• Y a-t-il du sacré dans la nature ?

      Larrère, Catherine; Hurand, Bérangère; Berque, Augustin; Boureux, Christophe; Charbonnier, Pierre; Cugno, Alain; Génot, Jean-Claude; Gottlieb, Roger; Hache, Émilie; Hurand, Bérengère; et al. (Éditions de la Sorbonne, 2019-01-24)
      Si nous admirons la nature et aimons y méditer, si nous en reconnaissons la dignité et appelons à défendre son intégrité, si nous préférons la laisser faire plutôt que de chercher à nous y substituer, sacralisons-nous la nature ? Et cela nous place-t-il automatiquement dans une posture obscurantiste contraire au progrès scientifique et technique ? Ce volume regroupe les contributions des philosophes, théologiens, écologues et anthropologues réunis autour de ces questions en avril 2012, à la Sorbonne. La critique de la tendance religieuse, si controversée, de l'écologie contemporaine, passe ici par l'examen des raisons qui pourraient nous pousser à faire place à la notion de sacré, même si elle est relative et mouvante. Prendre au sérieux la re-sacralisation de la nature, tout en en refusant les manifestations les plus excentriques, c'est chercher quel sens théologique, psychologique, phénoménologique, éthique et même politique on peut donner à notre ancrage terrestre. Quand l'histoire naturelle et l'histoire humaine se rejoignent et se confondent, habiter la nature suppose de trouver le moyen de faire société avec elle tout en lui reconnaissant la liberté du sauvage, rétive à tout enfermement, même sous la forme de la sanctuarisation.
    • Yardwork: A Biography of an Urban Place by Daniel Coleman

      Hansen, Vivian M (Scholars Commons @ Laurier, 2018-08-10)
      Review of Daniel Coleman's Yardwork: A Biography of an Urban Place.
    • 'Ye bok as I herde say': Orality as a rhetoric in medieval and modern discursive contexts

      Sprenkle, Melissa C. Putnam.; The University of Tennessee
      Rather than viewing orality as a cognitive process or cultural context separate from literacy, this project argues that orality functions as a holistic rhetorical perspective and that there are three distinct orality rhetorics (epic, popular, and conversational) which use the notion of 'voice' to differently organize the relation between language, culture, and the world. To demonstrate the interpretative differences which result from the application of different orality rhetorics, this study examines and compares oral approaches to textual problems in medieval vernacular narrative poetry (specifically in reference to Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the Nibelungenlied).
    • Ye church and parish of Greenfield; the story of an historic church in an historic town. 1725-1913

      Merwin, George H. ([New Haven, The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor press, pref. 1913]Princeton Theological Seminary Library, 1913)
    • Year Book and Directory, publication, 1932 (East Fourth Street Baptist Church, Winston-Salem, N.C.)

      Supported by grant funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the federal Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources. (2017-03-02)
      This volume is a published book titled Year Book and Directory (1932) that contains brief history of the church, articles of faith, church covenant, church officials and membership rolls, and business advertisements. 40 pages.
    • Ympäristökysymykset luterilaisessa maailmanliitossa : Curitiban yleiskokoukseen 1990 saakka

      Helsingin yliopisto, Teologinen tiedekunta; University of Helsinki, Faculty of Theology,; Helsingfors universitet, teologiska fakulteten,; Pihkala, Panu (Helsingin yliopisto, 2005-05-16)
      Previous research on the topic could not be found. From Federation to Communion: a History of LWF (Schjørring, Jens et al., 1997) mentions environmental issues only a very few times and never as a topic of its own. The aim of the study was to clarify when the issues were started to deal with in LWF and how they were dealt with. In the Curitiba Assembly the issues gained great prominence, but hints pointing to much more earlier processing of the issues were found during the setting of the aims. Due to the thesis nature of the study the research material was limited to documents around assemblies and LWF publications directly on the topic. The study aimed to clarify influential theologians and lines of thought to the processing of the issues in LWF. LWF didn t turn out to be a forerunner in ecological issues, but it did start to discuss the issues quite soon after they were raised to larger conciousness (in the beginning of the seventies). President Mikko Juva spoke about the MIT report Limits to Growth in the meeting of the Executive Committee in 1973. The first publication of LWF to deal with the issues was the Study Book for the Dar es Salaam assembly (1977), prepared by two members of the General Secretariat. The need for greater attention to ecological issues was presented in the very end of the book, the placing corresponding to the general attention paid to the issues. Interestingly two ecotheologians were quoted: lutheran Joseph Sittler and baptist Kenneth Cauthen. The Sittler quotation was from his address (Called to Unity) in the WCC New Delhi assembly (1961) and dealt with cosmological christology. However, in the end the Dar es Salaam assembly only briefly noted that more attention should be paid to ecological issues and made certain very general statements about caring for creation, which can be understood as pointing just to interhuman relations. The most influential source for ecological ponderings in LWF turned out to be WCC. It had started to deal with ecological issues after the Uppsala assembly (1969) and held its first major conference on the issues in Bucharest in 1974. (A throughout presentation of the early WCC dealings with ecology in found in Economic Growth and the Quality of Life by Lindqvist, Martti, 1975.) On assembly level the issues surfaced for the first time in Nairobi (1975), where process theologian Charles Birch held his famous address. The very influential process theology did not gain overall acceptance, however, except in the MIT conference Faith and Science in an Unjust World (1979). The Vancouver assembly (1983) gave birth to the Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation (JPCC) process, but remained quite silent about actual ecotheology. In all the LWF assemblies of the research period the WCC influence was explicitly stated in the documents: in Dar es Salaam the Nairobi influence and in Budapest 1984 the general WCC influence. The research found the first real ecotheological statements of LWF from Budapest materials, and they turned out to be theologically more precise than the Curitiba 1990 materials. The research found out significant similarities, both implicit and explicit, between ecotheological statements in MIT 1979 and Budapest 1984. Support to WCC was promised, but JPIC was explicitly mentioned only in Curitiba, where it gained prominence even to the degree that some would think of the assembly as a JPIC happening. In Curitiba ecological issues overall gained unseen attention and were definately one of the main concerns. They were dealt with, in some degree, in all the major addresses. The study found out that the ecological part of the Curitiba preamble is to an astonishing degree copied from the assembly preparation materials. Allthough the prominence of ecological issues raised dramatically in the research period, the overall line of ecotheological thinking remained approximately the same. The need to care for creation was stated, based on traditional (lutheran) creation theology and especially Luther s explanations for the First Article and the Fourth Petition. However, during the research period LWF didn t really discuss the sacramental worldview that some ecotheologians (like Larry Rasmussen) have brought out basing on Luther s theology. The ecotheological line of LWF remained anthropocentric and no intrinsic value was explicitly given to nonhuman nature. The ecotheological model was named as stewardship, but can be seen as a modified old dominion model. In the Curitiba preparation documents and some addresses (especially Ronald F. Thiemann s) there is material which points to some kind of partner/covenant/ priest of creation- ecotheological model, but these kind of sentences were not approved to the Assembly Preamble. (I m following roughly the setting of models by Larry Rasmussen in Earth Community, Earth Ethics, 1996.) LWF was influenced in its dealing with environmental issues by for example process theology, but didn t officially join the same kind of conclusions. The Strasbourg Institute s research project on the eighties, Creation an Ecumenical Challenge?, led by Per Lønning and Mark Ellingsen, was found to be highly influential. Some of its influence could be seen already in Budapest, but most of it was directed to Curitiba. Also influential were the consultations on Land organized by the Department of Studies, first under Béla Harmati and then under Götz Planer-Friedrich. Some influence by former director of the department, Ulrich Duchrow, could also be found. Alltogether in the eighties German theologians gained much attention in ecotheological issues: among these were Günter Altner, Gerhard Liedke and Jürgen Moltmann. Another prominent area was Northern America, but some Scandinavians also made contributions. On a larger level the Scandinavian lutheran emphasis on theology of creation has made way for the processing of the issues. The most prominent non-western figure in the issues was found to be Emmanuel Abraham, who dealt with the issues already in Dar es Salaam and made a major presentation on them in Budapest.
    • Zakir Naik - Was Christ Crucified?

      http://www.islamicreplies.hostoi.com
      http://www.islamicreplies.hostoi.com http://www.islamicreplies.ucoz.com http://www.islamic-replies.ucoz.com Zakir Naik - Was Christ Crucified? Dr. Zakir Naik debates and refutes an Arab Christian scholar on whether or not Jesus was crucified, from the Christian's own Bible. Tags: islam, download, Deuteronomy, gospel, mark, matthew, luke, john, Islamic ,Perspective, Crucifiction, isaiah, Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, muslim, evolution, darwin, theory, zakir naik, quran, koran ,original, judgement, day, science, abdur raheem green, yusuf estes, hudaTV, IslamChannel, Ather khan, in, allah, god, divinty, theology, polygamy, juadism, adam, Dr. Israr Ahmed, Maulana, Abdul Kareem Parekh, Dr. Abdul Aziz Shaikh, Sanaullah Madani, Maulana Ashfaque Salafi; Shaikh Faizur Rehman Nadwi; Maulana Ejaz Aslam; Shaikh Shamim Fauzi; Maulana Salman Nadwi; Dr. Shuaib Sayyed, and, many, others, mohammad, muhammad, quran, ather khan abdur raheem green hussien, yea, answering-christianity muslim-responses, sami zaatari, osama abdullah, Answering-Islam, deedat, john 3:16, ahmed, IRF, farik naik, PEACETV, hindu, religion, zain bhika, atheism, jamal badawi, shabbir ally, women, secular, salah, salam, modern, christmas, samizaatari, zakir naik, zakir, naik, converted2islam, atheist, agnostic, jesus, moses, adam, salvation, theist, sikh, sikhism, deedat, jiad, terrorism, Yeshua, fasting, salah, salat, christ, torah, Jochen Katz, Ali Sina, Yathrib, Mecca, Catholic Protestant, Greek Orthodox, Slavonic Orthodox, Georgian, Armenian Apostolic, Syriac, Ihklas, Shiekh Feiz, Feiz Muhammad, jannah, Hijra, bismillah, Fatwa, akhirah, ruh, wudu, Ayat, Caliph, Eid Al-Adha, Eid Al-Fitr, nafs, barakat, thawab, tawheed, tawhid, taqwa, deen, jahannam, suhoor, sujood, Alhamdulillah, Jazakallahu, Khayrun, inshallah, Rasool, shaikh, niqab, biblegateway, mashallah, muslimah, venomfangx, ibn masud, scholar, Abu bin, gnostics, Zamakhshari, asad, slave, terror ,terrorism, moon, Sahih, Pedophilia, biblos, trinity, Talmud, Quennel Gale, Trinitarian, Trinitarianism, polytheism, Belief virgin, mother mary holy, spirit, Rashad Khalifa, Shakir Sale Sher Ali, Pickthall, Quran 9:5, 786, Solomon, kathir, qtafsir, Nadir Ahmed david wood shadid lewis james white mithra 25th december saturnalia bacchanalia Etymology unitarian Sharia, Debate Jehovah arabic Ebionites Marcionites jacobites Nestorians Israel Dajjal Messiah christ YHWH Yahweh Jeremiah rebuttal refutation Arab niqab Jizya
    • Zapomenutá generace. Nezávislé aktivity a samizdat na Plzeňsku v 80. letech 20. století.

      Vaněk, Miroslav; Valeš, Lukáš; Petrová, Jana (2011)
      The degree work deals with the last century period of the 80s and 90s in the Pilsen region. Generally, it was time of lack of freedom and intolerance when all the state power was concentrated in one political party - the Czechoslovak Communist Party. With support of police this party manipulated with citizens' dignity, rights and thinking. Through description of some civic activities the work records groups of independent thinking in the Pilsen region. These activities were source of independent atmosphere; that's why they were supervised by the state power; their protagonists were monitored and their activities were supressed. In the work the independent areas are divided into chapters: church, music, scouting, camping, ecology. Another chapter focuses on the local dissent activities. Its members were predominantly from the above mentioned groups. Last chapter deals with unofficial publishing (samizdat) in this period. The aim of the degree work is to find (or at least to outline) the starting points and reasons that finally brought members of various groups (often diametrically opposite) together on the way of independent activities, dissent and unofficial publishing (samizdat).
    • Zapomenutá generace. Nezávislé aktivity a samizdat na Plzeňsku v 80. letech 20. století.

      Vaněk, Miroslav; Valeš, Lukáš; Petrová, Jana (2017-04-27)
      Diplomová práce se zabývá obdobím 80. let 20. století na Plzeňsku. Obecně se jednalo o dobu nesvobody a netolerance, kdy veškerá moc ve státě byla soustředěna do rukou jedné politické strany - KSČ, která za pomoci bezpečnostního aparátu bez uzardění manipulovala s důstojností, právy i myšlením občanů. Práce mapuje nezávisle smýšlející skupiny obyvatel na Plzeňsku prostřednictvím popisu některých oblastí zájmových občanských aktivit, které tvořily jakési podhoubí místního nezávislého prostředí. Z toho důvodu se ocitly pod dohledem státní moci, jejich stoupenci byli sledováni a jejich činnost potlačována. Jednotlivé oblasti jsou v diplomové práci rozděleny do kapitol - církev, hudební alternativa, skauting, tramping, ekologie - ve kterých na úvodní celospolečenský vhled navazuje popis situace v regionu. Předposlední kapitola se zaměřuje na činnost místního disentu, jehož představitelé se rekrutovali převážně z výše uvedených skupin, poslední kapitola pak zachycuje samizdatovou tvorbu, která zde byla v tomto období vydávána. Snahou diplomové práce je nalézt nebo alespoň přiblížit východiska a důvody, které nakonec členy různě orientovaných skupin, často i diametrálně odlišných, přivedly na společnou cestu nezávislých aktivit, disentu a samizdatu.
    • Zen and the Art of Environmental Education in the Japanese Animated Film Tonari no Totoro

      Arran Stibbe; University of Gloucestershire (Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2008-01-25)
      The animated film Tonari no Totoro (My Neighbour Totoro) vividly depicts the interaction of people, forest spirits and nature in rural Japan. This article analyses the film both in its original Japanese and in two dubbed English versions, in relation to the film’s potential to contribute to environmental awareness. The starting point is a discussion of the limitations of current environmental education, in particular its focus on the abstract, the global, and the technical, at the expense of detailed observation of local ecosystems and the discovery of value within those systems. This is followed by analysis of Tonari no Totoro, focusing on how ecological insights drawn from Zen, Shintō and traditional Japanese culture are subtly woven into the film. The conclusion describes how the visual and linguistic features used in the film have the potential to promote a form of ecological consciousness closely attuned to the local environment.
    • Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics

      James, Simon P. (2016-01-09)
    • Zero Hunger: Faith Partnerships for Action

      Marshall, Katherine (2018-10-05)
      Achieving Zero Hunger is at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Sustainable Development Goal #2 sets out the objective to “End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture” by 2030, which involves multiple, interlinked challenges. Religious actors are involved in every dimension of the challenges that Zero Hunger presents. The roles that religious leaders and organizations play vary widely. They range from critical emergency support—whether in times of crisis, often as first responders—or as a true safety net for the poorest in every society. Religious actors also play vital roles through persistent advocacy, education of adherents, and prayer to ensure that those vulnerable to hunger never leave the public conscience. The examples of religious engagement with hunger issues highlighted in this report underscore the complex ways in which religious institutions are involved in every dimension of the hunger challenge. It was prepared for the World Food Programme, with support from the Eleanor Crook Foundation, in preparation for events in June 2016 where the Zero Hunger effort was discussed in the context of interreligious partnerships; Katherine Marshall is the principal author.
    • Zero Hunger: Faith Partnerships for Action

      Marshall, Katherine (2018-10-05)
      Achieving Zero Hunger is at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Sustainable Development Goal #2 sets out the objective to “End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture” by 2030, which involves multiple, interlinked challenges. Religious actors are involved in every dimension of the challenges that Zero Hunger presents. The roles that religious leaders and organizations play vary widely. They range from critical emergency support—whether in times of crisis, often as first responders—or as a true safety net for the poorest in every society. Religious actors also play vital roles through persistent advocacy, education of adherents, and prayer to ensure that those vulnerable to hunger never leave the public conscience. The examples of religious engagement with hunger issues highlighted in this report underscore the complex ways in which religious institutions are involved in every dimension of the hunger challenge. It was prepared for the World Food Programme, with support from the Eleanor Crook Foundation, in preparation for events in June 2016 where the Zero Hunger effort was discussed in the context of interreligious partnerships; Katherine Marshall is the principal author.
    • Znaczenie zarzadzania wiedza w ksztaltowaniu dobrostanu spolecznego w warunkach gospodarki opartej na wiedzy

      Lewandowska, Boguslawa (The Berkeley Electronic Press SelectedWorks, 2004-04-01)
    • Značajniji događaji iz povijesti šumarstva u Hrvatskoj

      Matić, Slavko; Akademija šumarskih znanosti; Anić, Igor; Akademija šumarskih znanosti; anic@sumfak.hr; Meštrović, Šime; Akademija šumarskih znanosti (Croatian Forestry Society, 2012-04-30)
      The purpose of this article is to elaborate on the relationship between man and forest in Croatia in the context of historical development of the forestry science and profession. To facilitate reading, the article makes use of list with some important years and events that marked the history of the man–forest relationship and the history of forestry in Croatia in particular. Each event is accompanied by a brief description of its features and data source. The goal is to illustrate the Croatian tradition of the profession, education and science of forests and forestry. This is one of the unique features that we bring into the European Union; the feature that past generations have managed to preserve and guard, taking account of forest sustainability and resources. Forestry as a science appeared in the 18th century. Its occurrence marks the third period in the man–forest relationship. It sprang from the need for the sustainable use of forest resources and the preservation of forests aft er deforestation (disappearance of water springs, onset of torrents, soil erosion, formation of bare rock, decrease in soil fertility, loss of forest resources) resulting from intensive cutting operations in the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century. This is the reason that forestry is defined as a science, profession and art of managing and preserving forest ecosystems, whose purpose is to secure permanent benefits to man, society and nature. Forestry is based on the principle of sustainability; defined in 1713, it is still the only proper example of sustainable development and sustainable management. The first written documents that regulate the relationship between man and forests in Croatia date from the 12th century. Forestry in Croatia was established in a very short period in the second half of the 18th century. It all began with the first forest inventory and mapping (1764), the foundation of forest offices (1765 in mountain region, 1773 in lowland region) and the first legally binding Regulation (1769) which introduced sustainable forest management in Croatia. The establishment of the first forest offices as the basic units of the profession can be considered as the official beginning of the development of forestry in Croatia. In three years, Croatian forestry will mark an important jubilee: two and a half century of its existence. In 1846, forestry professionals gathered within the forestry association of the Croatian Forestry Society, which began issuing its scientific-specialist and professional journal Šumarski List (Forestry Journal). The development of the profession was closely followed by the development of higher forestry education. In Croatia, forestry education was provided by vocational schools as early as 1860 and by the University of Zagreb since 1898, after theology, philosophy and law. Forestry is a complex activity that integrates biological, ecological, technical and economic components. It is for this reason that the beginnings of some scientific fields in Croatia emanate from higher forestry education programmes. Forests are the only Croatian self-renewable natural resource and national treasure. They are the source of drinking water, clean air, natural soil, flora and fauna, biodiversity, naturalness, mild climate, attractive landscape and wood material, or in one word, of life itself. As set down in the Constitution of the Republic of Croatia, forests rightly enjoy the status of goods of special interest that have particular protection. Every government in power has been acutely aware of the importance of forests and forestry and has carefully guarded and fostered them. It is no wonder, therefore, that the provided overview contains a set of laws and bylaws, regulations, instructions and directives that relate to forest management. Until recently, the importance of forests was also reflected in the name of the competent ministry, which always contained the word "forest" or "forestry". Forestry was born in the most forested part of Croatia, where it began its two-and-a-half-century long development. It is precisely here that high-quality, productive, and natural forests are still growing. The profession has adhered to scientific principles and regulations to create these forests by applying regeneration and tending operations. The existence, structure, the level of naturalness and biodiversity of these forest ecosystems are the product of Croatian forestry.