reformed Church in
 Africa (DRCA) and the Dutch Reformed Mission Church (DRMC) in 1994 are
 perplexing because the white Dutch Reformed Church (NG Kerk) was influenced by
 apartheid ideology in its response to church unity within the DRC family.1 Unsuccessful
 unity talks were previously held with the white Dutch Reformed Church (NG Kerk) and
 the Reformed Church of Africa (RCA), but minutes of these talks reveal that a biblical
 concept of church unity was problematic, especially to the NG Kerk, which created a
 language that made the issue of Christian unity elusive. This article gives a brief survey
 of the developments that shaped the unity process with the DRMC and the DRCA from
 1986 until 1994, when the two churches eventually united. The role played by the white
 DRC and its motive to frustrate the unity process is analysed. The change of the
 leadership of the DRCA in 1987, the DRCA General Synod in Umtata and the
 momentum this change gave to the process of church unity between the DRCM and the
 DRCA are investigated. The internal struggles within the DRCA’s Northern Transvaal
 Synod2 are also discussed. The gender inclusivity in the ministry of the church, property
 ownership and the inclusion of both in the new Church Order are investigated. After
 seventeen years of democracy in South Africa, church unity among the Dutch Reformed
 family of churches (the RCA, NG Kerk and URCSA) has not yet been realised. This
 article sketches the DRCA’s road to unity with the DRMC in 1994 without the NG Kerk
 and RCA, reading church history backwards to shed light on why it was so difficult for
 the NG Kerk and RCA to unite with the URCSA.
    • On a bumpy road : historical survey of (unity) talks between the Dutch Reformed Church in Africa and the Dutch Reformed Church before 1994

      Kgatla, Thias (Church History Society of Southern Africa, 2012-05-29)
      The events prior to and after church unity between the former Dutch Reformed Church in Africa (DRCA) and the Dutch Reformed Mission Church (DRMC) in 1994 are perplexing because the white Dutch Reformed Church (NG Kerk) was influenced by apartheid ideology in its response to church unity within the DRC family.1 Unsuccessful unity talks were previously held with the white Dutch Reformed Church (NG Kerk) and the Reformed Church of Africa (RCA), but minutes of these talks reveal that a biblical concept of church unity was problematic, especially to the NG Kerk, which created a language that made the issue of Christian unity elusive. This article gives a brief survey of the developments that shaped the unity process with the DRMC and the DRCA from 1986 until 1994, when the two churches eventually united. The role played by the white DRC and its motive to frustrate the unity process is analysed. The change of the leadership of the DRCA in 1987, the DRCA General Synod in Umtata and the momentum this change gave to the process of church unity between the DRCM and the DRCA are investigated. The internal struggles within the DRCA’s Northern Transvaal Synod2 are also discussed. The gender inclusivity in the ministry of the church, property ownership and the inclusion of both in the new Church Order are investigated. After seventeen years of democracy in South Africa, church unity among the Dutch Reformed family of churches (the RCA, NG Kerk and URCSA) has not yet been realised. This article sketches the DRCA’s road to unity with the DRMC in 1994 without the NG Kerk and RCA, reading church history backwards to shed light on why it was so difficult for the NG Kerk and RCA to unite with the URCSA.
    • On a long neglected player: The religious dimension in poverty alleviation. The example of the so-called ‘Prosperity Gospel’ in Africa

      Schliesser, Christine (Brill Academic Publishers, 2014)
      Much of poverty alleviation theory and practice fails to sufficiently consider the following crucial factor: the religious dimension. This paper elaborates this thesis by focusing on the African context and the valuable resources African religious communities and movements can provide in the struggle against poverty. One particularly influential streak of present-time African religiousness serves as a case study: the so-called ‘Prosperity Gospel’ as part of Pentecostal Christianity. The author first argues for the continuing formative influence of religion on African conceptions of self, other, and world. Secondly, she provides a critical assessment of the impact of Pentecostalism and the ‘Prosperity Gospel’ on poverty alleviation. In comparison with secular ngos, Pentecostal churches emerge as the more effective agents of change. A third part situates the insights gained into a wider perspective, seeking ways to integrate the religious factor into a more holistic conception of and engagement against poverty.
    • On a Long Neglected Player: The Religious Factor in Poverty Alleviation

      Schliesser, Christine (2014)
      Much of poverty alleviation theory and practice fails to sufficiently consider the following crucial factor: the religious dimension. This paper elaborates this thesis by focusing on the African context and the valuable resources African religious communities and movements can provide in the struggle against poverty. One particularly influential streak of present-time African religiousness serves as a case study: the so-called ‘Prosperity Gospel’ as part of Pentecostal Christianity. The author first argues for the continuing formative influence of religion on African conceptions of self, other, and world. Secondly, she provides a critical assessment of the impact of Pentecostalism and the ‘Prosperity Gospel’ on poverty alleviation. In comparison with secular ngos, Pentecostal churches emerge as the more effective agents of change. A third part situates the insights gained into a wider perspective, seeking ways to integrate the religious factor into a more holistic conception of and engagement against poverty
    • On the Value of Action and Participatory Research for Intercultural Theology: Reflections in the Light of a Research Project on “Science and Religion in French-Speaking Africa”

      Bom, Klaas L.; van den Toren, Benno (2018)
      This article explores the importance of “action research” and “participatory research” (ar and pr) for intercultural theology. After introducing these research strategies, it provides a theological rationale for their use in intercultural theology: (1) they move beyond false dichotomies between theoretical and practical theology; (2) they understand professional theologians as part of communities of believers; and (3) they allow for intercultural encounters which approach “the other” as partners in research rather than merely objects of research. Using the example of a research project which studies attitudes to the interface between science and Christian faith among African university students and academics, the article considers three crucial issues for the value and use of ar and pr in intercultural theology: (1) the intrinsic motivation of the partners for intercultural research projects, (2) the role of shared visions of change and (3) the question of truth implied in visions of human flourishing.1