Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPilar Piqué
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-23T15:30:27Z
dc.date.available2019-09-23T15:30:27Z
dc.date.created2019-06-28 23:38
dc.date.issued2019-05-01
dc.identifieroai:doaj.org/article:287272127eb74397bd53086f8554b2ec
dc.identifier1843-2298
dc.identifier1844-8208
dc.identifierhttps://doaj.org/article/287272127eb74397bd53086f8554b2ec
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/99507
dc.description.abstractThis paper aims to address two research questions that have not been sufficiently examined by specialized studies of the intellectual history of Adam Smith. The first question asks why Smith, after developing his theory of sympathy in the first editions of The Theory of Moral Sentiments, started working on a theory of jurisprudence and ended up writing The Wealth of Nations. The second question asks why Smith, after writing and republishing The Wealth of Nations, asserted that he could not complete his theory of jurisprudence and incorporated a new part dedicated to virtue ethics in the last edition of The Theory of Moral Sentiments in 1790. The paper shows that: 1) after developing his theory of sympathy in the first edition of The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith stated that a theory of jurisprudence was necessary to form rules of justice that guarantee social order, and in the search for that theory he ended up writing The Wealth of Nations; 2) in The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith was devoted to studying the development of commerce in modern society and the conduct of the mercantile individual who pursued his own interest, and was incapable of elaborating on those general principles of justice that would ensure social harmony. Smith then delved into virtue ethics in order to recommend virtuous conduct that encourages mercantile individuals to become good citizens. The paper concludes by contending that economics would benefit from a better understanding of the relationship between political economy, jurisprudence and ethics in the work of Adam Smith. Specifically, economics would broaden in scope of study and contribute to larger debates about the past, present and future of modern civilization.
dc.languageDE
dc.languageEN
dc.languageFR
dc.publisherRosetti Internaţional
dc.relation.ispartofhttps://jpe.ro/pdf.php?id=8391
dc.relation.ispartofhttps://doaj.org/toc/1843-2298
dc.relation.ispartofhttps://doaj.org/toc/1844-8208
dc.sourceJournal of Philosophical Economics, Vol XII, Iss 2, Pp 75-96 (2019)
dc.subjectethics
dc.subjectjurisprudence
dc.subjectpolitical economy
dc.subjecteconomic thought
dc.subjectEconomics as a science
dc.subjectHB71-74
dc.titleThe Theory of Moral Sentiments and The Wealth of Nations. Ethics, jurisprudence and political economy throughout the intellectual history of Adam Smith
dc.typeArticle
ge.collectioncodeBP
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:16273222
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/16273222
ge.lastmodificationdate2019-06-28 23:38
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148650
ge.oai.repositoryid52
ge.oai.setnameLCC:Economics as a science
ge.oai.setspecTENDOkVjb25vbWljcyBhcyBhIHNjaWVuY2U~
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttps://doaj.org/article/287272127eb74397bd53086f8554b2ec


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record