• Brigg's Chapel Baptist (Summerton, S.C.)

      Boykin, Lulie H.; South Carolina Historical Records Survey (1937-10-01)
    • Briggers A.M.E. (N. Jordan, S.C.)

      Boykin, Lulie H.; South Carolina Historical Records Survey (1937-11-15)
    • Bright Star Baptist (Holly Hill, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historial Records Survey (1939-04-30)
    • Brimer Branch A.M.E. (Holly Hill, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historial Records Survey (1939-03-30)
    • Brown's Baptist Church (Norlina, N.C.) records

      Z. Smith Reynolds Library Special Collections and Archives (2012-02-22)
    • Brown's Chapel (Cameron, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historical Records Survey (1937-12-15)
    • Brown's Chapel (Chesnee, S. C.)

      Taylor, Jean L.; South Carolina Historical Records Survey (University of South Carolina. South Caroliniana Library, 1937-10-30)
    • Building a native church among the Zulu tribe of South Africa

      Park, Mary Chapman. (1942.Princeton Theological Seminary Library, 1942)
    • Building commission for the new church Kroonstad-North [translated from Afrikaans]

      Unknown (Kerkbode, 2006-04-12)
      A group photo of the building commission for the new church building for the congregation Kroonstad-North.
    • “Building Jerusalem? Models of Megachurch in England”

      Cartledge, Mark J.; Davies, Andrew (Digital Showcase, 2012-01-01)
    • Building on Heritage, Preserving Heritage: Music Work in Southern Africa, 1976-2016

      Dargie, Dave (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016-10-17)
      The Constitution on the Liturgy of the Second Vatican Council opened the way for the use of folk music in Catholic worship. The author’s work in African church music grew out of this. Lack of official policy for the conservation of Southern Africa’s musical heritage led the author to use opportunities arising from church music work to record and document traditional music. Later he was given the opportunity to bring traditional music into the syllabuses of the Fort Hare University music department. Although not a stated policy this clearly suited the post-apartheid university leadership. The article traces the work of the author in these fields.
    • Bull Swamp Baptist (Orangeburg, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historial Records Survey (1937-12-30)
    • Burning Hate: The Torching of Black Churches

      Muwakkil, Salim (ScholarWorks at UMass Boston, 1997-06-21)
      Nearly 100 predominantly Black churches have been torched since 1990, their congregations forced to watch in horror as the very centers of their communities were consumed by the flames of racial hatred. Americans of all races have recoiled in shock—and often with genuine shame—as the attacks have escalated in past months. But despite President Clinton's call for interracial solidarity and the belated appeals of white evangelical Christian leaders for racial reconciliation, many African Americans are left wondering whether white America grasps the meaning and significance of this reign of terror.
    • “Burning its Way into Every Nation: The Experience of the Spirit in Early Pentecostal Missions”

      Anderson, Allan (Digital Showcase, 2007-01-01)
      The beginning of the twentieth century constituted the formative time in Pentecostalism, in which the experience of the Spirit was the central motivation for sending missionaries out all over the world. This paper traces the role of experience among these first Pentecostal missionaries and how the realities on the field forced them to adjust pragmatically to a different context. The early experiences of “missionary tongues”, whether “genuine” languages or not, had a profound impact on the spread of Pentecostalism outside the western world. Many of the first Pentecostals were convinced that they had received these “missionary tongues” through the baptism of the Spirit, and that when they reached their destinations they would be able to speak miraculously to local people without having to undergo the arduous task of language learning. This paper looks at the formative experiences of some of the foreign Pentecostal missionaries and their so-called “native workers”, the indigenous leaders, and how these experiences molded their activities and decision-making. The Holy Spirit, as the above quotation put it, had entered the hearts of Pentecostals to cause them to rapidly migrate, “hastening away to the ends of the earth”. The baptism in the Spirit could not be limited to one place or nation, but such a great fire would “burn its way into every nation”. For early Pentecostal missionaries, the direct experience of God through the Holy Spirit was the foundation of their doctrine, life, and the primary motivation for missionary practice. This paper seeks to describe the role this experience has played in the global expansion of Pentecostalism and explores the ways in which their experience of God informed and shaped early missionary practices. The first part of this paper considers the international movement of hundreds of independent Pentecostals in the early twentieth century, and four factors creating impetus for this missionary thrust. The first three of these factors are treated by way of introduction to the fourth, the role of the experience of the Spirit. The second part of the paper looks at how this experience of the Spirit affected the missionary effort and outlines four consequences.
    • Bushy Pond Baptist (Norway, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historial Records Survey (1938-07-30)
    • Business as mission and mission as business : case studies of financially sustainable Christian mission ventures with a focus on Anglican diocese in East Africa

      Mugambi, J. N. Kanyua; Tongoi, Dennis Obura (2017-06-21)
      Anglican dioceses established by The Church Mission Society and other Western founded Christian denominations in East Africa were envisaged to grow and become self-governing, self-propagating and self-supporting. The first two goals(to be self governing and self-propagating) have more or less been achieved. The third goal (the pursuit of self-support) is at a critical stage, especially considering that resources, in terms of funding and personnel, are in decline. This research sought to document the factors that contribute to, or hinder, the role that lay people (business
 people in particular) can play in sustaining the ministry and mission of Anglican dioceses.
 The research methods chosen for data collection consisted of interactive fieldwork. In this, formal and informal interviews were conducted. The interviewees were selected mainly from Anglican dioceses, with their input being corroborated by Methodists, Evangelical Lutheran and Presbyterian Church leaders from Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Interviews were conducted, first, with church leaders who were in office at the time when John Gatu declared a moratorium on Western missionaries in 1974. Next came interviews with leaders of the 1990s and 2000s.
 For each leader, a corroborative project was documented. A limited quantitative questionnaire was administered for triangulation purposes.The data were analysed to identify the themes and patterns that emerged.
 This phase was followed by an extensive literature review. The research
 methodology utilised the Praxis Cycle, developed by Cochrane, De Gruchy and Peterson (1990) in their book, In Word and Deed,which has its roots in the “see, judge, act” method of the Belgian Cardinal, Joseph Cardijn,founder of the Young Christian Workers movement. The analysis allowed me to examine the interplay between business and mission, using the seven-point Praxis Cycle, modified by JNJ Kritzinger (2008:771) to assess the spirituality of BAM and its contribution to
 Christian mission. Other movements of the Praxis Cycle are practical projects, theological reflection, contextual analysis, ecclesial analysis, agency and reflexivity.
 The literature review was analysed in terms of four primary dimensions: Business as Business (profit maximisation), Mission as Business(profit from philanthropy),Mission as Mission(philanthropy from profits), and Business as Mission (profit for the common good). The fourth dimension was explored as an overarching vision for churches seeking to grow towards financial sustainability. Also considered was how such sustainability could be implemented in the East African context.
    • "But where's the bloody horse?" Die NG teologie in Afrika

      Van Niekerk, A.S. (Attie) (Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2009-09-14)
      The relation between theology in the Dutch Reformed Church and the African world is discussed with reference to: (a) the relation between theology in the Dutch Reformed Church and science, and specifically the university with its policies; (b) the relation between science and the African world, especially as seen by African writers; and (c) the way that certain theologians in the Dutch Reformed Church have dealt with the
 African world and African theology. The relation between theology and praxis depends on the conception of truth held by the theologian involved. If truth is seen as the product of the theologian as subject (each subject produces his or her own truth), or if truth is identified with propositions or statements, the related theology can be expected to be unrelated to the praxis. A relation concept of truth is where God addresses a person and confronted by the realities of life and discovers truth in these relationships. Such a concept of truth does offer the prospect of a theology that interacts with reality. It is suggested that opportunities to engage existentially in such relations should become a strong characteristic of the way in which our theology is structured.
    • "But where's the bloody horse?" Die NG teologie in Afrika

      Van Niekerk, A.S. (Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2009-09-14)
      The relation between theology in the Dutch Reformed Church and the African world is discussed with reference to: (a) the relation between theology in the Dutch Reformed Church and science, and specifically the university with its policies; (b) the relation between science and the African world, especially as seen by African writers; and (c) the way that certain theologians in the Dutch Reformed Church have dealt with the African world and African theology. The relation between theology and praxis depends on the conception of truth held by the theologian involved. If truth is seen as the product of the theologian as subject (each subject produces his or her own truth), or if truth is identified with propositions or statements, the related theology can be expected to be unrelated to the praxis. A relation concept of truth is where God addresses a person and confronted by the realities of life and discovers truth in these relationships. Such a concept of truth does offer the prospect of a theology that interacts with reality. It is suggested that opportunities to engage existentially in such relations should become a strong characteristic of the way in which our theology is structured.
    • Butlers Chapel A.M.E. (Wolfton, S.C.)

      Sinkler, Anna L.; South Carolina Historial Records Survey (1938-02-28)