• Fabricated Nature: Where are the Boundaries?

      R.J. Berry; University College London (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2006-02-24)
      Problems associated with our use of technology have multiplied as the technologies themselves have become ever more powerful and particularly since we can now manipulate life itself. Genetical manipulation encapsulates for many the questions, fears and confusions raised by technological advances. The Prince of Wales’s criticisms of GM have been useful in crystallizing these. Some of the issues he has raised are due to misapprehension (such as the claim that the transfer of genes can only occur ‘naturally’ between organisms that interbreed; this is factually incorrect) but others highlight important topics about the relation between mankind and his environment. A persisting problem is that this relationship is distorted for us by the dominance of the Enlightenment enterprise that revealed so much about the natural world and its mechanisms. Crucially, this obscures the reality that we are more than mere apes—we are individuals created in God’s image—and that the apparently limitless opportunities that emerge from modern knowledge bring with them enormous responsibilities as well as enormous privileges—responsibilities to others, to our world, and to God. Lacking omniscience, we must accept the discipline of the ‘precautionary principle’ and the inter-dependence of scientific advance and social cohesion. We need wisdom as well as knowledge. In this respect, we can learn hugely from the history of the land which the Creator entrusted to humankind and the treatment of which is described in the older Testament. It teaches us about the limits of any one approach by itself—whether we espouse naturalism (or scientism), regulation, altruism or societal controls. Failure to look beyond ourselves and our own interests is likely to get us no further than an unstable modern version of the Tower of Babel.
    • Faces in the Trees

      David L. Haberman; Indiana University (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2010-07-11)
      Consideration of tree worship was once central to theories of religion, which tended to view this practice as a primitive form of anthropomorphic animism that has no place in a civilized modern world. How might we regard tree worship once it is liberated from the cultural evolutionary views of the nineteenth century? Neem trees have long been associated with the goddess Shitala in Hindu religious culture. This essay examines the worship of individual neem trees in northern India, which in some cases involves clothing the tree and attaching a human-like facemask to it. Ethnographic evidence suggests that this remarkable form of anthropomorphic activity can be best understood as an intentional strategy for establishing more intimate relationships with the nonhuman world. Although it is not the explicit goal of most tree worshipers in India, this practice may serve as a possible resource for the preservation of trees.
    • Facilitating Religious Environmentalism: Ethnology Plus Conservation Psychology Tools Can Assess an Interfaith Environmental Intervention1

      Brook, Amara; Shaw, Krista; Warner, Keith Douglass (2012)
      Reliance on a limited number of methodologies may be distorting scholarship in religious environmentalism. This article describes a religious environmental educational intervention, uses a qualitative ethnological approach to describe the response of local congregations to this intervention, and uses a quasi-experimental, quantitative psychological methodology to assess the impact of this intervention on the behavior of religious congregational leaders. This article reports the impact of the Living Ocean Initiative, a ten-month interfaith envi­ronmental outreach intervention that engaged forty-nine diverse religious congregations and their leaders in California 2006-2007. This study indicates the value of studying religious environmental interventions, and suggests that carefully designed interventions may be able to increase religious environmentalism. It found that religious leaders were more inclined to engage in personal pro-environmental behavior within their congregations than pro-environmental behavior in the political realm. This study reports expressions of religious environmentalism at the congregational scale. It suggests that the potential of religious environmentalism to transform environmental beliefs and politics proposed by scholars and religious leaders may be unrealistic, yet it does demonstrate impacts of an intervention on pro-environmental behavior, thus clarifying some of the ambiguity in past correlational studies, and suggesting that religious environmentalism can help foster a more sustainable society.
    • Facing east : a pilgrim's journey into the mysteries of Orthodoxy

      Mathewes-Green, Frederica (1952-) (HarperSanFrancisco, 1997)
    • Facing Ethical Issues: Dimensions of Character, Choices & Community

      McCormick, Patrick T. and Connors, Russell B. (2016-01-08)
    • Facing Ethical Issues: Dimensions of Character, Choices & Community

      McCormick, Patrick T. and Connors, Russell B. (2016-01-08)
    • Factors in the appeal of narrow drinking alleys in the heart of Tokyo

      Ohno, Ryuzo; Yoshida, Mayuko (2014)
      Investigations about the determinants of pro-ecological commitment have pointed out that religiosity differentiates between environmental caregivers and non-caregivers. The main objective of our study was to explore the association of religiosity and environmental care by followers of the three major religious orientations of the city of Natal, capital of a Northeastern Brazilian state. The investigation analysed the responses to a questionnaire by 84 participants: 31 Evangelicals, 25 Catholics, and 28 Spiritualists. The questions were presented either on a printed or online format; women totalled 60% of the participants, 83% of whom had completed at least the high school level of education . Participants were asked to attribute levels of influence (upon environmental care) to the following sources: contact with nature, school, family, friends, media and religion, to express their opinion about the role of religion for environmental care, and to evaluate their own religious engagement. Data from the open questions were treated by thematic content analysis and the frequencies were submitted to non-parametric statistical tests. Environmental caregivers were 57 participants (62%), and reported practices such as garbage management, plants maintenance, and water savings; besides, they attributed greater importance to contact with nature when compared to non-caregivers (p = 0?02). The proportion of caregivers and non-caregivers were similar for the three religious groups, however there were differences between them in regard to the perception of the influence of school, friends, media and religiosity (p < 0?05), while Catholics and Spiritualists presented higher means than Evangelists in all sources of influence. Reasons attributed to the influence of religiosity also varied among the three groups. Evangelists mentioned a strong sense of moral obligation to follow the doctrine, referring strongly to the Bible. Spiritualists alluded to spiritual improvement, which requires a conscious conduct by the individual, holistic vision and future perspective. Catholics focused on concrete actions promoted by religious institutions that may generate impact on the practices of environmental care. In general, results indicate the relevance of considering religiosity among the set of determinants of pro-ecological commitment, suggesting the need of additional investigations on how the diverse manifestations of spirituality may impact on environmental care.
    • Factors Influencing Diabetes Self-Management of Filipino Americans with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Holistic Approach

      Sonsona, Jocelyn B (ScholarWorks, 2014-01-01)
      There is an increasing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus among Filipino Americans. However, how well Filipino Americans with diabetes self-manage their disease and what factors influence their diabetes self-management behaviors remain unknown. Based on a holistic approach, this quantitative study was designed to investigate the diabetes self-management behaviors of this population and the factors influencing their self-management behaviors. The combined roles of diabetes knowledge, diabetes self-efficacy, spirituality, and social support were examined in predicting diabetes self-care behaviors. A convenience sample of 113 Filipino Americans with Type 2 diabetes mellitus completed the Diabetes Knowledge Test, Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Test, Daily Spiritual Experience Scale, Diabetes Social Support Questionnaire-Family Version, Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (Expanded), and a researcher-designed sociodemographic survey. A single samplet -test determined that the participants engaged well in diabetes self-management practices. Multiple regression analyses revealed self-efficacy, spirituality, and social support were predictive of diabetes self-management behaviors, even after controlling for the effect of the confounding variables (e.g., acculturation, socioeconomic status, health-related data, immigration status, education). Diabetes knowledge did not have a significant relationship to self-management. The implications for positive social change include the potential impact of educating clients with diabetes and their family members about the connections between self-efficacy, spirituality, and family social support in the self-management of diabetes. Furthermore, the use of a holistic approach by health professionals would improve diabetes self-management practices of Filipino American population with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.
    • Factors that determine the facilitation of stakeholders in environmental management – some philosophicalhistorical thoughts with the Merafong area as example

      E.S. van Eeden; I. Brink (Scriber Editorial Systems, 2007-07-01)
      In essence, the article covers some fundamental principles of stakeholdership within a democratic process of environmental management. An effort is also made to point out several historical features of stakeholdership within the Wonderfonteinspruit (WFS) Catchment in the Merafong study area. Both these facets in the discussion accentuate stakeholdership as being primary participants (especially organisations that are government directed) and secondary participants (especially non-governmental organisations) in which both groups can reflect sufficient historical evidence in this economic environment to identify them as either the injurers, the injured or the participants/interested parties. To meaningfully conclude the discussion of stakeholdership in environmental management, some international and philosophical models and perspectives were also utilised to obtain a broader holistic perspective of a meaningful long-term stakeholder partnership. These applications, as reflected against a less fruitful awareness of the environmental practices in the past, can be applied efficiently in future stakeholder discussions regarding the WFS area as part of an approach featuring environmental justice and environmental remediation, compensation and monitoring.
    • Factors that Shape Arab American College Student Identity

      Jaradat, Abdul Rahman F. (ScholarWorks@UMass Amherst, 2017-01-01)
      Arab American identity has not yet received the research attention and scholarship that it deserves. In this dissertation, I have qualitatively studied the narratives of young Arab American college students and recent graduates. The research questions that I explored include what makes them Arab Americans, and what are the factors that help them identify as such. By focusing on Arab Americans and their identity factors, I have presented the narratives of those women and men who self-identify as Arab American and quoted their accounts of how they navigate this undervalued, misunderstood, and stereotyped identity. I have used ethnic and racial identity models, such as Cross (1971) and Wijeyesinghe (1992, 2001, 2012) to note the factors that are salient in Arab American identity as described through in-depth interviews and focus groups with 11 Arab American young women and men. The dissertation concludes with a model that presents the factors that shaped Arab American identity for these subjects and the interrelationships among those factors.
    • Faith and charity : religion and humanitarian assistance in West Africa

      Audet-Gosselin, Louis; Gomez-Perez, Muriel; Madore, Frédérick; Savadogo Boukary, Mathias; Le Blanc, Marie-Nathalie; Watt, Steven R.; Couillard, Kathéry; Vitale, Mara; Koenig, Boris; Binaté, Issouf; et al. (Pluto Press, 2016)
    • Faith and Development in Focus: Bangladesh

      2018-11-13
      In development circles, Bangladesh is renowned for its robust civil society including some of the world’s largest and best known NGOs. The considerable development work of religious actors, however, is much less well known, although many have been intimately involved for centuries in humanitarian work and the provision of social services in their communities. "Faith and Development in Focus: Bangladesh" provides an accessible and thorough overview of the country’s surprisingly diverse faith landscape, tracing the history and contemporary landscape of major religious traditions and profiling key actors. The report explores the social dimensions of religious practice as well as ‘maps’ the contributions of faith-inspired organizations on critical development challenges. The underlying purpose is to provide a resource that can inform development policy and praxis in Bangladesh.
    • Faith and Development in Focus: Nigeria

      Marshall, Katherine (2018-09-27)
      Nigeria’s vibrant and dynamic religious landscape plays many roles in the nation’s life and development. It is also a factor, albeit a complex one, in conflicts and violence that many see as linked to religious divides. Religious institutions have deep historic roots and are unquestionably a vital part of communities at all levels. They have shaped Nigerian social and political approaches, notably in health and education, and play significant political and economic roles, both within Nigeria and internationally. Nigerians look to religious leaders for moral direction and practical support. Religious actors are significant for virtually every development challenge facing Nigeria, from governance structures to gender relations, regional balance to community resilience, and educational curricula to climate change. This report provides an overview of Nigeria’s religious landscape in relation to major development issues. Supported by the International Partnership on Religion and Sustainable Development (PaRD), the report is part of a broad effort to explore these questions in the context of five countries.
    • Faith and Development in Focus: Nigeria

      Marshall, Katherine (2018-09-27)
      Nigeria’s vibrant and dynamic religious landscape plays many roles in the nation’s life and development. It is also a factor, albeit a complex one, in conflicts and violence that many see as linked to religious divides. Religious institutions have deep historic roots and are unquestionably a vital part of communities at all levels. They have shaped Nigerian social and political approaches, notably in health and education, and play significant political and economic roles, both within Nigeria and internationally. Nigerians look to religious leaders for moral direction and practical support. Religious actors are significant for virtually every development challenge facing Nigeria, from governance structures to gender relations, regional balance to community resilience, and educational curricula to climate change. This report provides an overview of Nigeria’s religious landscape in relation to major development issues. Supported by the International Partnership on Religion and Sustainable Development (PaRD), the report is part of a broad effort to explore these questions in the context of five countries.
    • Faith and Development in Focus: Senegal

      Herzog, Lauren; Mui, Wilma Z. (2018-10-09)
      Senegal is often recognized for its unique religious landscape, notably marked by four main Sufi confréries (orders), and its long commitment to interfaith peace and dialogue. Senegal’s religious communities, which have widespread societal influence, have been the subject of much study, but the considerable work of religious actors (Muslim, Christian, and others) in the country is not as well known. “Faith and Development in Focus: Senegal” provides a comprehensive overview of the country’s religious landscape, highlighting its diversity, as well as historical realities and contemporary trends. It examines the influence of religion in Senegalese daily life and maps the contributions of faith-inspired actors to development, with a particular focus on key sectors for faith-inspired engagement. This report, part of the Religion and Development: Country-Level Mapping project conducted jointly by WFDD and the Berkley Center, aims to explore the changing religious landscape and the development activities of faith-inspired actors, thus contributing to a deeper understanding of religious-secular interactions.
 
 
 FRENCH DESCRIPTION: Le Sénégal est souvent reconnu pour son paysage religieux unique, marqué notamment par quatre grandes confréries soufies et son engagement à long terme pour la paix et le dialogue interreligieux. Les communautés religieuses du Sénégal, qui ont une grande influence sociale, ont fait l'objet de nombreuses études, mais le travail considérable des acteurs religieux (musulmans, chrétiens et d'autres) dans le pays n’est pas aussi bien connu. « Plein feux sur la foi et le développement : le Sénégal » donne un aperçu complet du paysage religieux du pays, en soulignant sa diversité, ainsi que les réalités historiques et les tendances contemporaines. Il examine l'influence de la religion sur la vie quotidienne et cartographie les contributions d’acteurs d’inspiration religieuse au développement, avec une emphase particulière sur les secteurs clés pour l'engagement d’inspiration religieuse. Ce rapport, qui fait partie du projet Religion and Development: Country Level Mapping mené par le WFDD et le Berkley Center, vise à explorer le paysage religieux en évolution et les activités de développement des acteurs d’inspiration religieuse, contribuant ainsi à une meilleure compréhension des interactions entre les domaines religieux et laïcs.
    • Faith and Development in Focus: Senegal

      2018-11-13
      Le Sénégal est souvent reconnu pour son paysage religieux unique, marqué notamment par quatre grandes confréries soufies et son engagement à long terme pour la paix et le dialogue interreligieux. Les communautés religieuses du Sénégal, qui ont une grande influence sociale, ont fait l'objet de nombreuses études, mais le travail considérable des acteurs religieux (musulmans, chrétiens et d'autres) dans le pays n’est pas aussi bien connu. « Plein feux sur la foi et le développement : le Sénégal » donne un aperçu complet du paysage religieux du pays, en soulignant sa diversité, ainsi que les réalités historiques et les tendances contemporaines. Il examine l'influence de la religion sur la vie quotidienne et cartographie les contributions d’acteurs d’inspiration religieuse au développement, avec une emphase particulière sur les secteurs clés pour l'engagement d’inspiration religieuse. Ce rapport, qui fait partie du projet Religion and Development: Country Level Mapping mené par le WFDD et le Berkley Center, vise à explorer le paysage religieux en évolution et les activités de développement des acteurs d’inspiration religieuse, contribuant ainsi à une meilleure compréhension des interactions entre les domaines religieux et laïcs.
    • Faith and Development in Focus: Senegal

      Herzog, Lauren; Mui, Wilma Z. (2018-10-09)
      Senegal is often recognized for its unique religious landscape, notably marked by four main Sufi confréries (orders), and its long commitment to interfaith peace and dialogue. Senegal’s religious communities, which have widespread societal influence, have been the subject of much study, but the considerable work of religious actors (Muslim, Christian, and others) in the country is not as well known. “Faith and Development in Focus: Senegal” provides a comprehensive overview of the country’s religious landscape, highlighting its diversity, as well as historical realities and contemporary trends. It examines the influence of religion in Senegalese daily life and maps the contributions of faith-inspired actors to development, with a particular focus on key sectors for faith-inspired engagement. This report, part of the Religion and Development: Country-Level Mapping project conducted jointly by WFDD and the Berkley Center, aims to explore the changing religious landscape and the development activities of faith-inspired actors, thus contributing to a deeper understanding of religious-secular interactions.
 
 
 FRENCH DESCRIPTION: Le Sénégal est souvent reconnu pour son paysage religieux unique, marqué notamment par quatre grandes confréries soufies et son engagement à long terme pour la paix et le dialogue interreligieux. Les communautés religieuses du Sénégal, qui ont une grande influence sociale, ont fait l'objet de nombreuses études, mais le travail considérable des acteurs religieux (musulmans, chrétiens et d'autres) dans le pays n’est pas aussi bien connu. « Plein feux sur la foi et le développement : le Sénégal » donne un aperçu complet du paysage religieux du pays, en soulignant sa diversité, ainsi que les réalités historiques et les tendances contemporaines. Il examine l'influence de la religion sur la vie quotidienne et cartographie les contributions d’acteurs d’inspiration religieuse au développement, avec une emphase particulière sur les secteurs clés pour l'engagement d’inspiration religieuse. Ce rapport, qui fait partie du projet Religion and Development: Country Level Mapping mené par le WFDD et le Berkley Center, vise à explorer le paysage religieux en évolution et les activités de développement des acteurs d’inspiration religieuse, contribuant ainsi à une meilleure compréhension des interactions entre les domaines religieux et laïcs.
    • Faith in a Changing Planet: The Role of Religious Leaders in the Fight for a Livable Climate

      Zuckerman, Morissa (Scholarship @ Claremont, 2016-01-01)
      Progressive religious leaders are playing an increasingly important role in the effort to combat climate change. Through a combination of unstructured in-depth interviews and primary source analysis, this thesis highlights nine U.S. religious leaders from various denominations of Christianity, Judaism and Islam who are actively involved in working on climate issues. Drawing on literature in social movement theory, I explore how clergy are uniquely influential in climate issues because of the organizational advantage and moral authority they hold through their positions as religious leaders, granting them the ability to highlight social justice implications of climate change with distinctive legitimacy. Clergy engage in climate issues through a number of tactics and myriad activities spanning three domains: their congregations, the climate movement, and policy circles. While religious leaders are imbued with moral authority that allows them to speak powerfully on the social justice implications of climate change, they are also limited in a number of ways precisely because they are working within a religious context.
    • Faith in Development : Partnership between the World Bank and the Churches of Africa

      Sugden, Chris; Belshaw, Deryke; Calderisi, Robert; Sugden, Chris; Belshaw, Deryke; Calderisi, Robert (Irvine, CA: Regnum Books International and the World Bank, 2013-06-19)
      Most of Africa's poor are deeply religious. Not only are faith communities among the poor, in many cases they are the poor. Like other faith communities, the Christian Church in Africa has grown impressively. Its development role must be taken seriously, not just because it is trusted and broad-based within Africa, but also because it is a part of a global movement capable of improving the lives of the poor. The papers in this report were presented at the Churches of Africa/World Bank Conference on Alleviating Poverty in Africa, which was held in Nairobi, Kenya, in March 2000. Representatives of African churches came together with senior staff at the World Bank for discussions on a topic of mutual and urgent concern: alleviating poverty in Africa. Participants at the conference expressed a wide range of viewpoints, including treating people as subjects rather than objects, promoting investment and industrialization through human capital formation, listening to the "voices of the poor," recapturing lost market shares in promary commodity markets, the ideal patterns of church development practice, gender inequality, enterprise solutions for addressing poverty, and the church's role in promoting social justice and as well as income generation and service delivery.