• E-waste ur ett skyldighetsperspektiv

      Hansson, Lisa (Lunds universitet/Mänskliga rättigheter, 2013)
      The purpose of my essay is primarily to highlight the relevance of an obligation perspective, but also to draw attention to the problems related to e-waste. In my theory, I have mainly used the Onora O'Neill literature on the subject of obligations. To limit my working area, I have chosen to look at the legal and moral obligations. Further delineation is done by focusing on the obligations of the EU. Through textual analysis of legal documents and philosophical literature and the presentation of the problematic situation due to e-waste, I have analyzed the situation from a duty perspective. There is a widespread problem around obligations and e-waste. From an obligation perspective, I answered my research question: What obligations are legally and morally in terms of e-waste? Moral and legal obligations is limited largely to their own nation and do not extend internationally as they should have in the case of e-waste. Norms of consuming lead to negative impact on the earth's resources and increases the amount of e-waste. Based on the situation arising out of the poor e-waste management, both negative and positive obligations are needed to improve the situation that has become for many people in developing countries. For the situation to be sustainable a change is required concerning the consumption of electronics. Moreover, norms of consumption and thoughts of financial gain need to changed and place focus on quality instead of quantity. Obligations to reduce the amount of e-waste are against us, people in developing countries who take direct damage of e-waste and to future generations.
    • E-waste ur ett skyldighetsperspektiv

      Hansson, Lisa (Lunds universitet/Mänskliga rättighetsstudier, 2013)
      The purpose of my essay is primarily to highlight the relevance of an obligation perspective, but also to draw attention to the problems related to e-waste. In my theory, I have mainly used the Onora O&#39;Neill literature on the subject of obligations. To limit my working area, I have chosen to look at the legal and moral obligations. Further delineation is done by focusing on the obligations of the EU. Through textual analysis of legal documents and philosophical literature and the presentation of the problematic situation due to e-waste, I have analyzed the situation from a duty perspective.<br> There is a widespread problem around obligations and e-waste. From an obligation perspective, I answered my research question: What obligations are legally and morally in terms of e-waste?<br> Moral and legal obligations is limited largely to their own nation and do not extend internationally as they should have in the case of e-waste. Norms of consuming lead to negative impact on the earth&#39;s resources and increases the amount of e-waste. Based on the situation arising out of the poor e-waste management, both negative and positive obligations are needed to improve the situation that has become for many people in developing countries. For the situation to be sustainable a change is required concerning the consumption of electronics. Moreover, norms of consumption and thoughts of financial gain need to changed and place focus on quality instead of quantity. Obligations to reduce the amount of e-waste are against us, people in developing countries who take direct damage of e-waste and to future generations.
    • Earth - The Lose Paradise of Happiness

      Kasi, Rayappa A. (Kasi, Rayappa A., 2009)
      "Perhaps every generation has a sense that we stand a crossroad, a place and time where human choices and actions will have severe and long lasting consequences not only for ourselves, but in fact for all who will come after us. It seems in this present day the crossroad is more dramatic and consequential than ever. We are witnesses to a climatic time in the history of the earth we are seeing changes in our planet that no one has seen before. Antarctica continues to melt at an alarming rate, the Grand Canyon, once a place of pristinely clear air, the cleanest air in North America, is now experiencing the effects of pollution and scorching heat pervades much of the world as we have never seen before. Surely one must begin to question these changes in the light of modern development. Under the pretext of creating a science and high technology based society we have allowed progress to ruin our beautiful planet. The question that we have to ponder is whether it is possible even now, although late, to salvage this planet and make it a habitable place for all living things. We seem to have taken this beautiful planet Earth for granted and assumed that it is there forever for us to exploit. While the past is now out of our control, we can still change the future by sensibly reframing our present attitudes and lifestyles." (p. 5)
    • Earth Community Earth Ethics

      Rasmussen, Larry L. (2016-01-08)
    • Earth Ethics

      Shrader-Frechette, Kristin (2016-01-08)
    • Earth habitat : eco-injustice and the church's response

      Hessel, Dieter T. (Fortress Press, 2001)
    • Earth Habitat: Eco-Injustice and the Church's Response

      Hessel, Dieter and Rasmussen, Larry (2016-01-08)
    • Earth Matters: Religion, Nature, and Science in the Ecologies of Contemporary America

      Kripal, Jeffrey J.; Levine, Daniel (2013-09-16)
      Earth Matters examines the relationships between alternative religion in North America and the natural world through the twin lenses of the history of religions and cultural anthropology. Throughout, nature remains a contested ground, defined simultaneously the limits of cultural activity and by an increasing expansion of claims to knowledge by scientific discourses. Less a historical review than a series of fugues of thought, Earth Matters engages with figures like the French vitalist, Georges Canguilhem, the American environmentalist, John Muir; the founder of Deep Ecology, Arne Næss; the collaborators on Gaia Theory, James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis; the physicist and New Age scientist, Fritjof Capra; and the Wiccan writer and activist, Starhawk. These subjects move in spirals throughout the thesis: Canguilhem opens the question of vitalism, the search for a source of being beyond the explanations of the emerging sciences. As rationalism expands its dominance across the scientific landscape, this animating force moves into the natural world, to that protean space between the city and the wild and in the environmental thinkers who initially moved along those boundaries. As the twentieth century moves towards a close, mechanistic thinking simultaneously reaches heights of success previously unimagined and collapses under the demand for complexity posed by quantum physics, by research in genetic interactions, by the continued elusive relationship of mind to health. This allows the wild to return inside through the internalization of consciousness sparked by the American New Age, but also provides a new model to understand the natural world as complex zone open to a wide variety of strategies, including the multiplicities of understanding offered through contemporary neopaganisms. Earth Matters argues for the necessity of the notion of ecology, both as an environmental concern but also as an organizing principle for human thought and behavior. Ecologies are by their nature complex and multi-variegated things dependent upon the surprising and unpredictable interaction of radically different organisms, and it is through this model that we are best able to understand not only ourselves but also our communities and our efforts to make sense of the external world.
    • Earth revealing, earth healing : ecology and Christian theology

      Edwards, Denis (1943-) (Liturgical Press, 2001)
    • Earth Stewardship and the Missio Dei: Participating in the Care and Redemption of All God Has Made

      Carlson, David M. (Digital Commons @ Luther Seminary, 2016-01-01)
      This explanatory sequential mixed methods research project surveyed leaders and conducted focus group interviews in an ELCA synod. It evaluated earthkeeping practices and perceptions using several lenses: sustainability, globalization, global civil society, nature as active subject, stewardship as participating in God’s mission, perichoresis as modeling reciprocal relationships with nature, eschatological themes of redemption and reformation, and sacramental imagination. Results revealed concern about environmental challenges, openness to earth stewardship, significant differences by political preference, and more pronounced personal than congregational practices. Congregations with creation care teams have promising capacity to exhibit earth stewardship’s missional character through personal, congregational, and community engagement.
    • Earth Story, Sacred Story

      Conlon, James (2016-01-08)
    • Earth, Body, and Spirit: Radical Motherhood and the Female Voice in So Far From God

      Kawamura, Kiana (Digital Commons @ Colby, 2017-01-01)
      Ana Castillo’s novel So Far From God (1993) tells the story of Sofi and her four daughters, Esperanza, Fe, Caridad, and La Loca, as they grow up in Tome, a small town in rural New Mexico. Through a thorough analysis of Sofi as a mother, my thesis proposes the concept of radical motherhood to understand the complex relationship between motherhood and activism, spirituality, and female empowerment developed in Castillo’s novel. Specifically, my analysis demonstrates how la Virgen de Guadalupe, an idealized mother figure in Chicano culture, and la Llorona, a mythologized bad mother, come together in Sofi’s character to catalyze her process of conscientización, or increasing social awareness. I argue that Sofi’s conscientización stems directly from her understanding of each of her daughters’ experiences with environmental injustice, subversive spirituality, and, ultimately death. By closely examining the lives of Esperanza, Fe, Caridad, and La Loca, I emphasize how Sofi is radicalized through her relationships with her children. Overall, my thesis illustrates how Sofi rebels against traditional maternal expectations of obedience and silence to protect and fight for the rights of her daughters. In this way, motherhood represents a path to liberation for Sofi, allowing her to move away from the oppressive, patriarchal, and capitalistic social structures that confront her as a Chicana woman.
    • Earth-Healing in South Africa: Challenges to the Church

      Denise Ackerman (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 1996-08-02)
    • Earthkeeping in the City

      Ede, Paul (Routledge, 2013-01-01)
      AbstractThe practice of brownfield rehabilitation for community use by a church in a context of urban poverty in Glasgow, Scotland is explored through action research to assess its capacity for practical and spiritual grassroots empowerment within the Pentecostal/charismatic tradition. The schema offered is one way of modelling a socially and environmentally engaged learning and empowerment cycle oriented towards creation care and the land, evidencing potential as (1) a missional approach with rich scope for connecting church, community and scripture in new ways, (2) a way of enabling young people in urban contexts to overcome nature-deficit disorder, (3) a tool for political empowerment or “avant-gardening” (Lam-bourne-Wilson), (4) insurgent planning from the margins (Sandercock), and (5) an example of Pentecostal conscientisation broadly affirming of Bridges Johns’ approach, but modulated contextually to serve the need for a Pentecostal/charismatic eco-theology.
    • Earthly Destruction: Catholic Social Teaching, War, and the Environment

      Cosacchi, Daniel (Loyola eCommons, 2016-01-01)
      For more than 1700 years in Christian theology, there has been a chasm between just war thinking and pacifism. Advocates of these two ideological positions have attempted to bridge this divide in a number of ways through the centuries. Some, such as Glen Stassen, have brought together thinkers on both sides of the divide to propose a just peacemaking theory. Others, such as Michael Schuck, Mark Allman, and Tobias Winright, have added new stages to just war thinking in order to make that existing tradition more robust. Some groups may identify as contingent pacifists. These would generally accept the criteria of the just war theory, but would not ever acknowledge violent force to be justified under certain conditions. This dissertation argues that, while it may not be possible to overcome the impasse between pacifists and adherents to just war thinking, it is possible for the two factions to work together for peace. One of the main areas in which this goal may be advanced is through common care and respect for the natural environment. In this study, the author examines the development of the Catholic social tradition on the topics of peace and ecology, including a careful reading of Pope Francis’s social encyclical, Laudato si’. The dissertation introduces a new type of contingent pacifism: ecological pacifism. Ecological pacifism argues against any type of violent intervention that will harm the earth, on the basis of earth’s sacredness as God’s creation. The dissertation maintains that both pacifism and just war thinking in Catholic social thought will be enhanced by this addition.