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dc.contributor.authorBen Jann
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-24T04:48:00Z
dc.date.available2019-10-24T04:48:00Z
dc.date.created2017-01-05 01:09
dc.identifieroai:RePEc:boc:usug11:20
dc.identifierRePEc:boc:usug11:20
dc.identifierhttp://repec.org/usug2011/UK11_Jann.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/854682
dc.description.abstractEliciting truthful answers to sensitive questions is an age-old problem in survey research. Respondents tend to underreport socially undesired or illegal behaviors while overreporting socially desirable ones. To combat such response bias, various techniques have been developed that are geared toward providing the respondent greater anonymity and minimizing the respondent's feelings of jeopardy. Examples of such techniques are the randomized response technique, the item-count technique, and the crosswise model. I will present results from several surveys, conducted among university students, that employ such techniques to measure the prevalence of plagiarism and cheating in exams. User-written Stata programs for analyzing data from such techniques are also presented.
dc.titlePlagiarism in student papers and cheating in student exams: Results from surveys using special techniques for sensitive questions
dc.typepreprint
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10452637
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/10452637
ge.lastmodificationdate2017-01-05 01:09
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148934
ge.oai.repositoryid1228
ge.oai.setnameRePEc
ge.oai.setspecRePEc
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttp://repec.org/usug2011/UK11_Jann.pdf


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