• Table of Contents

      Law Review, Seattle University (Seattle University School of Law Digital Commons, 2019-02-19)
    • (Table S2) Global dataset of peatland basal ages

      Treat, Claire C; Broothaerts, Nils; Dalton, April S; Dommain, René; Douglas, Tom; Drexler, Judith; Finkelstein, Sarah A; Grosse, Guido; Hope, Geoffrey; Hutchings, Jack A; et al. (PANGAEA, 2017-03-01)
    • Taboo and Political Authority in Conservation Policy: A Case Study of the Licuati Forest in Maputaland, Mozambique

      Southern African Botanical Diversity Network (SABONET), University of Zululand and University of Pretoria; Alphaeus M Zobolo; Department of Botany, University of Zululand; Stefan J Siebert; Department of Botany, North-West University; Abraham E van Wyk; Department of Botany, University of Pretoria; Samira A Izidine; Department of Botany, National Institute of Agricultural Research (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2008-01-16)
      In Mozambique, food shortages caused by years of civil war, an insatiable need for cheap sources of energy and a burgeoning human population have placed considerable pressure on the environment through unsustainable harvesting of natural resources. Many threatened forests lie within the development zone of Maputo. The Licuáti Forest Reserve [LFR] is one such area, originally established to ensure sustainable harvesting of valuable timber trees. The LFR is also of great cultural significance to the Ronga people, as it contains a sacred forest. In recent years, deforestation in and around the LFR has been taking place at 1.1% per annum because the enforcement of laws to counter illegal extraction has been weak, resulting in changes in forest structure and a decline in the diversity of large tree species. Urbanisation has resulted in the breakdown of cultural taboos and threatens not only the loss of plant resources in the LFR, but also the indigenous knowledge systems of the Ronga. The conservation status of the sacred area under threat was evaluated by use of a questionnaire, and the needs of the community determined to highlight important issues. This study revealed that traditional values and cultural rites of sacred groves could be incorporated into national sustainable development plans. This study also recognizes how local elites have particular interests in the conservation of sites that legitimize their status. Preservation of the cultural significance of sacred forests can therefore not stand apart from local politics, sustainable harvesting and conservation management.
    • Tactics of infidels

      Lambert, L. A. (Louis Aloisius), 1835-1910 (Buffalo : Peter Paul & Brother, 1887.Princeton Theological Seminary Library, 1887)
    • Talvivirren puolustuspuhe

      Pihkala, Panu Petteri (2013)
      Non Peer reviewed
    • TAMING THE TEESTA: EXPLORING THE HOLISTIC EFFECTS OF HYDROELECTRIC DAM DEVELOPMENT ON THE TEESTA RIVER THROUGH DOCUMENTARY FILM

      Graham, Taylor (SIT Digital Collections, 2015-04-01)
      Since time immemorial, the Lepcha people have called the Himalayan region that makes up the modern state of Sikkim their home and have held sacred the rivers, mountains, and forests that make up the biologically diverse region. Over the past two decades, India’s rapid development has generated a powerful thirst for electricity, and the country has increasingly looked to the cold, powerful rivers thundering from the Himalayas to supply that desired power. Hydroelectric projects have been proposed and implemented throughout the Himalayan region. Nowhere, however, are the dams as numerous or their effects as acutely felt as in India’s northwestern state of Sikkim, where a ‘cascade’ of run‐of‐the‐river hydroelectric projects is springing into existence. There, on the Teesta River, multiple dam projects threaten the rich biodiversity of the region, the livelihoods of those who live along the Teesta’s course, and the very existence of the Lepcha people’s most cherished river. Through documentary film, this project examines three crucial and oftoverlooked repercussions of hydroelectric projects on the Teesta River: the threat posed to the endangered Golden Masheer fish, the problems faced by those who receive compensation from the National Hydroelectric Power Cooperation for damages caused by dam development, and the degradation wrought upon the Lepcha people’s cultural identity. The film does so by examining the individual stories of stakeholders who feel the effects of these ramifications most severely. Through formal and informal interviews with stakeholders and experts alike, this film offers a holistic perspective of and draws awareness to the river as the region’s pulsing lifeline. Additionally, the project sheds light on the reasons India has turned so fervently to hydroelectric development. Finally, the film looks to the future in an attempt to spur dialogue among Indians and interested parties around the globe.
    • Tarrence Richard

      Ross, Rachel Talbot (USM Digital Commons, 2002-05-17)
      Richard Tarrence was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1945, the second-oldest of seven siblings. His parents moved to Ohio from the South in the 1930s; his maternal grandfather was a bishop in the AME church, and his paternal grandfather was a sharecropper. He was drafted in 1965 and spent four years in the Air Force, including time in Vietnam. He married his ex-wife, Loretta Wilson, who was from Maine, and they moved to Portland in 1975. He completed a degree in Criminal Justice at USM in 1979, and spent twenty-two years working for Allstate Insurance. The family lived in Portland, South Portland, and eventually settled in Gorham. At the time of this interview, Tarrence was the chairman of the board of Green Memorial AME Zion Church, and was involved with the Health 2000 AIDS awareness program there. Tarrence discusses his family traditions, religious community, experience as one of the few black families in the greater Portland area, and his participation in the local theater community.
    • Taylor Chapel A.M.E Bulletin

      Kentucky Library Research Collections, (TopSCHOLAR®, 1949-01-01)
      Taylor's [Taylor] Chapel A.M.E. church was built in Bowling Green, KY in 1872. These newsletters highlight the life of the church with member news, membership information, events, programs, local news and advertisers/sponsors and some of financial data such as donations.
    • Taylor, "Dark Green Religion: Nature Spirituality and the Planetary Future"

      Shepherd, Kelly; University of British Columbia, Okanagan (Athabasca University Press, 2015-02-27)
    • Teachers collective’s perceptions of educational environment security

      Matyushina A.S.; Konopleva I.N. (Moscow State University of Psychology and Education, 2012-01-01)
      The contribution is dedicated to research of teachers collective’s perceptions of educational environment security. In the process of the research the authors found out that for a significant number of teachers the psychological atmosphere of their educational institution is not comfortable. Psychological security of educational process of an educational institution, experienced by teachers as a state of protection from psychological violence, satisfaction of main needs for personal communication, is a condition which enables positive aspects of psychic and professional development of all participants of educational process. Empirical research showed that factors of social-psychological security are interrelated, but the individual-personal factor is the defining one, because psychologically comfortable situations in the educational process depend on their individual perception and experiencing by the subjects of this process.
    • Teachers' conceptions concerning the environment across nine Mediterranean countries

      Sciences et Société ; Historicité, Éducation et Pratiques (EA S2HEP) ; École normale supérieure - Lyon (ENS Lyon) - Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (UCBL); CNR Italie (CNR) ; CNR - Consiglio Nationale delle Ricerche; Istituto di Ricerche sula Populazione e le Politiche Social del CNR (IPPS) ; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche [Roma] (CNR); IRPPS, CNR, Roma (IRPPS) ; CNR - Consiglio Nationale delle Ricerche; European Project : 26914, BIOHEAD-CITIZEN; Clément, Pierre; Caravita, Silvia; Valente, Adriana; Cerbara, Loredana; Laurent, Charline (HAL CCSD, 2010)
      Text of the oral communication
    • Teaching Environmental Ethics to MBA Students

      Benton, Raymond, Jr. (Loyola eCommons, 2012-03-01)
      This essay explains the author's approach to teaching environmental ethics in the graduate school of business. The approach is based on a religious rather than a philosophical perspective, taking its light not from theology or religious studies but from anthropology. The author discusses the origins of the course, then explains the anthropological model of religion as a cultural system and briefly applies that model to economics, focusing on the worldview that undergirds it. The course then shifts to how others understand the world in which they live, introduces Aldo Leopold's A Sand County Almanac, and ends by speculating on what might come next if the course were a third longer than it is.
    • Teachings of the earth : Zen and the environment

      Loori, John Daido (Shambhala, 2007)
    • Techno-demonology: Naming, Understanding and Redeeming the A/Human Agencies with Which We Share Our World

      Bronislaw Szerszynski; Lancaster University (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2006-02-24)
      In this paper I argue that an important strand of ecotheology should be an articulated techno-demonology—an understanding of the ways that technologies increasingly confront us as indifferent or malign agencies. Drawing particularly on the New Testament language of spiritual agencies, I consider in turn three necessary components of techno-demonology. First, techno-demonology needs a taxonomic nomenclature, one which ‘names’ techno-demonological phenomena in a manner that reveals the specific ways in which the technologies can stand before us as autonomous powers. As a contribution to this task I distinguish between elementals (stoicheia) and powers (dynameis)—between technical systems which have become treated as ends in themselves, and have thus started to control human action, and technologies whose unanticipated side-effects overwhelm their intended purposes. Second, I suggest that techno-demonology should include an understanding of how such techno-demons arise; I thus give historical explanations for the proliferation of technological elementals and powers in the contemporary world. Finally, I argue that techno-demonology should include the redemptive task of restoring technology to its rightful place in creation.
    • Technologies of the late medieval self: Ineffability, distance, and subjectivity in the "Book of Margery Kempe"

      Mueller, Crystal L (e-Publications@Marquette, 2007-01-01)
      This dissertation examines the late medieval self as a conjoined construction of socially negotiated identity and privately differentiated subjectivity; in so doing, it calls attention to the complex, emphatic, deeply defined subjectivity that emerges in the Book of Margery Kempe. This consideration of Kempe's Book is informed by study of late medieval works that feature self-construction in parallel modes to Kempe's: testing in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, pilgrimage in The Canterbury Tales (most particularly The Wife of Bath's Prologue ), and mystical visions in Julian of Norwich's Shewings. In these texts, identity emerges as a social negotiation and subjectivity as a site of inaccessibility. But, none of these selves is constructed with such complexity as Margery Kempe's, nor is the subjectivity in any of these other texts so emphatically defined as hers. Finally, the dissertation traces the continuity of self-construction that extends into literature of the Renaissance, studying selected poems of John Donne ("A Valediction of Weeping' and "Holy Sonnet VII" ["Spit in my face you Jewes"]) and prose of Margaret Cavendish (A True Relation of My Birth, Breeding, and Life and The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World ). Given Kempe's emphatically defined subjectivity even among these Renaissance texts, the dissertation urges careful consideration in establishing and defining criteria for periodization, especially in light of the ongoing critical debate about when the self was "invented." Methodologically, the dissertation draws on modern social criticism (Aers; Beckwith; Carruthers), modern mystic criticism (McAvoy; Hollywood; Lochrie; Atkinson), and select literary theorists (Foucault; Peirce; Irigaray).
    • Technology and ecology. From ethics to Metaphysics, from negation of limits to the disclaimer of man

      Luca Valera (Universidad Pontificia Comillas, 2016-02-01)
      The impact of technologies on human action is a main issue in contemporary philosophy. In this paper I point out some of the key metaphysical and ethical issues of this ongoing technological revolution, highlighting an important change of paradigm: the metaphysical issue now arises within ethics. Today’s technology, indeed, opens up new possibilities: a man overcoming it is now at least conceivable, if not fully viable. The category of dependence is thus replaced by that of auto poiesis, in order to achieve perfection and to eliminate boundaries. In this regard, the technological possibilities are annihilating the «outdated» human subject, as it is profoundly determined by its limits. On the contrary, I show how the concept of limit may be a good starting point for an ontology of difference/identity: the limit, thus, allows us to recognize the identity and the difference. In contemporary environmentalism we can observe the opposite tendency: every individual —even the human being—is functional to the preservation of life (Ecosystem), and it can be, thus, sacrificed. In this regard, the overcoming of human nature coincides with the victory of Nature, i.e., of Life: life is to be protected, at all times, whether it is human or non-human life. The main reason of this fact is our naïve concept of Nature and our conception of the human being as a dangerous agent; the awareness of a great destructive power gained, however, cannot be a sufficient reason to consider the human being a cancer on the planet. In order to reestablish a proper relationship of man with himself and with the world, we finally need to develop an adequate anthropology, which takes into account the human person’s natural and spiritual nature, its limitations and its limits.
    • TECHNOLOGY, ETHICS, AND CULTURE

      Mitcham, Carl, ed. (2011-07-12)
    • Technology, Trust, and Religion : Roles of Religions in Controversies on Ecology and the Modification of Life

      Drees ,Willem (Leiden University Press, 2009)
      What does it mean to be human in a world of technology? What could be the role of religion in responding to the ecological crisis? Should we be concerned about the modification of food, and even of ourselves? Who do we trust to make decisions regarding our common future? What do we use our technology for? These are not questions for experts only. How can the wider public be involved? Do experts and the general public trust each other sufficiently? Or is the public ignorant, in the eyes of the scientists? And are too many engineers narrow minded, according to the general public? The contributors to this timely and necessary volume address expertise, trust and engagement, as we consider our technological condition , religious resources for the ecological crisis , biotechnology , and matters of trust between scientists and the general public. With contributions from leading scholars in the field, including James Miller from Queen's University, Canada and Tony Watling from the University College, London, this book will captivate a range of readers interested in the spirtitual dimension of of our culture and society.<p>Wat is de invloed van technologie op de menselijke cultuur? Welke rol kan religie spelen als reactie op de dreigende ecologische crisis? Moeten we ons zorgen maken over de modificatie van voedsel, en ook zelfs van de mens? Waar willen we technologische ontwikkelingen voor inzetten een aan wie vertrouwen wij beslissingen over onze toekomst toe? Dergelijke vragen gaan niet alleen de experts maar iedereen aan. Hoe kan het grote publiek deelnemen aan het technologische debat? Of is het publiek te onwetend om mee kunnen praten? In Technology, Trust and Religion gaan zestien wetenschappers op dit onderwerp in en worden deskundigheid, vertrouwen en betrokkenheid tegen het licht gehouden.
    • Technology, Trust, and Religion : Roles of Religions in Controversies on Ecology and the Modification of Life

      Drees, Willem (Leiden University PressLeiden University Press, 2009)
      What does it mean to be human in a world of technology? What could be the role of religion in responding to the ecological crisis? Should we be concerned about the modification of food, and even of ourselves? Who do we trust to make decisions regarding our common future? What do we use our technology for? These are not questions for experts only. How can the wider public be involved? Do experts and the general public trust each other sufficiently? Or is the public ignorant, in the eyes of the scientists? And are too many engineers narrow minded, according to the general public? The contributors to this timely and necessary volume address expertise, trust and engagement, as we consider our technological condition , religious resources for the ecological crisis , biotechnology , and matters of trust between scientists and the general public. With contributions from leading scholars in the field, including James Miller from Queen's University, Canada and Tony Watling from the University College, London, this book will captivate a range of readers interested in the spirtitual dimension of of our culture and society.