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dc.contributor.authorOriginal Byzantine church was probably built by order of Empress Eudocia
dc.contributor.authorone of the medieval phases of the church was built by Crusader
dc.contributor.authorthe current church was built by the Catholic order of the Assumptionists
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-24T15:42:44Z
dc.date.available2019-10-24T15:42:44Z
dc.date.created2017-02-28 00:53
dc.date.issuedEarliest church was probably built in 457 AD; destroyed probably in 614 AD; later rebuilt and destroyed again in the 10th century; rebuilt again circa 1102 and destroyed again in 1330; current church was built in the 1920s and consecrated in 1931; in the church's garden there are steps dated from circa 167-63 BC
dc.identifieroai:oaicat.oclc.org:ASITESPHOTOIG_10313388816
dc.identifierThumbnail: http://media.artstor.net/imgstor/size2/asitesphoto/d0001/sites_photo_r10471381_as_8b_srgb.jpg
dc.identifierImage View: http://library.artstor.org/library/secure/ViewImages?fs=true&id=8CNaaSQwKSw0NzU8dSUURXorXXkgfV11fg%3D%3D
dc.identifierRanking: 43750
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/982514
dc.description.abstract~The name of this church commemorates St. Peter's triple denial of Jesus before the "cock crowed twice" (Mark 14:30). The current church was built in the 1920s by the Catholic Assumptionists and consecrated in 1931. It was erected probably over the remains of an older Byzantine basilica dated from 457 AD and built by Empress Eudocia. It was destroyed by the Persians in 614 AD, and later rebuilt only to be destroyed again in the 10th century and yet again rebuilt by the Crusaders circa 1102, when it was given its current name of 'Peter In Gallicantu'. The Crusader church was again destroyed in 1330. Tradition suggests it stands over the house of the Roman-appointed Jewish High Priest Caiaphas. One of the grottoes in the church's crypt is called Jesus' Prison where, according to Christian belief, Jesus was questioned by Caiaphas before he was taken to trial in front of Pontius Pilate. In the garden of the church, ancient stone steps are visible. They are referred to as the Hashmonean Staircase and were probably built in that era (circa 167-63 BC). The staircase connected the residential district of the High City that extended north of Mount Zion and Kidron Valley
dc.rightsFor uses beyond the ARTstor Terms and Conditions of Use, please contact Samuel Magal, Owner and Head Photographer at Samuel@sites-and-photos.com or Ronit Marco, Content Manager, at ronit@sites-and-photos.com; Website: www.sites-and-photos.com; Address: 84 Goshen Blvd. Kiryat Motzkin 26301 Israel; Tel.+972 4 6904 503; Fax +972 4 6904 855; Cell +972 544 799 642
dc.sourceImage and original data provided by Shmuel Magal, Sites and Photos
dc.titleSt. Peter in Gallicantu Church
dc.typeArchitecture and City Planning
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10607931
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/10607931
ge.lastmodificationdate2017-02-28 00:53
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid149001
ge.oai.repositoryid1470
ge.oai.setnameSetArtstorFull5
ge.oai.setspecSetArtstorFull5
ge.oai.streamid5
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