• I BELIEVE IN THE HOLY EARTHY CHURCH: TOWARD AN ECOLOGICAL REINTERPRETATION OF THE HOLINESS OF THE CHURCH

      David N. Field (Stellenbosch University, 2013-06-01)
      <p>This article develops a re-interpretation of the holiness of the church. It comprises two main sections. The first re-examines the motif of holiness by critically examining use of this motif in selected biblical traditions. This will form the basis for the development of an ecological understanding of holiness. The second part will examine what on earth it means to confess that the church is ecologically holy given, its all too obvious failures and the pervasive influence of the socio-cultural and politico-economic forces that are destructive to the earth.</p><p> </p><p>doi: 10.7833/111-1-20</p>
    • "I Don't Want to Limit Myself to Binary Thinking": An Interview With the Indonesian Artist Arahmaiani

      Gunnar Stange (SEAS - Society for South-East Asian Studies, 2017-06-01)
      Arahmaiani is one of the best known contemporary Indonesian women artists. Her works, performances, and installations have been exhibited at 7 biennials and in a total of 29 countries. She has taught at universities in Australia, China, Indonesia, Germany, the United States, and the Netherlands. Arahmaiani is a politically committed artist. In her works, she addresses the reduction of human beings to consumers, which is on the rise all over the globe, as well as the discrimination against people on the grounds of gender, religion, and ethnicity. While the phenomena addressed in her art are always of a global nature, the majority of her works deal with cultural, social, and political realities of Indonesia. She views these as being threatened by an increasing politicization and essentialization of Islam, whose protagonists supplant the country’s diverse ethnic, linguistic, and religious heritage with a purely Islamic interpretation of the Indonesian past. In this interview, conducted by Gunnar Stange in December 2016, Arahmaiani elaborates on the main themes she addresses in her art works as well as on current political, social, and environmental challenges in Indonesia.
    • “I Don’t Want to Limit Myself to Binary Thinking”: an Interview With the Indonesian Artist Arahmaiani

      Stange, Gunnar (AUT, 2019-06-03)
      Arahmaiani is one of the best known contemporary Indonesian women artists. Her works, performances, and installations have been exhibited at 7 biennials and in a total of 29 countries. She has taught at universities in Australia, China, Indonesia, Germany, the United States, and the Netherlands. Arahmaiani is a politically committed artist. In her works, she addresses the reduction of human beings to consumers, which is on the rise all over the globe, as well as the discrimination against people on the grounds of gender, religion, and ethnicity. While the phenomena addressed in her art are always of a global nature, the majority of her works deal with cultural, social, and political realities of Indonesia. She views these as being threatened by an increasing politicization and essentialization of Islam, whose protagonists supplant the country’s diverse ethnic, linguistic, and religious heritage with a purely Islamic interpretation of the Indonesian past. In this interview, conducted by Gunnar Stange in December 2016, Arahmaiani elaborates on the main themes she addresses in her art works as well as on current political, social, and environmental challenges in Indonesia.
    • I See You: Interspecies Empathy and 'Avatar'

      Lisa Hatton Sideris; Religious Studies, Indiana University (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2011-01-01)
      I explore empathic dimensions of James Cameron’s film Avatar’s central metaphor of seeing others, and the uses of empathy and empathic bonding throughout the film, both between humans and the Na’vi, and between the Na’vi and the animals that inhabit their world. Empathy entails an ability to see and feel the world from another’s perspective—feeling with rather than feeling for. Jake Sully’s identity as shifting, and boundary-crossing, makes him an especially good candidate for empathic cultivation. Sully assumes an avatar identity, stepping into a Na’vi form but also trying on a range of different perspectives, as part of his education in empathy and his spiritual transformation. The film sheds light on the complexity, fragility, and dangers of empathy, as well as its potential as an environmental and humanitarian value. Avatar suggests empathy’s perils, but also illustrates that empathy, properly oriented and cultivated, is an important environmental disposition encouraging appreciation of otherness.
    • Ice skating near Greenmanville Avenue, houses and Seventh Day Baptist Church in view.

      Newbury, Edward H., 1867-1960. ([between 1)
      Children and adults ice skate in an area that is now the south parking lot of Mystic Seaport. A man helps a boy with his skates in the foreground. A girl stands to the right looking toward the camera. Houses and the Seventh Day Baptist Church on Greenmanville Avenue can be seen to the left and in the background.<br>
    • Iconicity and the Liturgical Experience of Nature: A Hermeneutical-Ethical Appraisal

      Van den Noortgaete, Francis; U0086195 (2015-07-25)
      Environmental hermeneutics forms an emerging field within environmental philosophy, studying the human understanding of environments and how these are mediated in perceptual and moral experience . Because of its particular attention to meaning and identity, it can also provide a novel perspective on environmental ethics. Van Tongeren argues for a “hermeneutics of environmental ethical experience” , which appears quite distinct from consequentialist, deontological or virtue approaches. Research in environmental and eco-psychology reveals hermeneutical processes operative in the construction of environmental identity . Drawing on the growing array of empirical research, it becomes clear that an affect-based nature experience can foster a relationality to the natural world that is transformative to one’s concept of self, and this through marked hermeneutical processes . Moreover, such a “connectedness to nature,” internalized and integrated in one’s identity structure, appears to be strongly predictive of pro-environmental behaviour, reducing the so-called “value-action gap” . These findings are highly relevant to ethics, especially so in the face of considerable environmental challenges to be met. Drawing on both the (predominantly Orthodox) Christian theology of the icon and on the phenomenology of the icon in the work of Jean-Luc Marion and Bruce V. Foltz , the notion of the iconicity of nature (“nature as iconic”) is found to be particularly apt to describe a certain type of encounter with(in) the natural world, in which the human, the (non-human) natural and the spiritual-divine are experienced as a form of communion-in-alterity, exerting a call on the human being to participate. Based on the work of Marion, it becomes clear that hermeneutics is essential to the icon (as a saturated phenomenon), allowing the natural world to manifest itself in its full particularity. Iconicity is also found to tally well with features found in empirical studies on spiritual forms of nature experience, providing an interesting framework to articulate the marked paradoxical elements within such experiences . However, in Eastern Christianity, the icon cannot be considered apart from a “liturgical” setting. Drawing on the notion of the liturgy in Jean-Yves Lacoste enables one to describe what can be called a “liturgical experience of nature,” wherein there is no longer “subject” nor “object,” offering a pure instance of existence as co-existence with clear ethical implications. In this paper, first a brief outline will be given of what the iconic-liturgical, as applied to nature (experience), actually consists of. Subsequently, I will focus on the specific hermeneutics which appears to be essential to it. Finally I will establish in what manner this iconic-liturgical approach can contribute to a “hermeneutics of environmental ethical experience,” in particular by helping to articulate the structure and characteristics of certain experiences of nature , which exhibit a potential to be conducive to lasting pro-environmental behaviour.
    • ICT for Development : Contributing to the Millennium Development Goals - Lessons Learned from Seventeen infoDev Projects

      Peirce, Malcolm; Evangelista, Soc; Sugden, Susan; Webb, Mike; Batchelor, Simon; Hearn, Simon (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2013-08-06)
      The aim of this paper is to create a publicly available resource that provides concise descriptions of selected infoDev ICT-for-development projects, and their impact on poverty. The paper first presents case studies of a cross-section of projects funded by the infoDev Core Program, followed by an in-depth analysis of the impact, and limits of those projects. The main criterion for selecting projects for case study analysis was to be as representative as possible of the various environments (political, economic, social, geographic) in which infoDev has been operating since its inception. An attempt was also made to provide a balanced sample relative to the success rate of the projects. Rather than selecting the "best projects," the authors, in consultation with the task managers of the projects, gave priority to those initiatives likely to offer the best lessons and knowledge about how to use ICT for development purposes. infoDev case studies show that the presence of a project champion enhances the success of a project (FOOD, Manobi, Voxiva, Fantsuam). The cases also demonstrate that technical and organization capacity can be built over the life of a project.
    • Identifying and Working with Beneficiaries When Rights Are Unclear : Insights for REDD+ Initiatives

      Nielsen, Robin; Bruce, John (Program on Forests (PROFOR), Washington, DC, 2013-03-11)
      Expert statements indicate that annually approximately 20 billion dollars will be needed to prevent 90 percent deforestation in tropical countries. Development practitioners are eager to see the benefits from REDD plus initiatives shared with local partners. Equally important to understanding how local partners might benefit are questions such as, who should derive benefits from REDD plus initiatives, and how to ensure these initiatives reach the affected households, individuals, communities, companies, and government units. Getting benefit-sharing rights is fundamental, as it will determine how REDD plus initiatives serve a broader development agenda and prevent them from centralizing decision making and enabling elite capture. This paper examines how to address this challenge by adopting a legal pluralism framework and discussing the potential role of legal instruments such as contracts. While the analysis focuses largely on REDD plus activities that involve land, forests, and carbon sequestration, many of the principles suggested are applicable in a broad sense to REDD plus projects dealing with energy and other matters. This paper explores the substantive legal issues and procedural options for identifying beneficiaries in such contexts and ways of working with them despite the legal uncertainty. It gives considerable attention to process, an approach reflecting the diversity of the situations on the ground. To explore these issues, the paper draws upon several relevant bodies of learning on forestry projects and programs, including the literatures on land, tree and forest tenure, legal pluralism, forest project design and implementation, the protection of indigenous peoples, and resettlement issues associated with development projects. The paper also explores how contracts or agreements could be used to work with the beneficiaries and clearly capture the different parties' rights and responsibilities. It examines experiences discussed in the literature, and reviews three good practice projects. Lessons are drawn from both those projects and earlier relevant experiences.
    • Identifying with Antarctica in the Ecocultural Imaginary: Documentary, Identity, and Global Connections

      Nielsen, H (Routledge, In Press)
      Antarctica is physically inaccessible for most, but it lives in the imaginations of many. In this chapter, I argue imagined versions of place play an important role in why and how even distant locations such as Antarctica are valued. Given the impact of highly extractive and polluting ecocultural identities and histories, Antarctica cannot be seen as a place apart from the rest of the world. Rather, the continent needs to be understood as a place of global importance, and one that can be incorporated into the ecocultural identities of those all over planet Earth. I examine the case studies of two Antarctic documentaries that focus on humans who live and work on the continent: Werner Herzogs Encounters at the End of the World (2007) and Antony Powells Antarctica: A Year on Ice (2014). The chapter asks how such documentaries can bring Antarctica into everyday consciousness of people around the world, challenge preconceptions about the far south, and help audiences reimagine their own human connections and interactions with the ice.
    • Identity and relationship in ecological consciousness :

      Vick, Rebeccah.
      Thesis (MArts(ReligionStudies))--University of South Australia, 2001.
    • Identity and relationship in ecological consciousness :

      School of Education., University of South Australia.; Vick, Rebeccah. (2001)
      Thesis (MArts(ReligionStudies))--University of South Australia, 2001.
    • If creation is a gift

      Manolopoulos, Mark (1968-) (State Univ. of New York Press, 2010)
      Thanksgivings -- What if? -- Creation-gift-aporia -- A brief history of gifts -- Unwrapping Marion's gift -- Oscillation -- Towards an oscillational eco-ethos -- After-thought
    • If Not all Stones Are Alive : Radical Relationality in Animism Studies

      Harvey, Graham (1959-)
      Irving Hallowell's conversation with an Anishinaabe (Ojibwa) elder in the early twentieth century has gained increasing attention in recent decades. It has been cited by many involved in the multi-disciplinary turns to ontology, materiality and relationality. In particular, it has inspired many researchers involved in the new (approach to) animism . This article considers efforts to rethink what person or relation might mean - in the light of Indigenous ontologies and of the ferment of reflection and analysis offered by many colleagues. It proposes that we have not yet sufficiently understood what the elder intended by telling Hallowell that only some stones are animate. A more radically relational understanding of personhood has implications for the ways in which we approach and engage with/in nature, culture, science and religion.
    • 'If You Go Down to the Woods Today...': Spirituality and the Eco-Protest Lifestyle

      Andy Letcher (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2002-03-07)
      Emerging from the anti-road protests which marked the 1990s, Eco-Paganism is a collective term for the diverse set of de-traditionalised, but Pagan-like, spiritualities found within road-protest culture. Whilst the actions, and direct-action, of protesters may not always appear outwardly to be religious, many protesters are motivated by their religious convictions such as the paramount belief in the sanctity of nature. The protest lifestyle, involving an immersion in nature through living outdoors and sleeping in treehouses, reinforces these convictions. These sentiments, and the anguish felt by practitioners as they engage in environmental struggle, find expression through spontaneous rituals. This article provides an overview of the protest lifestyle, suggesting ways in which it informs Eco-Pagan religiosity. An example of a typical ad-hoc religious ritual is provided.
    • Ignatian Pedagogy Certificate Final Project

      Duffie, G. Patrick (Loyola eCommons, 2017-04-01)
    • Igreja Católica, direitos reprodutivos e direitos ambientais

      Alves, José Eustáquio Diniz; Cavenaghi, Suzana Marta (DIALNET OAI Articles, 2017)
      The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss some points of intersection of the human rights realm with the field of religion, addressing in particular the agreements and disagreements regarding the doctrines of the Catholic Church on reproductive rights and environmental rights. To that end, we reconstruct a historical and relational narrative of the debate about the origins and evolution of the demographic transition and of human rights, since the time of the French Revolution. By means of a comparative and contextualized analysis, we portray about the debate on population and sustainable development and the views on reproductive and environmental rights set forth in United Nations International Conferences and in the encyclicals Humanae Vitae and Laudato Si '. As society and the environment are going through on opposite routes, the need to reconstitute the planet's biocapacity requires a reflection on the dynamics of demoeconomic growth and the achievement of reproductive and environmental rights. Accordingly, we point out that in the democratic State of law, with respect to the principles of secularity, religious tolerance is essential for the adequate consideration of reproductive rights issues and for deepening the debate on environmental rights.
    • Igreja Católica, direitos reprodutivos e direitos ambientais

      Alves, José Eustáquio Diniz; Cavenaghi, Suzana Marta (2017)
      The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss some points of intersection of the human rights realm with the field of religion, addressing in particular the agreements and disagreements regarding the doctrines of the Catholic Church on reproductive rights and environmental rights. To that end, we reconstruct a historical and relational narrative of the debate about the origins and evolution of the demographic transition and of human rights, since the time of the French Revolution. By means of a comparative and contextualized analysis, we portray about the debate on population and sustainable development and the views on reproductive and environmental rights set forth in United Nations International Conferences and in the encyclicals Humanae Vitae and Laudato Si &apos;. As society and the environment are going through on opposite routes, the need to reconstitute the planet&apos;s biocapacity requires a reflection on the dynamics of demoeconomic growth and the achievement of reproductive and environmental rights. Accordingly, we point out that in the democratic State of law, with respect to the principles of secularity, religious tolerance is essential for the adequate consideration of reproductive rights issues and for deepening the debate on environmental rights.
    • Igreja Católica, direitos reprodutivos e direitos ambientais

      Cavenaghi, Suzana; Alves, José Eustáquio Diniz
      O objetivo deste texto é apresentar e debater alguns pontos de interseção da esfera dos direitos humanos com o campo da religião, abordando, em especial, os encontros e desencontros referentes às doutrinas da Igreja Católica sobre os direitos reprodutivos e os direitos ambientais. Para tanto, reconstituímos uma narrativa histórica e relacional do debate sobre as origens e a evolução da transição demográfica e dos direitos humanos, desde a época da Revolução Francesa. Por meio de uma análise comparativa e contextualizada, apresentamos o debate sobre população e desenvolvimento sustentável e as visões sobre os direitos reprodutivos e ambientais expostos em Conferências da Organização das Nações Unidas e nas encíclicas Humanae Vitae e Laudato Si’. Argumentamos que desde o final do século XVIII até os dias atuais, o progresso humano se deu às custas do regresso ambiental e, nessa rota divergente, aumenta a tensão entre a dinâmica do crescimento populacional e a efetivação dos direitos reprodutivos e dos direitos ambientais. Desta forma, assinalamos que no Estado democrático de direito, com respeito aos princípios da laicidade, a tolerância religiosa é essencial para o adequado equacionamento da questão dos direitos reprodutivos e para o aprofundamento do debate sobre os direitos ambientais.
    • Ile&#39; Mo Ku O: Earth I Greet You: Black Gods of Nature Saving Black Lives

      Smith, J. Phoenix (Digital Commons @ CIIS, 2016-01-01)
      African Traditional Religions are experiencing a renaissance in the Diaspora. Millions of persons around the world of diverse ethnicities are being called to the healing power of the Oricha, who are deities of nature. From Brazil, Trinidad, Cuba, to New York, Houston and Oakland California many African American descendants of Slaves have been practicing the diverse lineages of the Oricha tradition for over 60 years on U.S. soil. Oricha devotees have practiced resistance to White Supremacy for hundreds of years and through this devotion have created pathways for healing, restoration, and resiliency. Phoenix will share the Earth principles of the Oricha she uses in her work as a leading Ecotherapist and initiated Priest of Aganyu the Oricha known as the spirit of the wilderness, to work with local social justice communities and communities of color here in Oakland through teaching, ceremony, and mentorship, including leading 2 years of water ceremonies around the Bay.
    • Ima li nade za zemlju i njezine stanovnike? Poruka velike i male apokalipse proroka Izaije čitana svjetlom teologije zemlje u mraku ekološke krize (Iz 24 – 27; 34 – 35)

      Pardon, Đurica (Catholic Faculty of Theology, University of Zagreb, 2017-07-20)
      Uvjerenje da Zemlji i zemaljskoj stvarnosti mora doći kraj jedna je od temeljnih postavki s kojom se susrećemo ne samo u (neo)apokaliptičkom promatranju svijeta, nego i u općim kršćanskim teološki obrazlaganim istinama o materijalnom svijetu i zemaljskoj stvarnosti. Na primjeru tekstova Izaijine male i velike apokalipse u ovom se članku pokazuje da biblijska vjera i nada koju apokaliptici svjedoče smjera riješiti problem izemljenosti i izdomljenosti tražeći odgovor koji će zadovoljiti ljude i narode što se nalaze u stanju iskorijenjenosti iz svoje zemlje bilo da u njoj ne žive ili se, iako u njoj žive, osjećaju i doživljavaju od nje odvojeni. Apokaliptičko shvaćanje zemlje počiva na uvjerenju da je »realna« i stvarna zemlja mjesto prebivanja s Bogom, mirnog života s ljudima i sklada među stvorenjima. Od te ideje Izrael nikada u povijesti svojeg postojanja nije odustao. Želja i čežnja za ponovnom ustanovom (novoga) Božjeg kraljevstva po svojoj naravi podrazumijeva povratak naroda na svoju zemlju, na svoj prirodni teritorij. Apokaliptički pojmovi »nebo« i »nebeski Jeruzalem« ne mogu se odvojiti od svojih realnih i tvarnih (ovo)zemaljskih pojmova i shvaćanja tih prostora. Zemlja, upravo ona koju je Bog obećao i dao Izraelu je bila i jest stvarnost u kojoj je Izrael živio i još uvijek živi, premda još ne u potpunosti. Iz čitanja tekstova Izaijine male i velike apokalipse (Iz 24 – 27; 34 – 35) u svjetlu teologije zemlje proizlazi i pitanje o opravdanosti teološkog tumačenja apokaliptičkih tekstova kao onih koji navještaju razaranje i uništenje Zemlje, planeta na kojem ljudi žive, kao i cjelokupne materijalne stvarnosti. Čitanje biblijskih apokaliptičkih tekstova iz perspektive teologije zemlje čini se opravdanim alatom koji bi mogao pružiti jasnije razumijevanje teme zemlje u današnjem povijesnom trenutku, kad osjećamo i doživljavamo da su naša Zemlja i ljudski rod s njom zajedno, u svojoj opstojnosti i dostojanstvu ugroženi, a teološka obrazlaganja o odnosu budućeg života s prostorno‑vremenskim datostima i zemaljskosti još uvijek nedostatna.