• Caboclos e Orixás no Terreiro: modos de conexão e possibilidades de simbiose

      Miriam C. M. Rabelo; Ricardo Aragão
      Resumo Entidades brasileiras, donas da terra, caboclos são presença marcante nos candomblés de Salvador, onde são cultuados os orixás, divindades africanas. Neste trabalho, discutimos o modo como eles se conectam no terreiro de candomblé e nos corpos dos adeptos. Procuramos mostrar que essas conexões constituem exemplo de simbiose no contexto do que a filósofa Isabelle Stengers denomina ecologia das práticas: são conexões parciais entre seres que, embora relacionados por interesses comuns, seguem divergindo. Conforme argumentamos, oportunidades de simbiose desenham-se na dinâmica espacial do terreiro e apoiam-se em uma ética sutil que maneja a distância entre termos que se atraem.
    • California & the future of environmental law & policy

      Frank, Richard M. (UC Berkeley School of Law, 2008)
      "Earlier this year, the U.C. Berkeley School of Law’s California Center for Environmental Law & Policy (CCELP) sponsored and hosted a major conference, “California & the Future of Environmental Law & Policy.”[1] The purpose of this successful event, which brought together government policymakers, practicing attorneys, scholars and students, was to explore California’s leadership role—regionally, nationally and globally—in formulating and implementing effective environmental policy. The CCELP conference focused on the most critical environmental challenges facing California, the United States and the international community. Panels of experts debated issues of climate change regulatory policy, alternative energy resource development, ocean and coastal issues, necessary linkages between regional land use and transportation policy, water allocation in an era of increasing scarcity, the so-called “Green Chemistry” movement’s efforts to reform hazardous waste policy, and the potential and limitations of litigation as a tool of climate change policy. Another highlight of the conference was the diverse group of plenary speakers: Peter Gleick, president of the Pacific Institute, who spoke on the role water conservation can play in addressing looming domestic and international water shortages; Jared Huffman, environmental lawyer and advocate-turned-state legislator, who shared his environmental vision and platform; and Nobel Prize winner Stephen Chu, director of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley, who offered his sage commentary on the energy-related challenges facing California and the world. Several of the stimulating and insightful presentations from this conference are distilled in the articles, authored by conference participants, found in this issue of Ecology Law Currents. I commend them to your attention. In the same spirit, I offer these introductory comments to summarize my own thoughts—first presented at the conclusion of the CCELP conference[2]—as to how well (or poorly) California has served as national and international leader when it comes to environmental law and policy. The bottom line: in some instances, California has more than lived up to its billing as environmental pioneer and visionary—the envy of the national and international community. In other environmental policy contexts, California gets better marks than the federal government and many of its sister states, but is merely keeping pace with much of the international community. In still others, the State of California has underperformed and, indeed, has much to learn from other states and nations." (p. 1-2)
    • Call for Contributions: "The Capitalist Mode of Power: Critical Engagements with the Power Theory of Value"

      Di Muzio, Tim (2011-01)
      POSTED BY TIM DI MUZIO: The 2009 publication of Nitzan and Bichler’s Capital as Power: A Study of Order and Creorder has unsettled both heterodox and mainstream theorists of political economy, while igniting debate across the social sciences. Building on decades of research, their book offers not only a provocation to all political economists, but also a new approach to studying capital and capitalist sociality as a mode of power. This collection, edited by Tim DiMuzio, aims to bring together scholars and practitioners interested in critically appraising and engaging with the work of Nitzan and Bichler, as well as researchers who use a power theory of value in their own work. Contributions should be no longer than 8,000 words, including notes and references. Papers should be original (i.e. not published elsewhere), unless the author has explicit permission from the copyright holder to republish the piece in this volume. Contributions will be evaluated on their merit, as well as on how well they fit within the larger project. Deadline for Submissions: June 1, 2011 Submissions are to be sent to: tdimuzio@hotmail.com
    • Call for Contributions: "The Capitalist Mode of Power:
 Critical Engagements with the Power Theory of Value"

      Di Muzio, Tim (2011-01)
      POSTED BY TIM DI MUZIO:
 
 The 2009 publication of Nitzan and Bichler’s Capital as Power: A Study of Order and Creorder has unsettled both heterodox and mainstream theorists of political economy, while igniting debate across the social sciences. Building on decades of research, their book offers not only a provocation to all political economists, but also a new approach to studying capital and capitalist sociality as a mode of power.
 
 This collection, edited by Tim DiMuzio, aims to bring together scholars and practitioners interested in critically appraising and engaging with the work of Nitzan and Bichler, as well as researchers who use a power theory of value in their own work. 
 
 Contributions should be no longer than 8,000 words, including notes and references. Papers should be original (i.e. not published elsewhere), unless the author has explicit permission from the copyright holder to republish the piece in this volume. Contributions will be evaluated on their merit, as well as on how well they fit within the larger project.
 
 Deadline for Submissions: June 1, 2011
 
 Submissions are to be sent to: tdimuzio@hotmail.com
    • Call for Papers: "Capital as Power: Broadening the Vista"

      Germain, Randall; Nitzan, Jonathan (2014)
      The theory of capital as power (CasP) offers a radical alternative to mainstream and Marxist theories of capitalism. It argues that capital symbolizes and quantifies not utility or labour but organized power writ large, and that capitalism is best understood and challenged not as a mode of consumption and production, but as a mode of power. 
 
 Over the past decade, the Forum on Capital as Power has organized many lectures, speaker series and conferences. Our most recent international gatherings include "Capitalizing Power: The Qualities and Quantities of Accumulation” (2012), "The Capitalist Mode of Power: Past, Present and Future" (2011), and "Crisis of Capital, Crisis of Theory" (2010).
 
 The 2015 conference seeks to broaden the vista. We are looking for papers that extend and deepen CasP research, compare CasP with other approaches and critique CasP’s methods and findings. Articles could be general or specific, theoretical or empirical, analytical or historical.
 
 The conference is open to everyone, with submissions vetted entirely on merit. We accept applications from established and new researchers, in and outside academia. However, we are particularly interested in submissions from young researchers of all ages, including MA and PhD students, private and public employees and free spirits. If you have an interest in the subject and something important – or potentially important – to say, please apply. 
 
 Financial assistance: we may be able to assist presenters by partly covering the cost of travel and accommodation. This possibility is still tentative; it is conditional on ability to secure sufficient funding. 
 
 Deadline for abstract submissions: March 20, 2015.
    • Call for Papers: "Capitalizing Power: The Qualities and Quantities of Accumulation"

      Cochrane, DT; Hynes, David; McMahon, James; Nitzan, Jonathan; Singh, Morgan (2011)
      Keynote speakers: * Jeffrey Harrod, University of Amsterdam -- Global Weimarism: The Demise of Cohesive Global Power? * Herman Schwartz, University of Virginia -- Intellectual Property Rights, Collective Action, and the Continuing Power of "Finance" * Justin Podur, York University -- Nature, Capital and Commodification: Ecology and the Capital as Power Framework * J.J. McMurtry, York University -- Community Capital: The Pitfalls and Promise of Local Power * Jonathan Nitzan, York University -- No Way Out: Crime, Punishment and the Limits of Power With the global crisis lingering, many now wonder how capital has become so powerful, and what should be done about it. Although we are eager to provide answers, the problem starts with the question itself: what exactly do we mean by ‘capital’, and what does it mean to say that capital is ‘powerful’? The theme of the 2012 conference is the capitalization of power. The focus is the conversion of qualities to quantities: to theorize and research how the qualities of power – the multifaceted interactions of command and obedience, force and submission, violence and resistance – are universalized and discounted to the quantities of capitalization. The conference will comprise two parts: public presentations open to all (September 28), followed by a closed workshop for the conference participants (September 29-30). The workshop will consist of longer presentations, allowing more time for debate, discussion and contemplation. Financial assistance: we may be able to assist presenters by partly covering the cost of travel and accommodation. This possibility is still tentative; it is conditional on our ability to secure sufficient funding. Deadline for abstract submissions: July 21, 2012.
    • Call for Papers: "Crisis of Capital, Crisis of Theory"

      Cochrane, Troy; Brennan, Jordan; Starrs, Sean (2010-01-01)
      This is the first in a series of conferences in heterodox political economy, seeking to develop new ways of understanding capitalism and power. The conference will be held at York University in Toronto on October 29-31, 2010. The deadline for abstract submission is June 30, 2010.
    • Call for Papers: "Crisis of Capital, Crisis of Theory"

      Brennan, Jordan; Cochrane, DT; Starrs, Sean (2010)
      This is the first in a series of conferences in heterodox political economy, seeking to develop new ways of understanding capitalism and power. The conference will be held at York University in Toronto on October 29-31, 2010. The deadline for abstract submission is July 31, 2010.
    • Call for Papers: "The Capitalist Mode of Power: Past, Present, Future"

      Baines, Joseph; Hager, Sandy Brian; Ostojić, Mladen (2011)
      The annual conference series organized by the Forum on Capital as Power brings together a diverse range of radically minded people interested in exploring the concept of power as a basis for re-thinking and re-searching value, capital and accumulation. The second conference in this series will be held at York University in Toronto on October 20-21, 2011. Keynote speakers: Bob Jessop, Michael Perelman and Randall Wray. Extended deadline for abstract submission: July 31, 2011.
    • Call of spirit.

      Homestead, William (University of Montana, 2002-01-01)
    • Called to teach : essays in the honour of Peter S. C. Pothan; a festschrift

      Arles, Siga (1950-); Pothan, Peter S. C. (1941-) (Centre for Contemporary Christianity, 2011)
      Peter Samuel Cecil Pothan, b. 1941, Indian theologist; contributed articles
    • Callie Self Memorial Baptist Church (Greenwood, S.C.)

      Bok Tower Gardens, Undated/99
      The Callie Self Memorial Baptist Church has a traditional carillon of 35 bells. The carillon was installed in the church in 1941. The bells were cast by the van Bergen Bell Foundry (Heiligerlee, NL) and from 1939 to 1940, the carillon was located in the Netherland’s Pavilion at the New York World’s Fair. The instrument was enlarged in 1948 with bells cast by the van Bergen Bell Foundry.
    • Calling Scientific Ideology to Account

      Callahan, Daniel (2015-05-05)
    • Calvary Baptist Church 6 30 2014 Worship

      Roger Kinion (2014-06-29)
      Sunday morning 10:30 worship service at Calvary Baptist Church. Roger Kinion, Pastor Paul George (In View of a Call as Associate Pastor/ Minister of Music)
    • Caminos cruzados : Ensayos en antropología social, etnoecología y etnoeducación

      Catherine Alès; Jean Chiappino
      El presente libro nos ofrece la oportunidad de conocer el avance de las ideas sobre los interrogantes más destacados de la investigación socio-antropológica y lingüística que se realiza actualmente en Venezuela y en sus espacios limítrofes, en Brasil y Colombia. El lector encontrará también ejemplos de sociedades africanas -de Benín y de Costa de Marfil- que dan materia de reflexión y de comparación. Esta obra es la expresión de la riqueza de las problemáticas cuando, ajustándose al seno del conocimiento, la antropología integra los diferentes puntos de vista al tomarse el tiempo de cruzar el camino de las disciplinas afines. A partir de programas de investigación-participación o experiencias más concentradas en la investigación fundamental sin olvidar, por lo tanto, los intereses indígenas, las diversas contribuciones dan cuenta de las principales preocupaciones contemporáneas de las ciencias sociales. Se observa particularmente una doble orientación en los estudios. Una intenta superar los modelos explicativos monofactoriales y formular análisis que consideran diversos acercamientos, la otra trata de establecer vínculos entre la teoría y la práctica social. Ambos objetivos ilustran un mismo esfuerzo para establecer relaciones entre diferentes campos del conocimiento e integrar sus aportes específicos.
    • Can the <i>Song of Songs</i> be described (also) as a form of dark green religion?

      Hendrik Viviers (AOSIS, 2016-03-01)
      <p>Bron Taylor defines dark green religion as: �� a deep sense of belonging to and connectedness in nature, whilst perceiving the earth and its living systems to be sacred and interconnected�. It not only emphasises a felt kinship with the rest of life but also evokes awe, wonderment and humility towards nature that binds to something �greater than oneself�. Do the intimate �oneness� and living in the moment of the two young lovers in the Song also extend to a diminishing of the self and an experience of oneness with a greater, timeless, mysterious reality? In order to determine whether the Song of Songs complies with a form of nature spirituality, the notions of belonging, interconnectedness and sacredness were investigated as they appear in this ancient book of love. It was found that the Song is representative of a form of dark green religion of a non-doctrinaire, immanent kind. It exhibits ubiquitously the notions of belonging and connection (kinship with nature, an interconnectedness and interdependency of the web of life) and the sacredness of the earth and its inhabitants (their intrinsic worth that evokes awe, wonderment and humility). The experience of sensuality, living mindfully in the moment, transforms into a timeless spirituality of connection to �another, mysterious world�.</p><p><strong>Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications:</strong> The relevance of reader-oriented appreciations of biblical texts, notably ecological hermeneutics, is demonstrated; this approach can also be extended to other sacred texts apart from the Bible; furthermore, it points to the need for the ongoing dialogue with the natural sciences.</p><p><strong>Keywords:</strong> dark green religion; nature spirituality; belonging;interconnectedness; sacredness; Song of Songs</p>
    • Can the song of songs be described (also) as a form of dark green religion?

      Viviers, H. (2016)
      Abstract: Bron Taylor defines dark green religion as follows: “…a deep sense of belonging to and connectedness in nature, while perceiving the earth and its living systems to be sacred and interconnected.” It not only emphasises a felt kinship with the rest of life, but it evokes awe, wonderment and humility towards nature that binds to something “greater than oneself.” Does the intimate “oneness” and living in the moment of the two young lovers in the Song also extend to a diminishing of the self and an experience of oneness with a greater, timeless, mysterious reality? In order to determine whether the Song of Songs complies with a form of nature spirituality, the notions of belonging, interconnectedness and sacredness were investigated as they appear in this ancient book of love. It was found that the Song is representative of a form of dark green religion of a non-doctrinaire, immanent kind. It exhibits ubiquitously the notions of belonging and connection (kinship with nature, an interconnectedness and interdependency of the web of life) and the sacredness of the earth and its inhabitants (their intrinsic worth that evokes awe, wonderment and humility). The experience of sensuality, living mindfully in the moment, transforms into a timeless spirituality of connection to “another, mysterious world.”