• Sacral geography of Orthodox Christianity and religious tourism

      Grčić Mirko (Serbian Geographical Society, 2010-01-01)
      Introductory part of the paper briefly presents the case study of sacred geography. This scientific discipline, as a branch of cultural geography, deserves more attention due to the development of cultural tourism and the protection of cultural heritage in globalization. Aim is to systematize and display characteristics of sacred objects and places of pilgrimage in the traditional orthodox Christianity. The author hopes that this work will attract the attention of geographers and intellectual circles, and stimulate researchers to devote greater attention to this important and current issue.
    • Sacral socio-ecological community: theories of contemporary social catholicism and engaged Buddhism in complementary practice

      Lee, Hyung Kyu (2015)
      This dissertation provides a substantive study of the faith-based Mondragón Cooperative Movement in Spain and the Indra’s Net Life Community in Korea, analyzing and critically comparing the ethical values of Catholic Social Teaching and Socially Engaged Asian Buddhism. By evaluating the extent of their success in dealing with socioecological concerns, the importance of religio-ethical values and principles to the disciplines of social and environmental ethics is stressed, offering a new, religiously sensitive approach to ecological wellbeing. As this dissertation argues, the thought and work of Mondragón and Indra’s Net offer important resources for conceptualizing ecological ethics and social justice in and among human communities. This comparison considers two questions: First, what alternative economic system might engage, in context, socioecological religious values and be implemented as an alternative to neoclassical economics? Second, what socioecological ethical principles provide effective intellectual resources to critically assess today’s global economic and ecological crises, and suggest a way to resolve them? These questions are addressed by a study of the ethical and social implications of modern economic systems, as compared to a worker-owned cooperative movement and a socially engaged Asian Buddhist liberation movement, both of which offer an alternative to current economic configurations. Inspired by the communitarian personalist thought of Mondragón’s priest-founder, José María Arizmendiarrieta, and the ecological thought of the Venerable Tobŏp, based on Huayan Buddhism’s philosophy of "interdependent co-arising" (pratītyasamupāda), these grassroots socio-ecological movements provide relevant, religion-based social and ecological teachings that present concrete proposals for economic and social practice. Social Catholicism and socially engaged Buddhism, as evidenced by these two movements, apply a dynamic social-spiritual ideology consonant with their traditions' developing social-ecological consciousness, thereby striving to promote the wellbeing of Earth, humanity, and all life.
    • Sacred Forests and the Global Challenge of Biodiversity Conservation: The Case of Benin and Togo

      Dominique Juhé-Beaulaton; Centre d’études des mondes africains (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2008-01-16)
      In southern Benin and Togo, sacred forests are often the only remaining patches of forest vegetation, but are threatened with destruction because of the growing demand for arable land and the effects of cultural change. In this paper, I outline broad historical and cultural changes since Europeans first arrived in this area and identify the different stakeholders involved directly or indirectly in the management of these forests. In recent years, new policies for the conservation of sacred sites have been drawn up at international meetings, and these have stimulated scientific research into the conservation potential of sacred forests in Benin and Togo. These, in turn, have influenced the actions of non-government organizations in the area and led to the establishment of national environmental and cultural policies. On the local level, these events have contributed to changes in the management of sacred sites and in the cultural practices of the local political and religious leaders who control them. Problems of succession and decreasing respect for religious sanctions have reduced the power of the traditional leaders, with negative impacts on the status of the sacred forests. One solution proposed by the national forest authorities is to ‘restore’ these forest patches by tree planting. Ecotourism is also seen as a new way to conserve their biodiversity. Policies such as officially sponsored tree planting, the clarification of the legal status of the forests, and the expansion of local economic opportunities will necessarily strengthen the role of the state in these rural areas, and at the same time cause traditional leaders to renegotiate both their status and their forest management practices.
    • Sacred forests and the global challenge of biodiversity conservation: the case of Benin and Togo

      Centre d'Etudes des Mondes Africains (CEMAf) ; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) - École pratique des hautes études (EPHE) - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (UP1) - Université de Provence - Aix-Marseille 1; Convention INRA; Juhé-Beaulaton, Dominique (HAL CCSD, 2008)
      International audience
    • Sacred groves and serpent‐gods moderate human–snake relations

      Félix Landry Yuan; U. Prashanth Ballullaya; Ramesh Roshnath; Timothy C. Bonebrake; Palatty Allesh Sinu (Wiley, 2020-03-01)
      Abstract Serpent‐god worship is an ancient tradition still practiced in many sacred groves across the Western Ghats of India. Although sacred groves there hold ecological conservation value, few studies have focused on arguably the most iconic taxon in the region, snakes. We thus investigated the impact of sacred groves and snake deity worshipping on attitudes towards snakes by conducting surveys with people who had entered sacred groves in the past. We found that very few participants who had encountered snakes inside sacred groves in the past harmed them during these encounters. However, nearly a quarter of all participants do harm snakes if encountered outside sacred groves. We also found that a larger proportion of participants who do not harm snakes outside sacred groves worship snake deities, relative to those that do harm them. Our work thus highlights the influence of sacred groves and snake deity worshipping on pacifistic human–snake relations in Southwestern India. A free Plain Language Summary can be found within the Supporting Information of this article.
    • Sacred Harvest: Wendell Berry, Christian Agrarianism and the Creation of an Environmental Ethic

      Crouse, Julie Christine (CU Scholar, 2010-01-01)
      Wendell Berry, a Christian agriculturalist and writer exemplifies through his life and work a new agrarian environmental ethic. This work will present the major tenets of that ethic and place this unique dictate of consciousness within an ongoing conversation about the importance of human morality in an ever-changing natural environment. Berry’s ethic questions the current notion of farming as a profane endeavor, and seeks to bring to light the reality of a connection between humans and landscapes, as well as between religion and agricultural practice. Through presenting the notion of bucolic landscapes as sacred space, Berry endeavors to question the current understanding of sacred realms in connection to how we view the natural world, as well as how we act in relation to that world. This thesis seeks to provide an explanation of Berry’s Christian agrarian ethic as a necessary voice among many within the environmental debate of our present society.
    • Sacred landscapes and cultural politics : planting a tree

      Arnold, Philip P. (1957-) (Ashgate, 2001)
    • Sacred Places and Sustainable Development

      Anna Halafoff; Matthew Clarke (MDPI AG, 2018-10-01)
      Religious beliefs are not only profound, some of them are also pervasive, persistent and persuasive. It follows that the cultural and religious experiences of communities often play a central role in determining their worldviews and the ways in which they understand their own circumstances. These worldviews, it follows, can thereby assist in providing narratives for community development in places that have particular meaning to these communities and individuals within them, and thereby enhance the long-term success of such initiatives. One often-overlooked aspect in research up until recently is the role that these often sacred places can play in sustainable development. This paper undertakes a study of development spaces situated in sacred places, in this case of a women’s Buddhist monastery on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand, devoted to gender equity. It begins with an overview of research pertaining to religion and development, religion in contemporary societies, and sacred places, and concludes with an analysis of the case study data that recognizes the need to consider the significance of sacred places, and narratives attached to them, in sustainable community development.
    • Sacred places and sustainable development

      Halafoff, Anna; Clarke, Matthew (MDPI, 2018-10-01)
      Religious beliefs are not only profound, some of them are also pervasive, persistent and persuasive. It follows that the cultural and religious experiences of communities often play a central role in determining their worldviews and the ways in which they understand their own circumstances. These worldviews, it follows, can thereby assist in providing narratives for community development in places that have particular meaning to these communities and individuals within them, and thereby enhance the long-term success of such initiatives. One often-overlooked aspect in research up until recently is the role that these often sacred places can play in sustainable development. This paper undertakes a study of development spaces situated in sacred places, in this case of a women’s Buddhist monastery on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand, devoted to gender equity. It begins with an overview of research pertaining to religion and development, religion in contemporary societies, and sacred places, and concludes with an analysis of the case study data that recognizes the need to consider the significance of sacred places, and narratives attached to them, in sustainable community development.
    • Sacred Places in the Construction of Indigenous Environmentalism

      Graham Harvey (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2002-03-07)
      Indigenous people have often been linked with ‘nature’. Recently this has been complimentary, based on the assessment that nature is good, but this was not always the case. This paper is interested in the construction of indigeneity as environmentalist, and in the construction of environmentalism with reference to indigeneity. It is particularly concerned with challenging various relevant Western notions from the perspective that indigenous religious traditions might offer quite different ontologies and engagements. It takes note of the wider context of a conflict between colonialism and sovereignty which entangle these issues in traumatic crises but also underpin significant possibilities for change.
    • Sacred Places in the Construction of Indigenous Environmentalism

      Harvey, Graham (2002-07)
      This article discusses the notion of "sacred place" in the construction (by indigenous and other-than-indigenous people) of (alleged and actual) environmental worldviews, attitudes and activism among indigenous people
    • Sacred Space/Place

      Faulstich, Paul (Scholarship @ Claremont, 2006-01-01)
      Landscape, space, and place are three concepts that merge together to create the human experience of the environment. Space is the most basic concept of geography; it is the three-dimensional extent in which objects and events occur. Landscapes and places are both contained within space.
    • Sacrifical sites, types and function

      Örnulv Vorren (The Donner Institute, 1987-01-01)
      Much has been written and said about Saami mythology and pre-Christian religion. There is, however, considerably less documentation of concrete cultural elements in scholarly descriptions. These investigations are considered important not only because they aim to provide documentation that can be used for studies of Saami mythology and pre-Christian religion. They also provide material that can throw light on the function of the holy places in a social context through analysis of their origin, their connections with certain families and persons, their associations with the siidas, their location within the areas where the Saamis from these siidas gained their livelihood, etc. The materials collected about the sacrificial sites also play an important role in studying the course of events leading up to the differentiation of Saami hunting and gathering culture. A question that has frequently arisen in the course of this work is with what powers or deities the different sacrificial sites were associated. This is naturally connected with their origin and their form. This, in turn, is reflected in the traditions and legends recounted concerning them. It is also reflected in their location in the physical environment and in the kinds of offerings that have been found. In the materials so far collected it is possible to distinguish between about eight different types of sacrificial site and holy mountain or fell according to their form and location: holy fells, rock formations, stone boulders, holes, cracks in fells, springs, lakes, ring-shaped sacrificial sites. Missionaries were urged to destroy the offering sites.
    • Sagesse du jardin et harmonie du monde : introduction

      Centre André Chastel : Laboratoire de recherche sur le patrimoine français et l'histoire de l'art occidental (CACLRPFHAO); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) - Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication (MCC) - Université Paris-Sorbonne (UP4); Brunon, Hervé (HAL CCSD, 2011-02-05)
      Mise en ordre symbolique du monde, le jardin a fréquemment été associé à la sagesse, tour à tour considéré en tant que lieu originel de béatitude où s'allient beauté et bonté d'après le mythe du Paradis terrestre, refuge permettant un idéal de vie à l'écart du siècle pour l'épicurisme ou l'idéologie de la villégiature, métaphore du travail d'amélioration de la pensée et de la civilisation suivant le mot de Voltaire, support d'une éducation esthétique à la contemplation selon le philosophe contemporain Rosario Assunto, ou encore laboratoire pour inventer les équilibres de demain entre société et environnement. L'idée morale du jardin - ou du jardinage - comme figure de juste connaissance et de juste conduite s'articule étroitement à celle du jardin comme microcosme, image physique et harmonieuse de la complexité de l'univers. Grâce à la rencontre de spécialistes venus de différents horizons, le colloque invite à une réflexion sur l'importance et l'actualité des relations entre ces deux registres. En quoi le jardin offre-t-il, à travers l'histoire et aujourd'hui, un modèle pour régler le rapport à soi, aux autres, au monde ? Comment l'exigence d'une action responsable sur ce qui nous entoure, cruciale à l'heure des défis environnementaux planétaires, peut-elle s'inspirer de cet espace de médiation entre nature et culture et, réciproquement, s'y matérialiser par des formes sensibles ?
    • Saints, revelers and offenders : relationships in Festa space-time

      Formosa, Saviour (Society of St. Mary and King George V Band Club, 2015)
      Social interactionism occurs in space-time where the phenomenon morphs from the thematic activity to the geographical space it occurs in and the spatial relationships between the actors. The Maltese festa posits a ripe scenario for analysis of such interactionism and the inherent effects on safety and security. Whilst the fundamental festa scope banks on the sacred aspect, the activity moved through a village centre to a wider interactive (entire town) secular reality. This study investigates the occurrence of offending during the festa and the shoulder weeks for potential relationships between the spaces relevant to the activity through a study of expected and observed offences. The CRISOLA model serves as the basis for this study in the fields of crime, social issues and landuse and their impact on safety and security within the villages hosting the festa. The festa as a cause of crime by the relevant parties and significant others and its impact on social cohesion and operational requirements serves as a basis for proactive measures to be taken by the religious, secular and enforcement entities.