This collection has a focus on Latin American Christianity and theologies. It is a thematic effort that has been pursued by Globethics.net South America Regional Programme team since 2011, thanks to a small hub of committed librarians, theologians and experts in applied ethics, who have been doing the enormous work of submitting and indexing thousands of documents in this collection. The collection is structured by Globethics.net Theology subjects, and contains mainly documents in Spanish and Portuguese. This collection makes known the theological research in the context of Latin America, while facilitating networking and research on Latin American Theologies locally and globally.

Recent Submissions

  • Hidden heritage: the legacy of the Crypto-Jews

    Jacobs, Janet Liebman (University of California Press, 2002)
    This study of contemporary crypto-Jews - descendants of European Jews forced to convert to Christianity during the Spanish Inquisition - traces the group's history of clandestinely conducting their faith and their present-day efforts to reclaim their past. Janet Liebman Jacobs masterfully combines historical and social scientific theory to fashion a brilliant analysis of hidden ancestry and the transformation of religious and ethnic identity.
  • Religião e política na América Latina : uma análise da legislação dos países

    Oro, Ari Pedro; Ureta, Marcela (2015-11-09)
    O texto está dividido em duas partes. Na primeira, são analisados os vários modelos de relação estabelecidos legalmente nos países da América Latina entre igrejas e Estado, religião e política. Na segunda, são analisadas as implicações desses modelos para as temáticas da secularização e da liberdade religiosa.
  • Non-Systematic Theology

    Van Dyke, Louis Y. (Digital Collections @ Dordt, 1979-09-01)
  • Community, Power, and Memory in Díaz Ordaz's Mexico: The 1968 Lynching in San Miguel Canoa, Puebla

    Chrisman, Kevin M. (DigitalCommons@University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 2013-04-19)
    On September 14th, 1968, approximately 1,000 enraged inhabitants wielding assorted makeshift weapons formed a lynch mob that brutally murdered four people and injured three others in San Miguel Canoa, Mexico. According to the generally accepted account, Canoa’s inhabitants feared that recently-arrived Universidad Autónoma de Puebla employees, in town on a weekend mountain-climbing expedition, were in actuality communist agitators threatening the town’s social order. The lynching in Canoa received limited press coverage and was subsequently overshadowed by the much larger government orchestrated Tlatelolco massacre that occurred in Mexico City, on October 2, 1968. While Tlatelolco remains an important historic event from late 1960s Mexico, the Canoa lynching and its aftermath reveals powerful social tensions that enveloped rural Mexico during the Cold War. These tensions not only contributed to the lynching but also served as an engine that produced competing narratives about the incident and the larger issues of community, power and memory. I propose Canoa was not culturally isolated or separated as a traditional rural community but intricately connected to mainstream Mexican politics, migration, and culture. Canoa’s residents were deeply connected to the national political environment presided over by President Gustavo Díaz Ordaz, and local and regional sociopolitical concerns. These layers of political culture filtered into Canoa and were interpreted by the town’s residents according to their unique historical experiences. By contextualizing the Canoa lynching into the larger narrative of the Cold War as related to Mexico, I hope to not only add to the historiography of the Díaz Ordaz and Luis Echeverría years but also place Canoa into the greater narrative of 1968 and the student movement. A later film about the lynching reshaped the historic memory of the events. The film Canoa (Cazals, 1975) became the dominant public memory of the lynching. Due in part to Cazals’ documentary-style production, this dramatic fictional depiction influenced how Mexicans perceived the rural countryside during the Cold War, and sanitized the memory of the Canoa lynching in a manner that reflected the policies of President Luis Echeverría. This study focuses on the power of film representation in the production and consumption of public memory. Adviser: James A. Garza
  • "Cuando Actuamos, Actuamos Juntos": Understanding the Intersections of Religion, Activism, and Citizenship within the Latino Community in Indianapolis

    Hyatt, Susan B.; Dickerson-Putman, Jeanette; Vogt, Wendy A.; Logan, Ryan Iffland (2014)
    Undocumented immigration from Latin America is a heated and divisive topic in United States' politics. Politicians in Washington, D.C. are debating new legislation which would provide a pathway to citizenship for some 11 million undocumented immigrants. While several federal immigration reform bills were debated in the early 2000s, each one failed in either the House of Representatives or in the Senate. The Indianapolis Congregation Action Network (IndyCAN), a grassroots activist group in Indianapolis, is organizing the Latino community through faith and shared political goals. Undocumented Latino immigrants are utilizing IndyCAN as a method to influence progressive policy change. However, anti-immigrant groups challenge these efforts by attempting to define who can be considered an "American" and are attempting to block legislation due to their negative perceptions of Latinos. Debates about citizenship have racial discourses and reveal the embeddedness of race and ethnicity. Despite this, many Latino immigrants are forging their own identities in the United States and are engaging in a political system that refuses to grant them a legal status. Through an enactment of activism called la fe en acción [faith in action], these immigrants ground their political organizing with IndyCAN and attempt to appeal to the religious faith of politicians. I explore issues of race, political engagement, and religion in the lives of Indianapolis’ Latino community. In this case study, I demonstrate that IndyCAN is acting as a vehicle through which undocumented Latino immigrants are engaging in the political process. This political involvement occurs through religious strategies that seem apolitical yet are implicitly an enactment of activism. Ultimately, I reveal how undocumented Latino immigrants in Indianapolis are impacting the political process regardless of their legal status.
  • Un cuento satírico en medio del debate sobre el darwinismo en México

    Fernández Delgado, Miguel A, MAFD (Scholar Commons, 2014-10-09)
    Charles Darwin's theory of biological evolution of species was accepted or rejected by Mexican scientists, including Gabino Barreda, representative of Comte's philosophy. It was also included by Justo Sierra in a history book for the Escuela Nacional Preparatoria, a decision which raised a lot of criticism from conservative groups. It is also discussed the implications of social Darwinism in the early Twentieth Century Mexico. The document we offer is a satire published in those years, which resembles the tone of Swift's Gulliver Travels.
  • Becoming Evangelical in Rural Costa Rica: A Study of Religious Conversion and Evangelical Faith and Practice

    Epp, Jared M.H. (2014)
    Almost daily emotional worship pours from a warehouse-sized evangelical church in the small rural community of Santa Cruz, Costa Rica. Within twenty years an evangelical presence has gone from virtually non-existent to standing alongside the Catholic Church in the area’s religious landscape. Scenarios like this are going on throughout Latin America as evangelical faith has become firmly rooted in the region. In this thesis I provide another ethnographic research context to the growing body of literature focused on Pentecostalism/evangelicalism in Latin America. Like others addressing this dynamic, I explore the factors and motivations that lead people to become evangelical. I approach these questions with particular emphasis on the characteristics of evangelical faith as it is constructed and practiced during church services. Through participant observation during church services and interviews with practicing evangelicals in and around Santa Cruz, I highlight the relationship between the characteristics of an evangelical faith and the factors and motivations that lead people to seek it. To be religiously active in the manner of my informants requires deep commitment and is not a faith adopted and practiced lightly. Those who become evangelical and sustain the demanding practice are likely to seek it for spiritual solutions to difficult life situations.
  • Community, Power, and Memory in Díaz Ordaz's Mexico: The 1968 Lynching in San Miguel Canoa, Puebla

    Chrisman, Kevin M. (DigitalCommons@University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 2013-04-19)
    On September 14th, 1968, approximately 1,000 enraged inhabitants wielding assorted makeshift weapons formed a lynch mob that brutally murdered four people and injured three others in San Miguel Canoa, Mexico. According to the generally accepted account, Canoa’s inhabitants feared that recently-arrived Universidad Autónoma de Puebla employees, in town on a weekend mountain-climbing expedition, were in actuality communist agitators threatening the town’s social order. The lynching in Canoa received limited press coverage and was subsequently overshadowed by the much larger government orchestrated Tlatelolco massacre that occurred in Mexico City, on October 2, 1968. While Tlatelolco remains an important historic event from late 1960s Mexico, the Canoa lynching and its aftermath reveals powerful social tensions that enveloped rural Mexico during the Cold War. These tensions not only contributed to the lynching but also served as an engine that produced competing narratives about the incident and the larger issues of community, power and memory. I propose Canoa was not culturally isolated or separated as a traditional rural community but intricately connected to mainstream Mexican politics, migration, and culture. Canoa’s residents were deeply connected to the national political environment presided over by President Gustavo Díaz Ordaz, and local and regional sociopolitical concerns. These layers of political culture filtered into Canoa and were interpreted by the town’s residents according to their unique historical experiences. By contextualizing the Canoa lynching into the larger narrative of the Cold War as related to Mexico, I hope to not only add to the historiography of the Díaz Ordaz and Luis Echeverría years but also place Canoa into the greater narrative of 1968 and the student movement. A later film about the lynching reshaped the historic memory of the events. The film Canoa (Cazals, 1975) became the dominant public memory of the lynching. Due in part to Cazals’ documentary-style production, this dramatic fictional depiction influenced how Mexicans perceived the rural countryside during the Cold War, and sanitized the memory of the Canoa lynching in a manner that reflected the policies of President Luis Echeverría. This study focuses on the power of film representation in the production and consumption of public memory. Adviser: James A. Garza
  • In science and virtue: The education of Latin American clergy, 1858--1967

    Yeager, Gertrude M; Edwards, Lisa Marie (Tulane University, 2002)
    This dissertation analyzes priestly formation at the Colegio Pio Latino Americano, a residential college for seminarians from the region studying at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. The Colegio Pio Latino Americano has contributed to the creation of a common set of intellectual, cultural, social, and spiritual understandings that have profoundly affected the recent (and future) development of the Roman Catholic Church in modern Latin America. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Catholic clerical education was standardized and professionalized; this occurred substantially through the formation of priests in Rome and the reform of Latin American seminaries following the Roman model. The late development of active relationships between Latin America and the papacy and the critical role of the Church in politics make priestly formation especially relevant in examining the Roman Catholic Church in modern Latin America. Maintaining institutional freedom of action and guiding the faithful in the often-contentious political and social atmosphere of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Latin America required politically savvy and spiritually mature priests who were also adept in theology and the practical aspects of ministry This study begins with a consideration of the dual contexts (Latin American and Roman/European) of Latin American clerical formation in Rome. The central chapters of the study analyze the establishment and support of the College by Latin American clergy and laity and the experiences of seminarians during the years they spent far from home. Finally, it demonstrates the specific ways that the College affected the Church in the region by examining the activities of graduates. When they returned to their home dioceses, priests educated in Rome held leadership positions as seminary professors and administrators, diocesan bishops, and parish priests. Roman-educated priests were instrumental in articulating the regional identity of the Catholic Church and in implanting social Catholicism, the predecessor to liberation theology
  • The Political Origins of Religious Liberty: A Theoretical Outline

    Gill, Anthony (The Berkeley Electronic Press, 2005-01-15)
    Economists of religion have shown a strong relationship between religious pluralism and religious vitality. Likewise, many scholars have associated the presence of religious pluralism in a country to the degree that a government regulates its religious economy. A relatively free religious market enhances pluralism, which in turn promotes religious participation. But this begs a further question: Why do political actors choose to regulate or deregulate the religious economy? In other words, what political factors determine the level and nature of religious liberty? In contrast to explanations that see religious liberty arising from the natural progression of intellectual history, I argue that laws and regulations governing religious organizations are determined by variables that affect the political self-interest of government officials. While there are often strong reasons why politicians would want to create regulations that favor a monopolistic church, political actors will liberalize the religious market when such action favors their political survival, ability to attract government revenue, and/or enhances economic growth and trade. Moreover, religious deregulation is more likely to occur under conditions where it is difficult to suppress natural religious pluralism. The development of religious liberty in the United States and Latin America are offered as preliminary examples of how this deductive theory can be applied.
  • Mythomachines Suspended, Fallen and Jumping Cyborgs

    IT University of Gothenburg/Applied Information Technology; IT-universitetet i Göteborg/Tillämpad informationsteknologi; Hoyos, Ángela (2009-06-29)
    In this text I am presenting the installation and performance project called ‘Automatic bai Chans’ I developed since the spring 2008 mainly in collaboration with Juan Hernández, student of the C: Art: Media Master’s program. We collaborated also with Anna-Sara Åberg from the School of Music and Drama, who brought a valuable input to the project as well. Our initial motivation for the project came from our interest in the jumping rope game. Formally, we became attracted by the connection between the circular movement of the rope while swinging, the sound of the mass of air displaced, and the contrast between the vertical axis of the person jumping and the horizontal axis around which the rope revolves. While reading on the origins of the game we found out about an Easter tradition in the Sussex region, in England, in which people gather to skip the rope as a reminder of the rope Judas used to hang himself after betraying Jesus. We did an automated installation with a suspended figure jumping, and a rope swinging with an envelope and a blank letter attached. We approached the installation elements through physical improvisation leading to the performance work presented. The thesis’ text describes the different projects developed during the master program, referring to analogies as key elements of our creative process. It discusses also the dualism of good and evil in several interpretations of Christianity and the critics addressed to this dualism in The Cyborg Manifesto(1985). I refer to Malinche’ s story as inspiring for the mythic cyborg.
  • Fundamentos filosóficos y jurídicos de la tolerancia religiosa en Europa (siglos xvi-xviii) : el camino hacia la libertad

    José Ignacio Solar Cayón (Casa de Velázquez, 2014-04-01)
    Toleration is a historical concept whose meaning varies depending on the context and on the issues concerned. This article specifically examines the basic elements of the notion of religious toleration as they developed following the breakdown of Christian unity in 16th-century Europe. In this context, the debate on toleration was the first manifestation of philosophy’s concern for the limits of legitimate action by political power, and marked the beginning of a process of assertion of individual autonomy which would eventually culminate in the idea of religious freedom as a natural right. Nevertheless, an analysis of the various political and religious groups driving that process reveals the different roots, philosophies and values underlying each of these notions, and also the complexity of the relations between them.
  • Religious Practices, State Techniques and Clashing Forms of Violence in Colombia’s Peace-building Scenario

    Carlos Manrique (Universidad de los Andes, 2019-01-01)
    This article analyzes the political reach and effects that diverse religious discourses and practices are having in Colombia’s current “peacebuilding” historical juncture. Examining two specific case studies of entanglements of the religious and the juridical, it traces pragmatically differential ways in which the complexes relations between religiosity, statecraft and violence can be played out in Colombia’s “post-agreement” historical epoch. It argues that our analysis of these case studies should move away from secularism, as a normative stance and an interpretative grid, towards a conceptualization of different forms of effective imbrication between the religious, the political and the juridical, that the understanding of the theologico-political in the works of Schmitt, Derrida and Foucault, might help us to think through. In this way we could better evaluate the contrasting political rationalities of diverse pastoral practices oriented by different figures of the theologico-political, and their social and political effects.
  • Religious Practices, State Techniques and Conflicted Forms of Violence in Colombia’s Peacebuilding Scenarios

    Manrique, Carlos A. (2019)
    ABSTRACT This article analyzes the political reach and effects that diverse religious discourses and practices are having in Colombia’s current “peacebuilding” historical juncture. Examining two specific case studies of entanglements of the religious and the juridical, it traces pragmatically differential ways in which the complexes relations between religiosity, statecraft and violence can be played out in Colombia’s “post-agreement” historical epoch. It argues that our analysis of these case studies should move away from secularism, as a normative stance and an interpretative grid, towards a conceptualization of different forms of effective imbrication between the religious, the political and the juridical, that the understanding of the theologico-political in the works of Schmitt, Derrida and Foucault, might help us to think through. In this way we could better evaluate the contrasting political rationalities of diverse pastoral practices oriented by different figures of the theologico-political, and their social and political effects.
  • L’expansion contemporaine du pentecôtisme en Amérique latine : une lecture en termes de champ

    Jean-Pierre Bastian (Presses Universitaires du Mirail, 2017-06-01)
    How may we report the religious diversification mainly through Pentecostalisms in Latin America by trying to construct the logics that underlie it ? The concept of religious field, elaborated by Bourdieu, permits to locate the actors in an investment logic whose stakes and challenges meet a specific interest, the mastery of the field’s reproduction by searching for symbolic and practical hegemony. Therefore, this paper doesn’t aim at describing all of the actors, but at thinking about a configuration of objective relations between positions held by diversified religious actors, relations which are determined by a main challenge which is the object of a war among competing organisations, in this case, the exercice of legitimate religious power in the region.
  • La Iglesia católica en América Latina a la hora del papa Francisco

    Rodolfo de Roux (Presses Universitaires du Mirail, 2017-06-01)
    In Latin-America the developement of religious pluralism, the consolidation of Protestant Pentecostalism Churches, the increase of society’s secularisation and the weakening of catholic hegemony is being confirmed. Facing these challenges, the Catholic Church answered since the 1980s with an institutional strenghtening, a larger power centralisation, a control over theological thinking but also by quelling dissident or alternative tendencies. Within that movement of “returning to the big discipline”, the recent election of pope Francis has blown the winds of the opening and renovation, but the challenges that the Church has to take up, inside as well as outside, are huge.

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