This Globethics.net collection gathers contributions, resources and perspectives on eco-theology, climate justice, and food security from Christian, Churches, and/or other religious traditions. It also contains the Global Survey on Ecotheology, Climate Justice and Food Security in Theological Education and Christian Leadership Development, the presentations and report of the follow up consultation on the same subject held at the Academy of Volos, Demetriades Diocese of Church of Greece, 10-13 March, 2016.

Recent Submissions

  • Conversion and Inclusiveness

    Daniele Rolando (The University of Akureyri, 2019-09-01)
    Is the current notion of religious freedom compatible with the current notion of tolerance? In this paper I will try to prove that this problem exists and that the setting given by Baroncelli to the problem of tolerance, i.e. by way of the revaluation of the virtue of indifference, is the only way to set it correctly. I try to prove this thesis through the analysis of the notion of conversion elaborated by William James in his classic The Varieties of Religious Experience and especially of his notion of ‘being reborn’.
  • Theological Compatibilism and Essential Properties

    Nicola Ciprotti (The University of Akureyri, 2008-03-01)
    Alvin Plantinga defends Theological Compatibilism (TC) and Essentialism about property possession (E). TC is the claim that human freedom to act otherwise and God's essential omniscience are compatible, while E is the claim that every individual entity whatsoever has a modal profile consisting in having both essential and accidental properties. I purport to show that, if E is assumed in the argument for TC, then the latter leads to a very puzzling upshot. I also intend to show that, even if TC is suitably fixed in order to avoid that upshot, TC is still unconvincing in that it merges into one the de re and the de dicto rendering of 'human freedom to act otherwise'; I end up by briefly sketching why the two renderings should instead be kept well apart.
  • Social distancing and environmental stressors in homes during times of COVID-19: an Environmental Psychology perspective

    Karla Patrícia Martins Ferreira; Cynthia de Freitas Melo; Zenith Nara Costa Delabrida; Icaro Moreira Costa; Rochelle de Arruda Moura; Marilia Diógenes Oliveira; Renata Bezerra de Holanda Bessa (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 2020-06-01)
    The objective was to investigate the factors that generate stress in the residential environment of Brazilians during the social distancing measures that were established to control the pandemic of COVID-19. A survey was carried out with 2,000 Brazilians, who answered a sociodemographic questionnaire and a trigger question, with the results respectively analyzed using descriptive statistics in the SPSS software and textual analysis in IRaMuTeQ. The results were organized into five classes that portray factors relating to the Environmental Stress experienced during this period: "The coexistence house" indicates Crowding and loss of privacy; "The sheltering house" is portrayed as a secure and rooted environment; "The sickness house" signals the relationship with mental health problems; "The multifunctional house" demonstrates the need to organize routine and spaces; and "The closed house" exposes the difficulties in regard to the restriction of mobility and with the physical characteristics of the house. It is concluded that the change in the home environment caused stress and, in turn, environmental comfort is a restoration strategy.
  • People-environment relations in the COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil: contributions from a critical Latin American Environmental Psychology

    Raquel Farias Diniz; Nikolas Olekszechen; Tatiana Minchoni; Tadeu Mattos Farias; Ana Paula Soares da Silva; Gustavo Martineli Massola; Laís Pinto de Carvalho (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 2020-09-01)
    The COVID-19 pandemic has placed several sectors of society in the face of the urgent need to rethink people's relations with their surroundings. This article proposes a possible framework for reading the person-environment relations in the pandemic context, considering the Brazilian scenario. Our argument focuses on analyzing the spatialization of social and racial inequalities, determining factors for the spread of COVID-19, and the differences in its impacts, parallel to other readings that environmental psychology has presented for this context. We assume that more traditional approaches have limitations for understanding Latin American specificities, requiring revisions and reorientations of a theoretical-epistemological character and an ethical-political nature. In the end, we outline some propositions, from a critical perspective.
  • In search of the hyphen: thirty-five years of Environmental Psychology in Rio Grande do Norte

    José Q. Pinheiro; Gleice Virgínia Medeiros de Azambuja Elali; Fernanda Fernandes Gurgel; Raquel Farias Diniz; Tadeu Mattos Farias; Enric Pol (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 2019-03-01)
    We present a historical and theoretical-methodological panorama of the studies by Grupo de Estudos Pessoa-Ambiente (People-Environment Research Group, GEPA) and their inclusion in the context of environmental psychology. The authors expressed the theoretical-methodological diversity of the area, presented here in terms of the psychological aspects of the relationships between people, climate change and renewable energy sources, underscoring the invisibility and instantaneity of energy; the psychology-sustainability interface, which investigates the psychosocial dimensions of pro-ecological and pro-environmental behaviors; rurality, denoting the scarcity of instrumental and theoretical perspectives that bring psychology and the sociocultural specificities observed closer together; cities, in which studies reveal the tension between the capitalist production of space and the right to the city; and daily settings, which focus on housing, schools and open areas, proposing concepts such as a socioenvironmental image and psychological accessibility. We conclude by showing the connection between group activity and the stresses, developments and challenges faced by the field at the global level.
  • The fake, the flimsy, and the fallacious: demarcating arguments in real life

    Boudry, MaartenCA09LW010020024092918020002576900000-0003-0932-3394F97D7BD2-F0ED-11E1-A9DE-61C894A0A6B4; Paglieri, Fabio; Pigliucci, Massimo (2015)
    Philosophers of science have given up on the quest for a silver bullet to put an end to all pseudoscience, as such a neat formal criterion to separate good science from its contenders has proven elusive. In the literature on critical thinking and in some philosophical quarters, however, this search for silver bullets lives on in the taxonomies of fallacies. The attractive idea is to have a handy list of abstract definitions or argumentation schemes, on the basis of which one can identify bad or invalid types of reasoning, abstracting away from the specific content and dialectical context. Such shortcuts for debunking arguments are tempting, but alas, the promise is hardly if ever fulfilled. Different strands of research on the pragmatics of argumentation, probabilistic reasoning and ecological rationality have shown that almost every known type of fallacy is a close neighbor to sound inferences or acceptable moves in a debate. Nonetheless, the kernel idea of a fallacy as an erroneous type of argument is still retained by most authors. We outline a destructive dilemma we refer to as the Fallacy Fork: on the one hand, if fallacies are construed as demonstrably invalid form of reasoning, then they have very limited applicability in real life . On the other hand, if our definitions of fallacies are sophisticated enough to capture real-life complexities, they can no longer be held up as an effective tool for discriminating good and bad forms of reasoning. As we bring our schematic “fallacies” in touch with reality, we seem to lose grip on normative questions. Even approaches that do not rely on argumentation schemes to identify fallacies fail to escape the Fallacy Fork, and run up against their own version of it
  • Ntem Valley (south Cameroon)

    Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle (MNHN); APFT ; Commission Européenne; Études des Structures, des Processus d’Adaptation et des Changements de l’Espace (ESPACE) ; Université Côte d'Azur (UCA)-Avignon Université (AU)-Université Nice Sophia Antipolis (... - 2019) (UNS) ; COMUE Université Côte d'Azur (2015-2019) (COMUE UCA)-COMUE Université Côte d'Azur (2015-2019) (COMUE UCA)-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)-Aix Marseille Université (AMU); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS); Gouvernance, Risque, Environnement, Développement (GRED) ; Université Paul-Valéry - Montpellier 3 (UPVM)-Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD [France-Sud])-Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier (Montpellier SupAgro) ; Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement (Institut Agro)-Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement (Institut Agro); Savoirs, ENvironnement et Sociétés (SENS) ; Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (Cirad)-Université Paul-Valéry - Montpellier 3 (UPVM)-Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD); Centre d’Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive (CEFE) ; Université Paul-Valéry - Montpellier 3 (UPVM)-Centre international d'études supérieures en sciences agronomiques (Montpellier SupAgro)-École pratique des hautes études (EPHE) ; Université Paris sciences et lettres (PSL)-Université Paris sciences et lettres (PSL)-Université de Montpellier (UM)-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)-Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD [France-Sud])-Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier (Montpellier SupAgro) ; Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement (Institut Agro)-Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement (Institut Agro)-Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement (INRAE); Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD); Commission Européenne; European Project: APFT; et al. (HAL CCSD, 2001)
    International audience
  • Brendan Myers, Reclaiming Civilization: A case for optimism for the future of humanity. A Study of the Sacred, Part Three (Gatineau: Northwest Passage Books, 2016)

    Giorgio Baruchello (The University of Akureyri, 2018-03-01)
    A book review of: Brendan Myers, Reclaiming Civilization: A case for optimism for the future of humanity. A Study of the Sacred, Part Three (Gatineau: Northwest Passage Books, 2016)
  • C. Raudvere & J.P. Schjödt (eds.), More Than Mythology – Narratives, Ritual Practices and Regional Distribution in Pre-Christian Scandinavian Religions (Lund: Nordic Academic Press)

    Tero Mustonen (The University of Akureyri, 2013-03-01)
    A book review of; Raudvere, Catharina & Schjödt, Jens Peter: More Than Mythology – Narratives, Ritual Practices and Regional Distribution in Pre-Christian Scandinavian Religions
  • Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough, Danielle Marie Cudmore and Stefan Donecker (eds.), Imagining the Supernatural North (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2016)

    Sara Culeddu (The University of Akureyri, 2019-03-01)
    A review of the book: Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough, Danielle Marie Cudmore & Stefan Donecker (eds.), Imagining the Supernatural North (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2016)
  • W. Friese et al. (eds.), Ascending and Descending the Acropolis: Movement in Athenian Religion; and T. Møbjerg et al. (eds.), The Hammerum Burial Site: Customs and Clothing in the Roman Iron Age (Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 2019)

    Giorgio Baruchello (The University of Akureyri, 2020-03-01)
    A review of the books: W. Friese et al. (eds.), Ascending and Descending the Acropolis: Movement in Athenian Religion; and T. Møbjerg et al. (eds.), The Hammerum Burial Site: Customs and Clothing in the Roman Iron Age (Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 2019)
  • Home is not always a safe place: A bioecological approach for the violence in pandemic time

    Simone dos Santos Paludo; Danielly Bart do Nascimento; Silvia Renata Magalhães Lordello; Edinete Maria Rosa (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 2020-06-01)
    The study objective was to discuss the panorama of Covid-19 and impacts on violence committed at home through Bioecological Theory and to propose strategic actions to guarantee rights and protection. Apparently, due to the need to stay at home, risk situations can be maximized in homes, worsened by the absence or minimization of the performance of protective contexts such as schools, social assistance institutions, and health centers, among others. There is an increase in danger in families due to fear of contagion and death, added by the overload of household chores concern with subsistence and other factors that differ depending on socioeconomic conditions. The characteristics of the person, the proximal processes, the contexts, and the time are identified based on this framework. We concluded about the need for a social mobilization on strategic actions of combat and confrontation, which should be undertaken by everyone, and concrete measures are proposed for this end.
  • L’agdal du Yagour.Religion populaire, développement et conservation de la biodiversité dans le Haut Atlas

    EHESS, LAS; ASIC UAB; Laboratoire Population-Environnement-Développement (LPED) ; Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD)-Aix Marseille Université (AMU); Domínguez, Pablo (HAL CCSD, 2006-10-26)
    International audience
  • Supplementary Material from Collective ritual and social support networks in rural South India.

    Eleanor A. Power (5169521) (2018-05-30)
    All supplementary information, tables, and figures.
  • Mitä on olla kaupunki? : kirja-arvostelu

    Kanerva, Raimo (Helsinki : Tulevaisuuden tutkimuksen seura, 1986-, 2007-10-12)
  • Pembacaan Eco Hermeneutic terhadap Narasi Air dalam Kejadian 26:12-33

    Ndolu, Nelci Nafalia; Setio, Robert; Listijabudi, Daniel Kurniawan (Sekolah Tinggi Teologi Intheos Surakarta, 2021-12-28)
    Abstract. Natural restoration poses a current theological challenge. Readings that support adaptation, mitigation and recovery efforts are the purpose of writing articles to respond to these challenges. The method used in reading the selected text, namely Genesis 26:12-33, is eco hermeneutic as proposed by Norman Charles Habel. The results showed that Gerar water was compassionate toward Isaac, his family and animals as refugee in the Philistines during that time of famine. However, water stopped serving Isaac because Isaac became unfriendly to him by exploiting him when he was starving. From there Isaac was aware of Water's sovereignty in his encounter with the wells of Sitnah, Esek and Rehoboth. At the same time, Isaac realized that God as the source of Water defends Water in an effort to maintain its intrinsic value for all people fairly.Abstrak. Pemulihan alam menjadi tantangan berteologi saat ini. Pembacaan yang mendukung upaya adaptasi, mitigasi dan pemulihan komunitas alam menjadi tujuan dari penulisan dari artikel untuk merespon tantangan tersebut. Metode yang digunakan dalam pembacaan teks terpilih adalah eco hermeneutic sebagaimana yang digagas oleh Norman Charles Habel. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa Air Gerar berbela rasa dengan Ishak, keluarga dan hewan-hewannya sebagai pengungsi di Filistin selama masa kelaparan saat itu. Namun Air berhenti melayani Ishak karena Ishak menjadi tidak ramah kepadanya dengan mengeksploitasi dirinya saat kelaparan. Dari situ Ishak sadar akan kedaulatan Air dalam perjumpaan dengan sumur Sitnah, Esek dan Rehobot, sekaligus menyadari Tuhan sebagai sumber Air membela Air dalam upayanya mempertahankan nilai intrinsiknya bagi semua orang secara adil.
  • “The earth is your mosque”: narrative perspectives of environmental health and education in the Holy Quran

    Aboul-Enein, Basil H. (ScholarsArchive@JWU, 2017-09-22)
    Philosophical and ideological arguments have been proposed in support of the importance of the environment and environmental health. An argument that has been given recent attention includes the religious argument. The Holy Quran is regarded as the authoritative text on both spiritual and behavioral guidance for Muslims worldwide. With the ever-growing challenge to tackle and address issues facing the environment and environmental health, various approaches and proposals have prompted calls for broad environmental health education solutions to reduce, if not reverse, the growing issues facing the environment. This narrative review examines relevant verses in the Holy Quran and identifies the chapters and verses where keywords and phrases are mentioned relevant to the environment and environmental health as a whole. A total of 88 verses in 42 Quranic chapters were identified with a considerable emphasis placed on the importance of water resource management and water conservation, environmental justice, plant conservation, biodiversity, sustainability, and environmental stewardship. These results suggest that the Holy Quran could serve as an influential medium and educational resource for culturally congruent environmental health interventions in diverse populations, particularly in Muslim communities, and for improving and maintaining a healthy environment.
  • Wādi Ramm, Jordan: Economic, Religious, Social and Environmental History: Proceedings of the International Symposium at Wādī Ramm

    Histoire et Cultures de l'Antiquité et du Moyen Âge (HISCANT-MA) ; Université de Lorraine (UL); Groupe de Recherche et d'Etudes sur la Méditerranée et le Moyen-Orient (GREMMO) ; Université Lumière - Lyon 2 (UL2)-Sciences Po Lyon - Institut d'études politiques de Lyon (IEP Lyon) ; Université de Lyon-Université de Lyon-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS); Nancy University (HISCANT-MA Histoire et Cultures de l'Antiquité Grecque et Romaine et Moyen Âge); GREMMO-Groupe de recherche et d'étude sur la Méditerranée et le Proche-Orient (CNRS); Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority; Cooperation and Cultural Affairs Departments of French Embassy, Amman, Jordan.; French Institute at the Middle East (IFPO); Saba Farès; Fadi Balaawi; Géraldine Chatelard; et al. (HAL CCSDDe Boccard, 2013)
    International audience
  • " A preliminary report on the forth Season of the Wâdi Iram Epigraphical, Geographical and Archaeological Survey "

    Histoire et Sources des Mondes antiques (HiSoMA) ; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)-Université Jean Monnet [Saint-Étienne] (UJM)-Université Jean Moulin - Lyon 3 (UJML) ; Université de Lyon-Université de Lyon-Université Lumière - Lyon 2 (UL2)-École normale supérieure - Lyon (ENS Lyon); Department of Antiquities of Jordan (DoAJ); Sous-Direction des Sciences Humaines et de l'Archéologie, Ministère des Affaires Étrangères Français ; CNRS; université Nancy 2; Farès-Drappeau, Saba; Zayadine, Fawzi; Abbès, Frédéric (HAL CCSDAl-Mamlakaẗ al-urdumiyyaẗ al-hāšimiyyaẗ, 2001)
    International audience
  • Christian monasticism on the eve of Islam: Kilwa (Saudi Arabia) - new evidence

    Histoire et Cultures de l'Antiquité et du Moyen Âge (HISCANT-MA) ; Université de Lorraine (UL); Groupe de Recherche et d'Etudes sur la Méditerranée et le Moyen-Orient (GREMMO) ; Université Lumière - Lyon 2 (UL2)-Sciences Po Lyon - Institut d'études politiques de Lyon (IEP Lyon) ; Université de Lyon-Université de Lyon-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS); Farès, Saba (HAL CCSDWiley, 2011-11)
    International audience

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