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dc.contributor.authorUhr, John
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-23T14:47:45Z
dc.date.available2019-09-23T14:47:45Z
dc.date.created2016-02-04 16:52
dc.date.issued2015-12-13
dc.identifieroai:digitalcollections.anu.edu.au:1885/85394
dc.identifier1096-7494
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/85394
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/83348
dc.description.abstractDemocracies typically impose onerous regulation on the conduct of bureaucratic officials and remarkably light regulation of the conduct of elected officials. The traditional presumption was that politicians should be allowed to self-regulate. In many democratic regimes, politicians have shown themselves unable to carry this burden of public trust. As a result, political ethics is regulated from a perspective of public distrust, associated with fears of political corruption. Despite my personal reservations about professional ethics models (recorded here by reference to recent fictional work of novelist J.M. Coetzee), I revive a trust-based perspective to make a case for a regime of self-regulation for democratic politicians, based on a democratic hope that politicians can be trusted to act as responsible professionals.
dc.publisherInformation Age Publishing Inc
dc.sourceInternational Public Management Journal
dc.titleProfessional Ethics for Politicians
dc.typeJournal article
ge.collectioncodeBF
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:6443582
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/6443582
ge.lastmodificationdate2016-03-21 12:43
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148650
ge.oai.repositoryid5790
ge.oai.setnameANU Open Access Research
ge.oai.setnameANU Research
ge.oai.setnameOpen Access Research
ge.oai.setspeccom_1885_9051
ge.oai.setspeccom_1885_1
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ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/85394


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