• Gandhi's Spirituality in Today's Ecological Crisis

      Simon Mason (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 1998-08-02)
      We are sitting in an enormous cathedral. Light is shining in, there is much light. From high up in the middle of the cathedral a green leaf floats down, slowly, slowly floating down. If carbon dioxide emissions were maintained at today’s levels (an optimistic assumption), they would lead to a nearly constant rate of increase in atmospheric concentrations for at least two centuries, reaching about 500 ppmv (approaching twice the pre-industrial concentration) by the end of the 21st century . . . the increase in global average surface temperature at equilibrium resulting from a doubling of CO2 would be likely to be between 1.5 and 4.5 ºC (IPCC).
    • Gawain and the nonexistent knight

      Bernatchez, Joshua (2007)
      This thesis examines Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Italo Calvino's The Nonexistent Knight as texts in which the protagonists are engaged on unique quests that force them to choose either physical dissolution or the dissolution of their sense of personal significance. The impossible decision suggests that human life and the significant "self' as a constructed idea are inextricably linked and of comparable value but may have contradictory survival conditions. Contextualized with reference to Charles Taylor, "selfhood" is necessarily linked to moral "horizons" against which such concepts become meaningful. The protagonists of the literary texts in question justifiably manifest a desire for their systems of self-interpretation to be stable and transcendent. However, such identity-conferring systems are problematic because they are subject to inherent indeterminacy and fluctuation. Consequently, the characters in both texts are forced to recognize the inaccessibility of perfectly stable meaning and the need for paradigms to be adaptable. Calvino's text dramatizes the importance of the paradigm personified by the nonexistent knight Agilulf. The model he represents, despite his inevitable dissolution, provides intelligible form to an otherwise empirically real but meaningless existence feared by the other characters and embodied by his squire Gurduloo. Similarly, Gawain is ultimately faced with the need to interpret the significance of his life in relative terms due to his inevitable inability to make his infallible chivalric reputation and his finite human character coincide. The texts, together, situate any surviving rational agency within the interpretative capacity for dealing with inherent paradox.
    • Gawain de Harrison Birtwistle : un opéra (extra-) national ? Gawain by Harrison Birtwistle: an opera with (extra-) national features?

      Jean-Philippe Héberlé (Maison de la Recherche en Sciences Humaines, 2009-10-01)
      This article deals with Harrison Birtwistle’s opera Gawain (1991). Written on a libretto by the English poet, David Harsent, Gawain is characterized both by national and extra-national elements. The most obvious national features are to be found in the subject of the opera based on the famous English medieval epic poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. They are also displayed in the references to Shakespeare, to other British composers (Michael Tippett and Henry Purcell for instance) and to typical English musical or musico-dramatic forms such as the masque. As far as the foreign borrowings or influences are concerned, Harrison Birtwistle’s debt to composers like Richard Wagner, Igor Stravinsky and Olivier Messiaen is once more displayed in Gawain. Other influences are shown through his translation into music of aesthetic ideas inspired by the great German painter Paul Klee and through his adaptation of elements taken from Greek tragedy. One can thus wonder if this fusion or juxtaposition of vernacular and foreign elements is not one of the key features of Gawain.
    • Gebet und meditative Elemente im Religionsunterricht der Sekundarstufe II

      Edlinger, Marietta (2016)
      Die vorliegende Diplomarbeit behandelt die Forschungsfrage welche Bedeutung und welchen Stellenwert Gebete und meditative Elemente im Religionsunterricht der Sekundarstufe II einnehmen. Dies erfolgt gleichermaßen in Hinblick auf die gängige Praxis an öffentlichen Schulen sowie in Anbetracht möglicher Einwände von Seiten des Staates und der Gesellschaft.
 Nach der Einleitung wird im dritten Kapitel die Lebenswelt der SchülerInnen, anhand von Milieustudien, beschrieben und hervorgehoben, welche Auswirkungen die gewandelten Lebensbedingungen und sozialen Strukturen auf den Werdegang der heutigen Jugendlichen haben. Des Weiteren wird auf die Bereiche Religion und Religiosität, in Hinblick auf die Heranwachsenden und besonders auf die Gebetspraxis dieser, eingegangen. Zusätzlich wird ein Einblick in die Bedeutung des Religionsunterrichts an der öffentlichen Schule gegeben.
 Der Hauptteil der Arbeit gliedert sich in verschiedene Unterpunkte und setzt sich mit diversen Aspekten der Thematik Gebet und meditativen Elementen auseinander, wobei zu Beginn eine theologische Reflexion dieser Begriffe erfolgt. Anschließend werden Vorkenntnisse, die für das Beten erforderlich sind, sowie die Charakteristika des Gebets behandelt. Dieser Abschnitt beinhaltet Darstellungen von diversen Gebetsformen, haltungen und -inhalten. Zum Abschluss dieses Kapitels werden die Praktiken Meditation, Stilleübungen und Phantasiereisen genauer beschrieben.
 Die Erkenntnisse der vorhergehenden Kapitel werden schließlich mit dem Bereich der Schule in Verbindung gebracht und es wird hervorgehoben welchen Stellenwert meditative Übungen hier einnehmen, wo sie im Lehrplan der Oberstufe verankert sind und welche Rolle der Spiritualität von ReligionslehrerInnen zukommt. Ausgehend von möglichen Vorerfahrungen der jungen Erwachsenen werden anschließend mögliche Hindernisse, sowie Hilfestellungen bezüglich der Gebetspraxis, dargestellt.
 Das sechste Kapitel fasst die Beobachtungen zusammen und gibt einen möglichen Antwortversuch, wie wertvoll Gebete und meditative Elemente für den Religionsunterricht der Sekundarstufe II sind und welche Bedeutung sie für das Leben der SchülerInnen, das Schulklima sowie die Gesellschaft haben können.
    • Geloven wij in globalisering? : gesprekshandleiding voor gemeente en parochie

      Stichting Oikos; Doelman-de Graaf, C.M. (Stichting Oikos, Utrecht, 2005)
      A discussion manual for church communities and parishes, which can be used for discussing globalization and sustainability. Attention is paid to the Millennium Development Goals and there is a special section on liturgy and globalization.
    • Gender and Ecofeminism: Religious Reflections on a Case Study in Soc Son, Vietnam

      Anne Marie Dalton; Saint Mary’s University (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2006-12-26)
      In this article I explore the implications of feminist and gender approaches for development for ecofeminism, especially religious ecofeminism. I base my discussion primarily on my experience of conducting gender analysis for a development project in China and Vietnam.1 My purpose is to explore the religious questions that were raised for me in this concrete (and not explicitly religious) context. I conclude (1) that religious ecofeminism can gain insight from the concrete data supplied by gender analysis; attention to the actual day to day roles of men and women not only tests accepted theories but also raises new concerns and challenges that must be taken seriously within the ecofeminist agenda, and (2) that the concrete data of my experience suggest that a religious ecofeminism relevant to the poor of the developing world (or perhaps poor anywhere) must focus primarily on an agenda for the so-called developed world.
    • Gender and education define why diaconal employees fail to implement Lutheran Church environmental policy

      Torset, Anniken (Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, 2013-07-09)
      Why does the Church Care for the Environment? Value Orientation Among the ELCN’s Diaconal Employees: Abstract: In 2007, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Norway (ELCN) included environmental stewardship in its definition of diakonia. In the ELCN’s national plan for the diaconal ministry, it emphasizes nature’s intrinsic value, and highlighs that stewardship is a biospheric commission. Neither before nor after ELCN’s new definition and plan of diakonia was established, has research examined value
 orientation among local diaconal employees. Using a survey based upon the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) and Schwartz value scale, information on value
 orientation from 115 deacons, deacon workers, and deacon advisors was gathered. Because the Schwartz scale does not measure local value orientation, additional data from another survey designed for Paper II in this thesis was used. A majority of the survey respondents held an altruistic, rather than biospheric, value orientation,
 indicating that ELCN biospheric policy has low support among local diaconal employees. Correlations with demographic factors were considered, but varied too much to fully explain value orientation. Why Diaconal Employees Are Not Motivated to Walk the Talk of Stewardship: Abstract: In 2007, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Norway (ELCN) officially changed from a social altruistic to a biospheric value orientation, when including environmental protection as part of its diaconal ministry. Despite ELCN’s official change, results from Paper I suggest that diaconal employees still maintain altruistic value orientation. To explain why diaconal employees have not adapted ELCN’s biospheric value orientation, a combined quantitative and qualitative approach was used. Two online surveys were sent to all ELCN diaconal employees. In addition, study leaders at the master programs in diakonia were interviewed. Data were
 gathered on diaconal employees’ knowledge, attitude, and practice correlated with environmental protection and stewardship. Gender and education were the core variables explaining environmental attitude and value orientation. Pro-environmental affective attitude was positively correlated with men and higher education. Proenvironmental cognitive attitude was positively correlated with men, higher education, and older age. Pro-environmental conative attitude and behavior correlated positively with men, higher education, young age, and working in urban or semiurban areas.
    • Gender and education define why diaconal employees fail to implement Lutheran Church environmental policy

      Torset, Anniken (Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, 2013-07-09)
      Why does the Church Care for the Environment? Value Orientation Among the ELCN’s Diaconal Employees: Abstract: In 2007, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Norway (ELCN) included environmental stewardship in its definition of diakonia. In the ELCN’s national plan for the diaconal ministry, it emphasizes nature’s intrinsic value, and highlighs that stewardship is a biospheric commission. Neither before nor after ELCN’s new definition and plan of diakonia was established, has research examined value
 orientation among local diaconal employees. Using a survey based upon the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) and Schwartz value scale, information on value
 orientation from 115 deacons, deacon workers, and deacon advisors was gathered. Because the Schwartz scale does not measure local value orientation, additional data from another survey designed for Paper II in this thesis was used. A majority of the survey respondents held an altruistic, rather than biospheric, value orientation,
 indicating that ELCN biospheric policy has low support among local diaconal employees. Correlations with demographic factors were considered, but varied too much to fully explain value orientation. Why Diaconal Employees Are Not Motivated to Walk the Talk of Stewardship: Abstract: In 2007, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Norway (ELCN) officially changed from a social altruistic to a biospheric value orientation, when including environmental protection as part of its diaconal ministry. Despite ELCN’s official change, results from Paper I suggest that diaconal employees still maintain altruistic value orientation. To explain why diaconal employees have not adapted ELCN’s biospheric value orientation, a combined quantitative and qualitative approach was used. Two online surveys were sent to all ELCN diaconal employees. In addition, study leaders at the master programs in diakonia were interviewed. Data were
 gathered on diaconal employees’ knowledge, attitude, and practice correlated with environmental protection and stewardship. Gender and education were the core variables explaining environmental attitude and value orientation. Pro-environmental affective attitude was positively correlated with men and higher education. Proenvironmental cognitive attitude was positively correlated with men, higher education, and older age. Pro-environmental conative attitude and behavior correlated positively with men, higher education, young age, and working in urban or semiurban areas.
    • Gender and the Greening of Buddhism : Exploring Scope for a Buddhist Ecofeminism in an Ultramodern Age

      Tomalin, Emma (1969-)
      Despite its popularity and appeal for many, ecofeminism has been criticized for essentializing and romanticizing women's roles as close to nature, thereby reproducing colonialist and biologically determinist discourses that contribute to discrimination. In response there have been attempts to defend ecofeminism, arguing that such critiques are hyperbolic and that we need ecofeminism more than ever (Philips and Rumens 2016). In a climate of renewed interest in ecofeminism, I ask why is it that some faith traditions are represented to a far greater extent in ecofeminist literature than others? I pick up on this discrepancy within ecofeminism's engagement between different religions through examining Buddhist responses to gender and ecology. In the article I adopt a theory of ultramodern Buddhism, developed by Halafoff and Rajkobal (2015), to understand Buddhism in the contemporary era. Three main research questions are addressed: (1) to what extent has green Buddhism' been gendered?; (2) why has there has been virtually no attempt to bring together feminist analysis with responses to Buddhism and environmentalism? Why have they been approached separately?; and (3) in what ways are Buddhist women (and men) combining gender analysis and environmentalism in practice in reference to or outside the framework of ecofeminism? To better understand why a Buddhist ecofeminism has not been named and claimed by Buddhists in either the West or Asia, there is a need for local-level empirical studies that examine subjective understandings of relationships between gender and environmentalism in the lives of ultramodern Buddhist practitioners rather than assuming a standard ecofeminist position as the primary reference point.
    • Gender issues in agricultural and rural development policy in Asia and the Pacific

      Stephens, A.; RAPA (Bangkok (Thailand), 1995)
      Job number added acc. to DOCREP assignment
    • Gender, Religion and the Environment: A University of the Western Cape Case Study

      Ernst Conradie; University of the Western Cape; Julia Martin; University of the Western Cape (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2006-12-26)
      This contribution explores the relationship between gender, religion and the environment in terms of the perceptions of a group of first-year students registered for a course on Environmental Awareness Techniques and Training at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa. The empirical investigation indicates that there is a surprisingly high level of environmental awareness amongst this group, possibly reflecting their different living conditions, but that they were unable to recognize connections between their environmental commitment, their religious affiliation and gender consciousness.