• Sabbath School Class

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-09-01
      School portrait of children with their teacher. Written on recto: Sabbath School Class, class no. 8, Stewart A. M. E. church, G. Moughon - teacher.
    • Sacred and secular currents for theological education in Africa

      Okesson, Gregg A. (Scott Christian University School of Theology, 2007)
      "In 1965 Harvey Cox wrote Secular City, which chronicled the increasing secularisation of society and the need for talking about God in distinctly nonspiritual ways. Over the years, Cox slowly began to change his views on this subject, culminating in one of his most recent books, Fire from Heaven, where he explores the rise of global forms of Pentecostalism. In the Introduction to this book he says, 'We are definitely in a period of renewed religious vitality, another "great awakening" if you will, with all the promise and peril religious revivals always bring with them, but this time on a world scale' . 1 This 'turn about' in Cox's writings is representative of many contemporary religious thinkers, especially in light of the rise of new religious movements (often linked formally or informally with Pentecostalism). Hence, the secularisation thesis, vigorously argued and defended over the past thirty years, is being contested and reshaped by resurgent forms of global religiosity. "
    • Sacred gospel and the Soka Gakkai: Correlating Black liberation theology and Buddhist humanism---Implications for religious education and the alleviation of African American ethnic suffering

      Muwwakkil, Zakiya N (DigitalResearch@Fordham, 2010-01-01)
      This study explores black liberation theology and the Buddhist practice of the Soka Gakkai International. It analyzes how these two divergent religious traditions have appealed to African Americans seeking spiritual, personal and social liberation from suffering. Recognizing the co-extensive balance of both spiritual and humanistic approaches to faith, this study correlates these two traditions in order to present principles that are essential to any religious educational model seeking to aid in the alleviation of African American ethnic suffering. There are two questions guiding this study. First, how have the faith practices of black theology and the Buddhist practice of the Soka Gakkai International (SGI) addressed the issues of suffering? Second, how can the unique explicit language found in black theology, be reconciled with the self-liberating principles of the SGI? This study presents these questions as they offer guiding principles in addressing the issue of African American ethnic suffering. In order to tie these traditions together, as well as highlight both their humanistic features, this study employed the humanistic frameworks of William R. Jones and Anthony B. Pinn. Their works provided both a conduit between black theology and SGI Buddhist practice as well as a critical lens in which to address the issue of ethnic suffering in a religious education setting. Two primary methodologies are utilized to conduct this research. A historical approach is employed in order to survey the foundation of African American ethnic suffering of and the theological approaches that were subsequently developed to address this issue, as well as to present the establishment of the Soka Gakkai International and its ideology of suffering. This study is also grounded in a humanistic research approach which focuses on the need for positive scholarly, spiritual, and psychological change within the African American community. In correlating black theology with SGI Buddhist practice, this study holds that there are four essential principles which should inform any religious educational model seeking to alleviate African American ethnic suffering. These principles are: recognizing ethnic suffering as specific, the utilization of explicit language as a method to alleviate ethnic suffering, defining the secular and spiritual as correlative in the cessation of suffering, and education on racism.
    • Sacred gospel and the Soka Gakkai: Correlating Black liberation theology and Buddhist humanism—Implications for religious education and the alleviation of African American ethnic suffering

      Muwwakkil, Zakiya N (DigitalResearch@Fordham, 2010-01-01)
      This study explores black liberation theology and the Buddhist practice of the Soka Gakkai International. It analyzes how these two divergent religious traditions have appealed to African Americans seeking spiritual, personal and social liberation from suffering. Recognizing the co-extensive balance of both spiritual and humanistic approaches to faith, this study correlates these two traditions in order to present principles that are essential to any religious educational model seeking to aid in the alleviation of African American ethnic suffering. There are two questions guiding this study. First, how have the faith practices of black theology and the Buddhist practice of the Soka Gakkai International (SGI) addressed the issues of suffering? Second, how can the unique explicit language found in black theology, be reconciled with the self-liberating principles of the SGI? This study presents these questions as they offer guiding principles in addressing the issue of African American ethnic suffering. In order to tie these traditions together, as well as highlight both their humanistic features, this study employed the humanistic frameworks of William R. Jones and Anthony B. Pinn. Their works provided both a conduit between black theology and SGI Buddhist practice as well as a critical lens in which to address the issue of ethnic suffering in a religious education setting. Two primary methodologies are utilized to conduct this research. A historical approach is employed in order to survey the foundation of African American ethnic suffering of and the theological approaches that were subsequently developed to address this issue, as well as to present the establishment of the Soka Gakkai International and its ideology of suffering. This study is also grounded in a humanistic research approach which focuses on the need for positive scholarly, spiritual, and psychological change within the African American community. In correlating black theology with SGI Buddhist practice, this study holds that there are four essential principles which should inform any religious educational model seeking to alleviate African American ethnic suffering. These principles are: recognizing ethnic suffering as specific, the utilization of explicit language as a method to alleviate ethnic suffering, defining the secular and spiritual as correlative in the cessation of suffering, and education on racism.
    • Sacred mission, worldly ambition : Black Christian nationalism in the age of Jim Crow

      Oltman, Adele (1957-) (Univ. of Georgia Press, 2008)
      Mapping Black Savannah : nation and religion -- Holding the line for the Word : Black Evangelicals below the Mason-Dixon -- "Even if He is a woman" : Savannah's talented tenth and Black suffrage -- "Have hardly had straw" : Black Christian nation building and white Christian philanthropy -- "Peace and harmony of the church" : the secularization of Black Savannah -- Epilogue: From Black Christian nationalism to Civil Rights
    • Sacred Music, Sacred Journeys : What Makes an Event Postcolonial?

      Salzbrunn Monika; von Weichs Raphaela (2013)
      Fanon, Senghor, and Ela took a radical stance in criticising the structures and mechanisms of power in hegemonic situations and relations between colonial subjects and colonial masters. They aimed to liberate African societies by decolonising the mind, culture and religion of colonial subjects. In this respect, we are concerned with the continuities and ruptures of the colonial encounter and its unequal relationships. Switzerland does not have an official colonial history and yet, Swiss companies and migrants were and are part of the world's colonies. In our contribution, we question what makes an event postcolonial : in other words, how are postcolonial relations negotiated in Switzerland? We discuss this question by analysing two annual sacred journeys in Switzerland that have been invented for and by African Christians (clerics and laity) together with the leaders of the Swiss Catholic church : one to the relics of African saints in St. Maurice, canton Valais and the other to the Black Madonna, the Virgin Mary of Einsiedeln, in the canton Schwyz. These events are empowered by the performance of African choirs - their music, dance, and costumes - but to which end and in which way?
    • Sacred violence : African Christians and sectarian hatred in the age of Augustine

      Shaw, Brent D. (1947-) (Cambridge University Press, 2011)
    • Sacred violence : African Christians and sectarian hatred in the age of Augustine

      Shaw, Brent D. (1947-)
      One route to understanding the nature of specifically religious violence is the study of past conflicts. Distinguished ancient historian Brent D. Shaw provides a new analysis of the intense sectarian battles between the Catholic and Donatist churches of North Africa in late antiquity, in which Augustine played a central role as Bishop of Hippo. The development and deployment of images of hatred, including that of the heretic, the pagan, and the Jew, and the modes by which these were most effectively employed, including the oral world of the sermon, were critical to promoting acts of violence. Shaw explores how the emerging ecclesiastical structures of the Christian church, on one side, and those of the Roman imperial state, on the other, interacted to repress or excite violent action. Finally, the meaning and construction of the acts themselves, including the Western idea of suicide, are shown to emerge from the conflict itself.
    • Saints in exile: the Holiness-Pentecostal experience in African American religion and culture

      Sanders, Cheryl Jeanne. (Ann Arbor, Michigan: MPublishing, University of Michigan LibraryNew York :: Oxford University Press,, 1996)
      0195098439
    • Samaria Baptist (Springfield, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historial Records Survey (1938-02-28)
    • “Same-Sex Marriage, and Christian Morality”

      Sutton, Geoffrey (Digital Showcase, 2016-01-01)
    • Samuel H. Miller

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      Portrait of Samuel H. Miller. Written on verso: Samuel H. Miller- Dean of Harvard Divinity School, trustee.
    • Samuel Varnes

      DigitalCommons@Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center, 2016-07-25
      Portrait of Samuel Varnes
    • Samuel, Patrick and Cato: A History of the Dallas Fire of 1860 and its Tragic Aftermath

      Howdeshell, Rebecca; Farmer (1921-2000), William R (SMU Scholar, 1995-01-01)
      In this unpublished work, William R. Farmer (1921-2000), former associate professor of New Testament at Perkins School of Theology, recounts the story of the Dallas Fire of 1860 and the events that followed: the hanging of three innocent African American men and the whipping of many local slaves. Farmer’s work explores the causes of these acts of racial terrorism by presenting and discussing numerous primary resources. Accompanying the book manuscript is a related work: “A Reader for the Study of the Dallas Fire of 1860.” Both documents were created in the late 1990s.
    • Sanctification: Toward A Theology of Pentecostal Social Ethics

      Castellani, Vincent (Digital Showcase, 1997-01-01)
    • Sandy Creek Baptist Church (Louisburg, N.C.) records

      Z. Smith Reynolds Library Special Collections and Archives (2013-03-01)
    • Sandy Run Baptist Church (Roxobel N.C.) records

      Z. Smith Reynolds Library Special Collections and Archives (2013-01-25)