• Hacer Ecoteología [Do theology ]

      Hedstróm, Ingemar (DEI (Departamento Ecuménico de Investigaciones), 1982-02)
      "¿Cuál es el propósito de tratar la problemática ecológica en el Departamento Ecuménico de Investigaciones? ¿Por qué estamos interesados en el medio ambiente natural? Al respecto hay varias formas de explicar esto. Una puede ser desde un punto de vista puramente técnico. Mientras que otra puede tener un contenido mas ideológico-político, y hasta religioso. Trataré en lo que sigue de aunar estos dos enfoques."
    • Hacia una comprensión de la conversión ecológica

      Mauricio Rincón Andrade (Universidad de San Buenaventura, 2018-04-01)
      The encyclical Laudato si’ of Pope Francis has become one of the most broadcasted and commented documents of the Social Doctrine of the Church. Fundamentally because it is a critical and rigorous approach to the socio-environmental crisis that we are going through and, moreover, because it is not only in analysis but also because it offers some lines of action based on the rich tradition of the Church and Of Christian spirituality. Within the different alternatives offered by the South American pope in his writing, in this article we are going to propose an approach to a specific one: the «ecological conversion». Mainly because it is a call to opt for another lifestyle and to change structures that govern our society.
    • Hacia una ecología integral [Towards a comprehensive ecology]

      Lamet, Pedro Miguel (Asociacion Iglesia Viva, 1990)
      "Dos viajes papales se han producido en los últimos meses, que nuestros lectores habrán sin duda seguido a través de los diversos medios informativos. Ambos merecen una reflexión nueva, puesto que, junto al esquema repetido de las giras pastorales de Juan Pablo II, se realizan en un momento distinto: después de la caída del muro de Berlín y del estallido de la perestroika" ["Two papal trips have occurred in recent months, our readers will certainly followed through the various media. Both I deserve a new reflection, since, by the repeated scheme pastoral tours of John Paul II, is made at a different time: after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the outbreak of perestroika"]
    • Haiti's Troubles: Perspectives From the Theology of Work and From Liberation Theology

      Florival, Lys Stéphane (Loyola eCommons, 2011-05-25)
      This dissertation examines "signs of the times" in contemporary Haiti, concentrating on the harsh realities of work and workers in the context of entrenched poverty and ecological devastation. It seeks to formulate a Christian theological-ethical framework that will empower movements of both the Church and Haitian society to engage the problems of the degradation of work and exploitation of workers. This investigation adopts the critical method of correlation using insights from certain modern theologies of work (Chenu, John Paul II, and Miroslav Volf) and from liberation theology (Gutiérrez, Godefroy Midy, and J-B Aristide) to analyze key features of the realities of work and poverty in Haiti. This study shows that (i) a detailed and realistic analysis of the key features of work and poverty in Haiti suggests that the theological reflection on work and liberation theology must be made more adequate to the real challenges of poor peoples in the twenty-first century; and (ii) the theology of work and liberation theology need to be informed by both ecological understanding and economic development strategies. This dissertation concludes by arguing that the case of Haiti highlights both how theological understanding of human liberation requires ecologically-sensitive sustainable development and also how Catholic and Protestant traditions of reflection about human work need to be broadened to understand work and labor in an explicitly ecological frame.
    • Haiti's Troubles: Perspectives From the Theology of Work and From Liberation Theology

      Florival, Lys Stéphane (Loyola eCommons, 2011-05-25)
      This dissertation examines "signs of the times" in contemporary Haiti, concentrating on the harsh realities of work and workers in the context of entrenched poverty and ecological devastation. It seeks to formulate a Christian theological-ethical framework that will empower movements of both the Church and Haitian society to engage the problems of the degradation of work and exploitation of workers. This investigation adopts the critical method of correlation using insights from certain modern theologies of work (Chenu, John Paul II, and Miroslav Volf) and from liberation theology (Gutiérrez, Godefroy Midy, and J-B Aristide) to analyze key features of the realities of work and poverty in Haiti. This study shows that (i) a detailed and realistic analysis of the key features of work and poverty in Haiti suggests that the theological reflection on work and liberation theology must be made more adequate to the real challenges of poor peoples in the twenty-first century; and (ii) the theology of work and liberation theology need to be informed by both ecological understanding and economic development strategies. This dissertation concludes by arguing that the case of Haiti highlights both how theological understanding of human liberation requires ecologically-sensitive sustainable development and also how Catholic and Protestant traditions of reflection about human work need to be broadened to understand work and labor in an explicitly ecological frame.
    • Halakhah and Climate Change

      Sinclair, Julian (2016-01-08)
    • Hamartology and ecology: a critical assessment of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s view on the nature of sin

      Conradie, E.M; Cloete, Newton Millan (2014-06-09)
      Contemporary ecological concerns are addressed in a wide range of disciplines, including Christian theology. This task is addressed especially in Christian ecotheology which may be approached from within all the traditional theological sub-disciplines. This research project will contribute to discourse in Christian systematic theology where various aspects of the Christian faith are revisited in the light of ecological concerns. One such aspect is the Christian doctrine of sin (hamartology) with specific reference to an understanding of the nature of sin. In ecotheology sin is re-described in various innovative ways, for example in terms of anthropocentrism, domination in the name of differences of species, consumerist greed and the alienation of humans from the earth community. This project will investigate, more specifically, the contribution made by Dietrich Bonhoeffer to a Christian understanding of the nature of sin. The question that will be addressed here is how Bonhoeffer‟s positionmay be assessed in the light of contemporary Christian discourse on hamartology and ecology.
    • Happy School by the Sea

      MacNutt, J. Scott (Digital Commons @ Salve Regina, 1983-01-01)
      When, in 1895, a boys' school was established at Newport by Oliver Whipple Huntington, Ph.D., and Leslie Green, M.A., they adopted the title of the seat of Bishop George Berkeley and called it Cloyne House School. It was to be a college preparatory school under Episcopal Church auspices, with an enrollment limited to fifty. The school flourished for twenty-two years. "Happy" seems a proper epithet for Cloyne. The time, the place, and the people - boys and teachers - may well be described by that word. The country was prosperous and untroubled, with no forebodings of a worldwide war. Newport and the Bay offered unspoiled beautiful and historically significant features.
    • Harnessing the power of religion : broadening sustainability research and practice in the advancement of ecology

      El-Jurdi, Hounaida; Batat, Wided; Jafari, Aliakbar (2016-09-04)
      Sustainability research in the macromarketing literature has been largely limited to exploring sociocultural values and norms, business practices, public policies, and economic conditions. Although the concept of ‘values’ constantly recurs in the literature, religious perspectives have received little attention. By presenting an alternative interpretation of what have traditionally been construed as anthropocentric religions, this study highlights the underutilized potential of religions as effective vehicles for initiating cultural transformation towards sustainability. The article calls for contextualized approaches to ecological sustainability that take into account the values and worldviews of target communities, which are often shaped by religious systems. The article concludes that including religions in the sustainability discourse can benefit macromarketing theory and practice in a variety of ways.
    • Harry Paul interview

      Dobbin, Murray; Paul, Harry (Canadian Plains Research Centre, 2009-02-05)
      Other
    • Harry Paul interview

      Dobbin, Murray; Paul, Harry (Canadian Plains Research Centre, 1976-07-14)
      Other
    • Has Ecofeminism Cornered the Market? Gender Analysis in the Study of Religion, Nature, and Culture

      Tovis Page; Harvard University (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2008-01-25)
      An evaluation of how and to what extent gender has been used as a category of analysis in the study of religion and nature to date highlights important extant areas of work, as well as new approaches and subjects of inquiry that are as yet relatively untapped. The academic study of religion and nature has attended to ecofeminist concerns from the earliest stages of its development as a field, which testifies to its commitment to be a critical, interdisciplinary, and inclusive body of scholarship. But several unfortunate consequences result from the near-exclusive focus on ecofeminism within the field thus far, consequences that stem not from ecofeminism per se, but from the elision and underdevelopment of other productive forms of gender analysis that promise to further enrich the growing field of religion, nature, and culture studies.
    • Hazel Green, Kentucky, First Presbyterian Church session book

      Hazel Green First Presbyterian Church (Ky.) (University of Kentucky, 1882-1901)
      1 reel of microfilm (5 ft.)
    • Healing Our People ... Our Planet

      Catholic Healthcare West, 2016-01-08
    • Healing the Earth: An Australian Christian Reflection on the Renewal of Creation

      Uniting Church in Australia. Assembly Social Responsibility & Justice Committee, 2016-01-08
    • Health Care in the Age of Ecology

      Hite, Roger W. (2016-01-09)
    • "Hear you, mountains, the RIB of the LORD": Rereading the Role/s of Creation in the so-called Lawsuit of God in Micah 6:1-8 in Light of Contemporary Ecological Crisis

      Ibita, Maricel; U0056600 (2009)
      Recently, a proposal for an ecological hermeneutic that “operate[s] between recovery and resistance with an approach that may be labelled ‘revision’, ‘reformation’ or ‘reconfiguration’” has been made . It suggests that the six ecojustice principles of the Earth Bible Project – intrinsic worth, interconnectedness, voice, purpose, mutual custodianship and resistance – be employed as “heuristic keys” or “small dogmatics” on creation, inclusive ecclesiology, anthropology, eschatology, doctrine of providence and ecological ethics, and as an alternative doctrine of sin to help root in, connect with, and critique biblical interpretation in the Christian tradition vis-à-vis the ecological crisis. This proposition will be applied in rereading the presence and absence of natural elements functioning as judge, witness or part of the jury, and the role of the other members of creation in the so-called rîb-pattern or legal metaphor in the Hebrew Bible. Particularly, this paper will delve on the role of the natural elements in the making, breaking, keeping and renewal of the covenant with God in Micah 6:1-8. It aims to help raise the readers’ awareness of creation’s presence and voice in biblical texts which condemns the breaking of the covenant, highlights endeavours for reconciliation, and celebrates a renewed covenant through fullness of life for all life forms.