• Waking up to a warming world: prospects for Christian ethical deliberation amidst climate fears

      Northcott, Michael; O'Donovan, Oliver; Smith, Byron Glen (The University of Edinburgh, 2018-04-18)
      The recent rapid warming of the planet, driven overwhelmingly by human emissions
 and activities, represents a novel and dire threat to both human and natural systems.
 It also constitutes an unprecedented global injustice, with those facing the first and,
 in many cases, the worst impacts being least responsible for causing the problem: the
 global poor, other species and future generations. Awakening to such a threat also
 presents a challenge for ethical deliberation, through provoking deep emotional
 responses that disturb settled identities. In view of all this, the task of ethical
 deliberation is urgently required. Yet it is itself vulnerable to being derailed by a
 variety of coping mechanisms that operate to keep the true scale of the problem
 below the level of our full attention and prevent the necessary frank assessment of
 what may be required of us. These largely unconscious protective strategies also
 open the door to those very emotions being exploited by the cultural, economic and
 political forces primarily responsible for the crisis in the first place. Hence,
 superficial and inadequate responses proliferate while many feel paralysed into
 inaction.
 In the face of this threat to thought, this project seeks to articulate an identity
 and stance based on Christian theological resources that opens up new space for
 ethical deliberation in the face of climate fears. Instead of being paralysed by such
 fears, this thesis argues that fear can instead illuminate and motivate when it is
 resituated in the service of love through solidarity with the suffering Christ, the poor
 and with the whole community of creation.
    • Walking Between Worlds: Holding Multiple Worldviews as a Key for Ecological Transformation

      Canty, Jeanine M. (Digital Commons @ CIIS, 2014-01-01)
      The current ecological, social, and personal crises spark the need for radical transformation to shift from one world that is mechanistic, destructive, and egocentric to another that is relational, life affirming, and embedded in the widest understandings of interconnected selves. The author employed an organic research inquiry to depict the patterns of people making this shift, identified six qualities, and found that embracing these crises provides opportunity to enlarge individual and collective perspectives in a way that aligns with larger systems of life opening one up to what has been called the multicultural self, the ecological self, or the self-transforming self. These concepts demonstrate that, when one can navigate more than one worldview, one is more resilient and responsive.
    • Walking in the Garden

      EATWOT's International Theological Commission, 2013
      "The discourse on this crisis has involved players from practically all sectors of society and academic disciplines. However, the Church and people of faith in general have been slow in coming to the discussion table. This may be a reflection on what the beliefs and the perceptions believers have especially about the place of God in the environment and in environmental management. It also may be a reflection of what believers perceive to be their own role in the crisis. The Church has been unsure of the nature of its participation in the discourse and indeed whether theology has anything to offer to environmental management. This in part is what this paper is about. Does religion in general and Christian beliefs and perspectives in particular have anything to contribute to a positive understanding of the environment; do the Christian scriptures have anything to say about the environment and its management? What should be the basis for Christian involvement in environmental issues?"
    • Walking into the Frame: A Theological Exploration of Pilgrimage along Anton Mauve’s A Dutch Road

      Clingerman, Forrest (DigitalCommons@ONU, 2009-03-01)
      To offer a contemporary theological interpretation of pilgrimage, how might we describe the meaning of journeying and illustrate its spiritual depth? Integrating insights from the theology of culture and the theology of place, a philosophical theology of pilgrimage defines spiritual journeying as a uniquely dialectical movement of place and movement, being and action, dwelling and mobility. To show this, the first part of the essay provides an interpretation of a work of art, by investigating the unlikely but evocative description of pilgrimage found in the painting by Anton Mauve called A Dutch Road. In a reflection on this painting, the meaning of pilgrimage is found by walking intothe frame of the canvas. Second, a more critical examination of a Christian theology of pilgrimage is developed as a response to Mauve's painting. The movement of the traveler can be shown as the identification of the Christian with the communio viatorum, as well as in the movement between journey and destination. Thus, within the surface of a painting, we find an important portrayal of the relationship between finite and infinite as it appears in human journeys.
    • Walkway at the Morristown Green, First Presbyterian Church, tennis courts at Morristown Field Club

      The Morristown & Morris Township Public Library, The North Jersey History & Genealogy Center; Millar, George V.
      Walkway on the Morristown Green, First Presbyterian Church and chapel, tennis courts at the Morristown Field Club
    • "Wanneer hoop groei in 'n waaghalsige verbeelding": 'n pastorale blik op kuns in 'n konteks van gestremdheid

      Theron, J.P.J. (Prof); Myburgh, J.L. (Dr.); Joubert, Maryna (2009-08-25)
      Despite legislation to the effect intended to ensure the position of the disabled in society, disabled persons still find themselves largely marginalized in the South African context. During this research a group of about twenty participants, of whom about one-half are disabled, were involved in an inclusive process of art-making. The aim of the research was to challenge the dominant discourse which holds that making art is only for the select, talented few. This research was undertaken according to the scientific guidelines of practical theology. Contextual theology was used as a starting point, with emphasis on the participatory- and narrative approaches. The characteristics of pastoral care created an atmosphere which was conducive to the disabled participants discovering and developing hope for a more rewarding future. The research culminated in an exhibition in a national museum, which could contribute to an additional dimension in the narrative of the disabled participants.
    • War and Border Crossings: Ethics When Cultures Clash

      French, Peter A. and Short, Jason A. (2016-01-08)
    • War and Nature in Classical Athens and Today: Demoting and Restoring the Underground Goddesses

      Schavrien, Judy (Digital Commons @ CIIS, 2010-07-01)
      A gendered analysis of social and religious values in 5th century BCE illuminates the Athenian decline from democracy to bully empire, through pursuit of a faux virility. Using a feminist hermeneutics of suspicion, the study contrasts two playwrights bookending the empire: Aeschylus, who elevated the sky pantheon Olympians and demoted both actual Athenian women and the Furies—deities linked to maternal ties and nature, and Sophocles, who granted Oedipus, his maternal incest purified, an apotheosis in the Furies’ grove. The latter work, presented at the Athenian tragic festival some 50 years after the first, advocated restoration of respect for female flesh and deity. This redemptive narrative placed the life of Athens— democracy and empire—in the wider context of Nature. Present-day parallels are drawn.
    • War and Nature in Classical Athens and Today: Demoting and Restoring the Underground Goddesses

      Schavrien, Judy (Digital Commons @ CIIS, 2010-07-01)
      A gendered analysis of social and religious values in 5th century BCE illuminates the Athenian decline from democracy to bully empire, through pursuit of a faux virility. Using a feminist hermeneutics of suspicion, the study contrasts two playwrights bookending the empire: Aeschylus, who elevated the sky pantheon Olympians and demoted both actual Athenian women and the Furies—deities linked to maternal ties and nature, and Sophocles, who granted Oedipus, his maternal incest purified, an apotheosis in the Furies’ grove. The latter work, presented at the Athenian tragic festival some 50 years after the first, advocated restoration of respect for female flesh and deity. This redemptive narrative placed the life of Athens— democracy and empire—in the wider context of Nature. Present-day parallels are drawn.
    • Warren County Historical Society (MSS 206)

      TopSCHOLAR®, 2008-04-13
      Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 206. This collection consists chiefly of administrative papers related to the Society, including minutes, yearbooks, correspondence, and clippings. Also includes historical essays written by Warren County students.
    • Warren County's Legacy for the Quest to Eliminate Health Disparities

      Lee, Charles (Digital Commons: The Legal Scholarship Repository @ Golden Gate University School of Law, 2010-08-11)
      At least two paradigm shifts have revolutionized the field of environmental health since Rachel Carson’s day. One occurred when environmental health encountered civil rights, forming the environmental justice movement. We are in the midst of the second, as environmental health reunited with architecture and urban planning. Significantly, these two paradigm shifts are converging. This article will examine how this convergence is taking place, and its significant implications for efforts to achieve environmental justice, community health and sustainability, and the elimination of health disparities.
    • Waste land: theological reflection on brownfield rehabilitation

      Ede, Paul (St Mary's College, University of St Andrews, 2014-10-31)
      In counterpoint to the preceding papers, Paul Ede offers a reflection on the relationship between contemporary ecology and Christology. His paper draws on his experience of involvement with a community church in the practicalities of the restoration of a brownfield site in the Possilpark area of Glasgow. The paper expresses much of his personal passion about encouraging charismatic and Pentecostal communities to discover the value of creation care within the mission of the Church, and reflects on the implications of the project in the light of Christological, Trinitarian and biblical perspectives.
    • Water and Scriptures Ancient Roots for Sustainable Development

      Manasi, S; Raju, K. V (Springer International Publishing, 2017)
      This collection of papers aims to draw lessons and apply indigenous knowledge, wisdom and cultural traditions to suit policy contexts describing the (a) role of individuals (b) communities, and (c) the state to ensure effectively manage water resources. Readers will discover ways in which water was conceptualized, conserved and managed. Contributions will also shed light on the historical, functional and futuristic perspectives of water resources management, and readers will be able to draw lessons and evolve policy guidelines. There are some studies related to scriptures across religions and their perceptions regarding ecological conservation. However, religious studies and their socio-economic and environmental relevance to society, more specifically to the current policy contexts, are limited. This book attempts to bridge this gap, in terms of learning lessons from the past to effectively address the challenges of the present and future. The book will be useful for historians and research scholars studying the place of water in different cultures, water pricing and water sharing; as well as ecologists and environmental scientists. .
    • Water as a Gift and Right — World Council of Churches

      WCC commissions and working groups, 2004-04-30
    • Water Is Life, Sanitation Is Dignity

      Makgoba, Thabo (1960-)
      The article presents a speech given by Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town, South Africa Thabo Makgoba at the February 2017 event Just Water in London, England. Topics include the biblical significance of water, issues related to justice and water rights in southern Africa, and the importance of environmental action for Christians. A personal narrative from the organizer of the Just Water conference is presented.
    • Water marks our life

      Lefebvre, Solange (1959-); Wacker, Marie-Theres (1952-) (SCM Press, 2012)
      Water in danger Lena Partzsch -- "My God, it's our river, shouldn't we preserve it? Without the river, what else have we got? Sylvie Shaw -- Water in the Old Testament Erhard S. Gerstenberger -- Water as Sacrament : global water crisis and sacramental stewardship Mark L. Allman -- "Give me this water..." : the water of life in John's Gospel Pierre Letourneau -- African women and water Anne-Beatrice Faye -- Feminine waterscapes : water as a gendered subject Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt -- Life, water and liberation Marcelo Barros -- Reading the Bible after Fukushima Kumiko Kato -- Bridge that divides : the bridge of Mostar Željko Ivanković -- Water in action Mary E. Hunt -- Making peace with water Luis Infanti de la Mora -- Kateri Tekekwitha : the first indigenous saint of North America Bernadette Rigal-Cellar -- Women as pioneers at Vatican II Ida Raming
    • Water Politics and Religious Practices in Kangding

      Yang, Nyimatashi Gongwei (DigitalCommons@Macalester College, 2017-06-06)
      This case study examines the use of water in Kangding, China. Kangding is a location in the Kham Himalaya which for centuries served as a strategic border area between Tibetan and Chinese worlds. As the discussion elaborates, an examination of the way that water has been used in the past and in the present demonstrates the dynamism of the religious practices prominent in locations such as Kangding. The study of water, and of the everyday religious practices with which it is associated, also intersects with growing resource management challenges that have come to the forefront during a contemporary period of development and modernization. I suggest that the recent resurgence of religion could deepen our understandings about local knowledge of the natural environment while shedding light on some ideas about its ideal use.
    • Water reservoir impact assessment in Indonesia : the environmental impact assessment process and the use of remotely sensed data

      Memorial University of Newfoundland. Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science; Hargono, Bambang,1954- (1992)
      Bibliography :l. 183-190.<br>